Hot answers tagged

7

Sounds like your question is actually whether you can make pancakes with waffle batter. You can certainly give it a try, especially since you already made the batter. Not sure exactly how the texture will turn out, but the ratios are pretty similar to pancake batter so they'll probably be good enough you'll be happy eating them. They won't be waffles, ...


7

It is certainly safe to keep them refrigerated for a few days, but you will probably get much better results by freezing them. The cooked starches will re-crystalize if you refrigerate them, making them hard and unpalatable--this is one of the major modes of staling. By freezing them, you reduce this effect. You can then heat them directly from frozen in ...


6

Some waffle irons flip to evenly spread the batter. This is important in commercial applications where the visual presentation of the product is crucial and can save on batter - you can use less batter to get a thick, complete waffle. The waffle iron presses rely on the expansion of the batter to create a complete waffle. Sometimes in order to get a full, ...


5

Flour, water, butter, and baking powder does not sound like a great egg substitute to me. Your best option is to just go find a vegan belgian waffle recipe. There are tons of them, and they should be much more reliable than trying to modify an existing recipe. If you're really set on modifying that one recipe, look for a better egg substitute. There are ...


4

We always make extra waffles for later use. For short term storage (1 - 2 days) I put them in the fridge. For anything longer I freeze them. You definitely do not want to fully cook the waffles as they will become hard when you reheat them. (Especially if you like them crispy.) So to your point, intentionally undercook them. I usually cook them to about 2/3 ...


4

Not only is it okay to do so, I frequently place waffles directly on oven racks after making them fresh to keep warm or to cool before freezing (without ruining the crisp crust, as happens when you put them on a plate or stack them). There's no reason you can't heat items you'd normally put in a toaster (or toaster oven) in a normal oven. The only possible ...


4

Make sure the pan is properly preheated to cooking temperature before pouring the batter in. If you've oiled it, and water sizzles and skips when splashed on the pan, you should be good to go.


3

We regularly use the King Arthur Flour recipe, and consistently get waffles that are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside. A couple suggestions: Make sure the waffle iron is completely preheated before adding the batter. This recipe does need the waffles to cook for long enough; they'll be slightly dark. If you're only cooking them to a light golden, ...


3

If you use a waffle batter recipe, in a frying pan, in a hot oven, what you're making is called a Dutch Baby. I strongly recommend preheating the pan in the oven before adding the batter for maximum rise. What that will not be is a waffle. It might be good anyway -- you're always taking a chance with gluten-free doughs -- but it seems worth a try, ...


3

You cannot find a "golden ratio" as there is no such thing for something as diverse as "waffles": Brussels Waffles Liège Waffles Butter waffles Vanilla waffles Blueberry waffles Honey Waffles ... Just take a recipe for waffles that resembles the kind of waffles you want to make and substitute one ingredient for another (In this case, I'd start with a ...


3

It's okay to do so. There are mini-ovens / toasters where you put pop-tarts/ toast/bread/waffles directly on the (clean) grill. Nick Johnson, source If the heating rods are directly in the base (like in orinary big eletric ovens) make sure that no crumbs are on the base. This can cause nasty burnt crumbs. Or at least remove the crumbs after you heated up ...


3

It'll be fine. Just put it in the refrigerator after the initial rise. That will slow the yeast considerably. (If you let it sit on the counter for three hours, yeah, it risks over-rising and becoming a mess on your counter.) I usually make yeasted waffle dough the night before. That way, all I have to do in the morning is heat up the waffle iron and get ...


3

With the stipulation that you will need a cone form to roll the cookies on, I think the ideal cookie base for your application is the tuile. You would have to adjust the flavorings, probably. You can find many recipes by googling, such as this one from King Arthur Flour. Here is an example of ginger-molasses tuiles recipe. Tuiles are malleable when they ...


3

The reason why your Liege waffle has breadlike texture is that it is supposed to have a breadlike texture. While currently in America, waffles tend to have a uniform texture with small variations, and everybody has come to expect waffles within this range, in Europe waffles are any dough or batter baked in a waffle iron. I have waffle books which contain ...


3

May I also suggest replacing the water with club soda? The carbon dioxide imparts no flavor but forces additional fluffy-ness to the recipe. I've done this successfully with both waffles and pancakes.


2

I think you have chosen a recipe which is rather high in flour and low in fat. Flour doesn't have much taste on its own. Fat enhances all tastes. These waffles might taste good while they are still crispy-browned-hot, but after the cooling, the effect is lost. I normally make this waffle recipe. You will notice that it has the same amount of butter - 125 g ...


2

I actually tried making ice cream cones a few days ago (I thought it might be fun to go with some home made sorbet). I was recently given The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz and so I used the recipe in his book. The cone recipe he gave was similar to a tuile (I guess ice cream cones really are just a conical tuile) using egg whites, sugar, plain flour and ...


2

I combined butter and syrup and warmed it. Best of both - melted butter and warm syrup.


2

Melt a small amount of butter in a large frying pan over medium / low medium. When melted, put the waffle in the pan and lightly toast. Your waffle will be evenly coated, warm and even crispier. Be careful not to burn your butter or waffle. We use this sinful method to make butter buns more buttery. If doing more than one, you might have to clean the pan. ...


2

In the past, I've used both but haven't used a waffle iron in the last 30 years even though I still own one. (OK: TBH: the waffle iron is hanging on the wall as decoration and a reminder to my grandmother) There's just no substitute for a real Belgian Waffle maker because the plates are interchangeable and you can make: Brussels waffles Liège waffles ...


2

I believe they're made as half-balls and sandwiched together with the filling. If your recipe comes out of the oven pliable they could be baked in a similar way to brandy baskets and moulded before they cool. Otherwise you'd need to bake the half shells over or in a mould. That's a matter of finding a food- and oven-safe item of the right shape and size. ...


1

You misunderstand the purpose of salt and baking soda/baking powder. Your waffles will likely not be great if made from your suggested recipe. Salt is there as flavor. Virtually all recipes for baked goods (which broadly includes pancakes and waffles) include salt, and will taste bland without it. Baking powder is there to leaven the waffles. It does not ...


1

I'm no expert when it comes to waffles, but one thing that comes to mind is that a manual waffle iron may need to be flipped to deliver heat to both sides, whereas the electric one delivers more even heating by having hot plates on both sides. You can buy a waffle maker (or 'snack maker', I think it's by Tefal) that does waffles, pancakes, mini doughnuts, ...


1

Food safety wise, 2-3 days in the fridge will be OK, or even up to 5. Taste wise, they will not be very good. You will get better results if you refrigerate the batter (again, keep for 3-5 days, throw away earlier if it stars bubbling or smelling sour). But the batches after the first one will be rather flat/dense, because the leavening won't work. For ...


1

Given the very-specific times and temperatures given in the recipe, I'd bet that deviating at all would probably cause this result. Step #7 specifically states that you want to slow and limit the yeast's growth, which I would guess is to form very fine gas bubbles in the dough and provide a final burst as the waffle cooks. Letting it proof for so much ...


1

Butter in liquid state is more easy to mix and get an homogeneous batter. Given enough effort, creamed butter does the same thing. By effort, I mean making sure not to overlook tiny lumps of heterogeneous batter; otherwise the texture will be different. Also, if you are mixing the eggs with some lukewarm butter, it may be a health concern if you don't use ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible