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55

It's actually the opposite, you shouldn't boil water for tea unless you want it boiling. Water has dissolved oxygen in it, the more you have the nicer your tea will taste. This has been covered in this question. The hotter your water gets, the faster it loses dissolved oxygen, so you'll get better tea (for most people's palates) if you raise your water to ...


55

The salmon will get water logged and mushy (and consequently release a lot of water during the cooking process) if you omit the bag. It's not unsafe, but it will decrease the quality of the salmon.


53

It doesn't go bad, but it does change the taste. When water is just sitting there, water evaporates, but most things dissolved in it don't. Then, each time you boil it, the steam causes additional water to escape leaving the same amount of dissolved stuff in there. So, the concentration of dissolved stuff keeps going up. Dissolved oxygen also decreases when ...


48

No, mint won't dissolve in water (leaves are mostly cellulose), but it does make excellent tea. Boiling water, steep 5-6 minutes. For best results, I recommending purchasing whole leaf mint intended for use as a tea. That way you can experiment and determine which kind of mint you feel makes the best tea (or make your own blend, I like spearmint tea with a ...


46

There is one very different issue to be kept in mind - water in a microwave can overheat and "explode" once it is disturbed. Another poster had exactly this problem a short while ago: Water exploded in Microwave So follow the usual precautions, e.g. putting a wooden toothpick or a small, very clean stone (chemists have them in their labs) in your vessel. ...


35

I think the primary considerations are convenience (how much effort is it to set up and use the system?) and time spent (how long does the system take to heat the water?). A standard electric stove can have 2500W elements, and most of this energy will go into a kettle sitting on the element and thus heat the water. Even a big built-in microwave won't be ...


34

Bear in mind that I'm using an electric kettle, rather than a stove-top one. First, the advantage of a kettle is that it is quite efficient, and turns itself off once the water is boiling. This as opposed to the microwave, which only stops after a set time, rather than relying on the condition of the water. Second, a microwave can cause water to superheat,...


31

You are doing precisely the opposite of 'normal' procedure, which is to put the lid on the pan until the water starts boiling, then remove the lid (either partially or completely) to prevent boiling over. A reduction in the hob temperature will also probably be necessary, and is in any case desirable - mercilessly boiling any vegetable is rarely a good thing....


27

You'd end up with something somewhere between unleavened bread, pasta & laminate flooring, depending on what else you did with it. The first two are what you'd get if that's how you treated them, the last is what you'd get if you thought you were going to get shortcrust pastry ;) Late edit This started out as one of my more flippant short answers, but ...


22

Mint leaves, and plant matter in general, won’t dissolve in water no matter how finely you grind them. They are largely made of substances which are simply not (very) soluble in water. At best you’ll achieve a “suspension”, where the particles remain suspended in the liquid for some time; but it won’t be stable, and eventually they’ll sink to the bottom or ...


21

Make bread with it (let it cool enough that you don't kill the yeast, first.) Make soup with it.


20

I've read that if you can't or don't use it for your own consumption, that houseplants really love it (after it's cooled, of course).


20

Osmotic Pressure If you boil vegetables in water, some of the compounds from within the cells will leach out of the vegetables into the water. The reason is because vegetables are bags of water with goodies inside and a semi-permeable membrane holding them together (the skin). The compounds inside (vitamins and other micro-nutrients) look around and say: &...


19

Water treatment often uses chlorine or chloramine to kill germs or algae. If you are smelling it it's more likely to be Chloramine than Chlorine. Chlorine will dissipate from water over time naturally, but boiling for 20 minute will drive it out. Chloramine will also dissipate naturally, but in a much longer time frame, and would take over a day to boil out. ...


18

SUMMARY: Unless I'm missing something here or you're doing very odd things with your refrigerator, you'd at most save a couple dollars per year by keeping your fridge/freezer full. Moreover, stocking up on water (or other things) to fill up fridge/freezer space won't save you much at all unless you're keeping it stored there for a VERY long time, since it ...


17

You have several options for mint-flavored water, and none of them includes dissolving dried mint leaves in it. As others said, leaves don't dissolve in water (plants would be in a lot of trouble if they did!) You can make a mint tea. You pour hot water over the dried (or fresh) leaves, leave it for a few minutes, then strain it. Buying mint tea in bulk ...


