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16

This phenomenon affects fruits much worse than vegetables actually. The FDA published a report that cut or peeled fruits will lose half their vitamin C content in 1-2 weeks. Over 10-25% of this loss will occur in fruits in only 5 days. For vegetables there exists a similar, albeit less pronounced effect. When cut the flesh inside of the vegetable is exposed ...


8

Significant loss of nutrients during pasteurization is simply a myth. According to the National Council Against Health Fraud, the loss of nutrients when pasteurizing milk is very small. Most nutrients are unaffected. There is approximately a 10-20% loss of vitamin C, 10% loss of thiamin, and 0-10% loss of vitamin B12. See the linked article to get their ...


7

Vitamin B12 is stored in the liver and muscle of animals, and is also passed on to eggs and milk, so these are good sources for non-vegans. Humans produce B12 in the gut, but cannot absorb it. Many other animals produce it in the gut too, so unwashed plants that have been fertilized with animal feces may be a source of B12. However, there are many other ...


7

So long as we are discussing this topic. The Center for Disease Control has a specific answer for your question and their answer is NO. However, According to this paper from the National Center for Biotechnology Information pasteurization causes a breakdown in milk-caesin protein which after uptake through Peyer's patch can promote allergic sensitivity. ...


5

Look at it this way: What happens if you boil it, and what happens if you don't? If you boil, you reduce the risk of getting food poisoning. If you don't boil, you reduce the risk of getting malnourished. Now, if the temperature-sensitive nutrients in milk are all that stands between a healthy you and a malnourished you, then you are doing something ...


3

I would suggest that you look to Rene Redzepi's new Nordic cuisine, which sources the very type of ingredient(s) in which you're interested. Common scurvy-grass grows along French, northern Spanish, Danish and Norwegian coasts and on mountain peaks in Western Europe. Weigh anchor and sail to the Basque Country coast, and search the Barbadun, Plentzia and ...


2

You won't be adding any ascorbic acid or such -would curdle the milk- but an oil based vitamin such as found inside a vitamin E gel-cap would mix in fine. Would only be as absorbable or bio-available as the original vitamin product. The idea of fortifying soya comes from the notion that we get a large amount of our nutrients from cows milk and without it, ...


2

If you drink up your juice within 3 to 4 days, the vitamin content will not decrease significantly. Usually, if properly stored, vitamis last for years. Here is a link to some more information. Although not specifically talking about juice, I still found it informative: https://labdoor.com/article/do-vitamins-go-bad


2

Whole grain contains more iron than the more processed grain. So that might help. Seeds and nuts also contain a lot of iron. While nuts in themselves are a choking hazard for babies, ground nuts mixed with the rest of the stuff you grind should be no problem.


2

"It is a bit like skateboarding: it is not a safe thing to do, but people find it pleasant, and the occasional problem (bruises in skateboarding, upset stomach from raw milk) is worth it from their point of view." I can recall a family where I grew up in northern California that insisted on 'raw milk'. So they bought a cow & enjoyed their own 'raw milk'....


2

You could could mix it into softened butter (or a butter spread) and then top foods like toast or crackers with it.


1

Treat yourself as if you were a young child, and pretend you're getting a 3-year-old version of yourself to take some medicine in powdered form :) I personally like just putting it on a cold sorbet; we did this when our youngest could not stand the taste of an antibiotic, so we had to crush it in pill form and find ways to have her ingest it. Raspberry ...


1

From wikipedia "No fungi, plants, or animals (including humans) are capable of producing vitamin B12. Only bacteria and archaea have the enzymes needed for its synthesis." So you get B-12 by eating bacteria, either dirty food, dirty water, or animals that ate dirty food and dirty water on your behalf. The "artificial" sources of B12 come from large vats ...


1

If milk is not enriched with vitamin D, it usually contains very little when straight from the cow. This can vary based on the cow's diet and the breed of cow along with other factors. To find out whether whole milk in your country has added vitamin D, you will need to read the labels on the milk you buy. If it's not mandated by your government, each brand ...


1

Dehydration in all ways spoils nutrients. There are few tricks (like freeze/dry dehydration, sulfur dehydration, and orange juice bathing), but in the end you will always loose something along the way. That said, home dehydration is not as bad or aggressive like industrial one is, so you will probably still end up with a positive weight/nutrients ratio. But, ...


1

Raw milk does cause illness in a small number of cases todays (By American National Statistics). But theres is a growing body of research to suggest that its large probiotic content (CFU count and number of strains) improves health significantly if consumed regularly (also beneficial fat content). Skim milk or low fat milk are being found to cause illness ...


1

Fresh cut vegetables lose none of their nutritional content. If you are cutting a salad before dinner you have nothing to be concerned about. The only time cutting matters is when produce is prepared many days in advance. If that is the case, vitamins are not the only thing lost, so are flavor and texture.


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