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37

According to this article about Blumenthal's method, which also explains the other ingredient/method choices: https://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/07/dining/07curious.html The key to the Fat Duck batter is the alcohol, which does a couple of very useful things. It dissolves some of the gluten proteins in the wheat flour, so no elastic network forms and the crust ...


14

Vodka by definition is a flavorless distilled alcohol, retaining any of the organoleptic properties of the grain or potato could be considered as ruining the end product. Potatoes are a good source of starch, but brewers yeast has a limited ability to break down starch into usable fuel; its preferred fuel sources are relatively simple sugars like mono and ...


11

Cheaper spirits can certainly be used in culinary applications. The results won't be identical, but inexpensive liquors are a lot more cost-effective since the subtle differences in flavor between middling and quality spirits tend to get masked by other flavors. This is especially true when you're applying heat, which will burn off much of the alcohol (...


10

Olives (and onions) are a very traditional garnish used by bartenders to add a slightly savory flavor to a drink. As with many things behind the bar, they're used nowadays largely because they're iconic, but they do have a subtle effect on flavor. It's not really known where traditional garnishes such as citrus peels, cherries, olives/onions, and mint ...


7

As a chemist I'd say that the question is really impossible to answer as given. The gist is that for a water/ethanol mixture both components will evaporate. So if the liquid is left out long enough, the liquid will evaporate completely. The atmosphere contains essentially no ethanol so an equilibrium between the whole atmosphere and the ethanol in a ...


6

It is a myth that premium vodkas are somehow purer than cheap vodkas. In fact, quite the opposite is true. Pure grain alcohol, or ethanol, is neither odorless nor flavorless. It actually tastes and smells just like medicinal rubbing alcohol, and it burns like hell going down. Now that is exactly what you get when you buy bargain supermarket vodka. Just ...


6

Nope, it appears to be totally fictional. It's referred to as $750,000, with a bottle of gold. That could be real, except that it doesn't appear to be. You can spend that much on a bottle of Russian vodka, but none of the bottles look like that. 10 Most expensive vodkas


5

Osobaya Sayanskaya literally translates to Sayanskaya Deluxe or Special Sayanskaya, possibly implying that its origins are in the Sayan Mountains region. There is no real brand of vodka like that, although Sayanskaya Kristaljnaya (Crystal Sayanskaya) vodka does seem to exist. It’s not at all famous or of known special quality however.


5

Rum used in tiramisu is mainly for flavor. It's not a fundamental ingredient that will completely change the outcome of the recipe. That being said if you wish, you can omit the rum without adding the vodka. The vodka will add nothing to the tiramisu recipe since vodka is made to be flavorless. As Jefromi mentioned in the comment, there are plenty of ...


4

You made something what in Poland we call tincture Nalewka . But we usually use 160 proof spirit. Fresh fruits in alcohol will infuse it with it's taste and sweetness. Very good with clean alcohol. Not so great with one that already have some aroma in it. May produce strange things as whiskey wood may not go well with some fruit freshness (for me anyway). ...


4

I think you (and your friend) are confusing two similar terms. "Single Malt" - the making of spirit from a single type of grain by a produced by a single distiller (for whisky, that's malted barley in the UK and malted rye in the US) "Single Barrel/Cask" - the process of bottling each aged cask of liquor separately without mixing the ...


4

If you don't want to buy the alcohol but you have a good baking section in your local market or a nice baking shop, consider using the vodka for the alcohol content (just in case it does matter) and get the rum flavor using an extract. You would probably need about one teaspoon or so, depending on how strong you want the flavor to be. You may also want to ...


4

I make liqueurs and always buy the cheap stuff, makes no difference at all in the final product.


4

I have family in Reunion Island - one top seller of bourbon vanilla. The only vodka they have there is imported, and rhum (or rum if you prefer to spell it that way) is readily available. Personally I would recommend: 150 ml / 5 oz. of neutral alcohol (e.g. rhum, vodka, eau-de-vie) 2 beans 8 weeks (6 min) without light, occasional shake You can also use ...


4

Yes. We use apple jack in apple pie crust, which is a hard liquor with a sweet apple flavor. (As I recall, we took this idea from Alton Brown in an Apple Pie episode.) The apple jack provides the same benefit for flaky crust, and more apple flavor.


4

Crystallized (or Stem) ginger preserved in honey is a known thing. Shelf-life is supposed to be about 3 months for the homemade kind, and I'd say twice that (at a minimum) for store bought...Those are both pretty conservative. It should have been properly prepared/canned at the start, which would reduce the possibility of some nasty microbial infestation, ...


3

Storing ginger, an underground rhizome, which has a significant chance of having botulism spores present in an low-oxygen environment in honey is probably a very poor idea. The honey certainly will not be sufficiently acidic to inhibit the growth of the bacterium and the production of its toxin. I cannot guess what the precipitate you see is, but I would ...


3

It is almost certain that you do not have a gelatin in your mango infusion: gelatin is formed when an animal connective protein called collagen is hydrated at moderately high temperatures in the presence of water. Instead, what I suspect happened is that the pectin, a gelling agent present in fruits, including mangoes, has had long enough to dissolve into ...


3

Judging by the recipe posted on Serious Eats, there are about 2 tablespoons of vodka per crust. Substituting two tablespoons of rum or other liquor may be enough to lend a minimum of fragrance, but I would not expect a strong flavor. I am not sure it would be perceptible in the over all flavor balance of the complete pie with its filling. You would need ...


3

No, it's not real, but it was probably based on russobaltique vodka.


2

I would recommend not immersing the decanter entirely, but placing it up to the neck in hot water. This will expand the glass of the decanter slightly, but not the stopper. That might be enough to let you coax it out. The shape of your stopper is also convenient for making a little noose for it out of cord/thin rope, to allow you to get some extra ...


1

I would say yes, both are distilled rice alcohol. There might be some differences in the raw (uncooked) alcohol, but if used in a recipe and cooked, the differences will be less. Curious, what recipes are you looking at ? it might help us find a better alternative if it exists.


1

What I ended up doing was using 1/2 tsp of almond aroma and 1 tbsp of vodka. The taste was good, but I could have put much more vodka. I'll do that next time.


1

You can also use a charcoal/carbon filter and remove some of the harsh impurities in the cheap neutral spirits such as your vodka. Here is a link if you would like to read more. Here a second article that discusses same approach, just different insight.


1

You can live without the vodka, right? Best chance is to sink the bottle in a bucket/sink of warm water and let it soak. Water often will make its way into the fitting and loosen whatever crud is holding the bits together. A little dish soap will lessen surface tension and speed the process. The warmth of the water will raise the temperature of the vodka ...


1

The raw starch in the potatoes has first to be gelatinized by boiling ,to expose the starch grains to the action of the Amylases (literally means enzyme that breaks down complex starch molecules into glucose). The yeast cannot digest the starch directly.The glucose so produced is broken down to ethanol(alcohol) and carbon dioxide. This is the same process ...


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