16

Lemon juice This one is fairly obvious and self-explanatory. Although the idea is mainly associated with highly sugarey lemonade, just a few drops of juice in a bottle of water and no extra sugar gives it a nice touch. Vinegar A matter of taste. Many will find this just gross, but it has of course a similar tartiness as lemon and less sugar. Cucumber This ...


14

Joe is essentially right. Bubbles form in a liquid at what are called nucleation sites - small irregularies in the container or in the liquid itself. If you look at the bottom of some beer glasses, there are little nodules (often in the shape of the brewer's logo) that nucleate bubbles of the CO2 that's dissolved in the beer. Much the same occurs with ...


14

As far as I know it does not go bad, but there is a good reason not to fill your kettle completely when you fill it from the tap. Partly filled kettles come to the boil in less time. Also costing less in energy, which can be a concern for some. So fill the kettle part way, say to the amount of water you actually use and you will spend less time waiting but ...


13

Seconds, not minutes. Just the act of pouring the water will cool it slightly. At sea-level pure water will be 100C at a full boil, the temperature will drop immediately when it's no longer being heated. This is unscientific at best, but just for giggles I put an accurate digital thermometer into a room temperature mug, and brought a couple of cups of cups ...


13

With a bread maker, it's important to follow the recipe closely, at least until you've got a reliable result , when you can start experimenting. Mine, for example, expects "tepid" water for most programs, which the book defines as 20-25°C. The super rapid program requires 46-51°C. Cooler and there won't be time for the yeast to get going, much ...


12

I have read a couple of experiments (in Dutch so I will not link them here) where people cooked the same dish from the same shrooms, with one batch brushed and the other washed. The washed batch did need higher temparature to actually fry, instead of just boiling in their own moisture and the texture in the finished dish remained different. There does seem ...


11

Besides temperature adjustments or stirring, in the case of boiling starches in water (pasta, potatoes, etc.), you can add a little bit of oil to mess with the formation of the bubbles. This won't help if you've got a rolling boil, but will give you a better safety margin when you're closer to a simmer. Place any wooden-handled utensil into or across the ...


11

If you have a clean glass pitcher, the length of time we're talking is months, as mentioned by Tom's answer. I think you have a few questions that I can clear up: The bubbles that form over time are dissolved gases. From the faucet (or pitcher), the act of pouring will force some air into the water. Over time, it will warm up and you'll see bubbles form ...


11

In terms of sautéing, the simple answer is that using oil is going to let you develop fond, i.e. the tasty brown stuff, on your veggies whereas cooking only with water will essentially boil/steam your vegetables — and perhaps give them a little char, as well. In cooking, both oil and water are basically just things you use to transfer heat to food. They are ...


11

I often use this technique at home to cook proteins. It shortens cooking time by using steam as a heat transfer medium to cook the top of the item at the same time as the bottom. You can also use this method on frittatas, dumplings, etc. You can also use flavored liquids to impart flavor as well. I particularly like hard cider with chicken and pork.


11

1.5 litres for 4 servings is 375ml per serving (plus some volume from the veg which I'll ignore) assuming no water boils off. That's a sensible portion. I reckon my soup bowls hold just a little less than that, but you'll leave some in the pan when serving . So I doubt you lose a lot of water when you normally cook it. That said, I'd err on the side of ...


11

Yes, if you use brine! (And keep an eye on it to make sure you don't leave it in too long after thawing.) It's interesting that Lawnmower Man brings up osmotic pressure. Though he makes some very good points, he missed the fact that you aren't bound to using plain water; you can balance the osmotic pressure by adding salt (or sugar, which is common when ...


10

There is no difference. Whether you boil water in a kettle or in a microwave, it reaches a temperature of 100 °C/212 °F at sea level. Not only that, but no method that doesn't involve pressure will get the water to reach a temperature of over 100 °C/212 °F. Water boiled in a microwave is just as safe as water boiled in a kettle.


10

If your are dealing with chloramine, a trick I've used in homebrewing is to add powdered ascorbic acid (vitamin c) while heating the water up to around 170 for 15 minutes or so. This will pull the chloramine out of solution and you'll end up with some particulate solid residue on the bottom of the pot from the reaction, so you'd probably want to decant the ...


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