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35

The "Ash" is not an ingredient in the flour To be clear, the "Ash" is a measure of what you'd get left - if you burned the flour. It is not an ingredient in the bag of flour. More specifically if you had 100g of flour - the "Ash" number is literally how much the Ash would weight if you burned all of it. As starch burns readily, what you'll be left with is ...


15

Cook some of each. The one that's done in 20 mins or so is bulgur. [I tend towards 1:1.6 bulgur:water, 15 mins simmer, 15 mins rest.] The one that eventually needs more water adding & takes at least another half hour is cracked wheat. …then label them ;)) Alternatively, the heat-free method. Soak both overnight in excess water. The edible one is bulgur.


11

Flour is mostly starch, and starches are long chains of sugar molecules. When you add hot water to starches they gelatinize and burst, and these gelatinized starches soften the dough. Gelatinization works faster at higher temperatures. There are enzymes in the flour which break the starch down into sugars, and they work more efficiently at high than room ...


9

Some forms of wheat are suitable for immediate cooking in a similar way to rice, such as Bulghur. This is traditional in much of the Middle East, and has been par-cooked prior to sale. Cracked wheat is also available, but requires longer cooking. Note that terms overlap and even manufacturers can be vague. Whole wheat seeds do exist, sold for sprouting; ...


7

These are two related, but different products. Gluten is protein that is formed from two pre-cursor proteins, glutanin and gliaden, found in wheat flour in the presence of water and under enzymatic activity. It forms resilient stretchable networks which give yeast raised bread its structure. Whole wheat flour is... well... whole wheat berries, ground up. ...


7

There is no universal substitute for wheat flour. The challenges are, roughly, that recipes will often completely fail if you replace wheat flour with something else. The particular questions you've asked aren't really answerable in a concise way. Yes, taste, texture and aroma can all suffer; yes, baking temperatures can change; yes, making (bread) dough is ...


7

Hermetically sealed (airtight) containers. If it's not airtight you will eventually end up with flour bugs and they will move into to your non-airtight cornmeal container, and anything else they care to infest that isn't locked up tight. The old metal tins or quaint crockery are not adequate to prevent infestation, and sooner or later you'll buy some bag of ...


7

If you want to cast a wide net, searching for gluten-free bread might be your best here, even though is a wheat allergy rather than gluten intolerance, since removing the gluten necessarily means removing the wheat. Soy isn't too common an ingredient in breads so you should still be okay. And yes, you can make plenty of kinds of gluten-free bread at home, ...


6

You probably didn't knead the dough for long enough, so the gluten in the dough wasn't fully developed. There are two useful tests to determine if your dough has been kneaded properly. 1.The Poke Test Form the dough into a ball and, using a floured finger, give it a poke. If the indentation springs back, your dough is nearly ready - knead more lightly ...


6

Just as with kneading, stirring develops the gluten in the flour. over-mixing batter is a culinary no-no (fr. non-non). Batters are frequently rested in the refrigerator so the gluten can relax. Foods fried in batter that has been overworked and deprived of adequate rest is like a chef exposed to the same conditions–tough and tired. Whole wheat flour has ...


6

I make my own bread. Flour, water, yeast, salt. Nothing else. You could most certainly eat "your daily bread." Pasta is flour and eggs. You can also put dumplings into stew and chili - these are flour, milk or water, salt, and leavening like baking powder. So there is definitely no need for your wheat intake to include extra ingredients you would want to ...


6

Based on the appearance, that's bulgur (we eat a lot of bulgur). #3 size. The bran on cracked wheat is more opaque and sometimes more colorful. In bulgur, it's translucent as it is in your photo, and hard to distinguish from the endosperm.


5

At home I use bail closure jars (for flour, and all dry beans, lentils, pasta,...). They open and close easily, are airtight, and (most importantly) look sexy in the pantry or on the counter top ;-)


5

I have found the water roux or tangzhong method effective for 100% whole wheat bread, as it makes the texture less dense, and therefore less crumbly. Also, you may simply be using too little moisture overall. Now that I'm baking bread for a 2 year old, whose tastes lean slightly less rustic in bread than mine, I've rediscovered high-hydration loaves, which, ...


5

I think you're right that it wasn't mixed properly. Many types of whole wheat bread are actually partially whole wheat flour, partially white flour. That could just be some white flour that didn't get mixed. Alternatively, it could have been a clump of flour that either didn't get hydrated or didn't get yeast mixed in, so it didn't rise, and thus didn't ...


5

Part of the problem is that whole wheat flour goes rancid pretty quickly after it's milled (I believe it's from the natural oils in the germ). The usual advice is that whole wheat flour has a shelf life of six months or so, much less than white flour. If you're using old flour, try getting fresher stuff. If you're willing to go through extra effort, ...


5

Disclaimer: The following answer is aimed at wheat intolerance or allergy, not gluten intolerance. Sometimes the two terms are incorrectly used interchangeably, especially with some "trends" in diet. The suggestions below are not gluten-free, but wheat-free! Fluffy light sandwich breads rely on a gluten network to trap CO2 and steam and create a sponge-like ...


4

I'm going to assume that the primary question is "How can I make a flaky pie crust without wheat flour?" Note that recipe requests are off-topic on this site, but substitution questions are on-topic. The key thing which wheat flour gives you is gluten. Quinoa is gluten-free, so it's not going to help you much. However, there are ways of making gluten-free ...


4

The summary would be that there is a larger variety of flour (measured by gluten content) in the US than in Europe. SAJ14SAJ described the gluten categories of American flour, although exact figures for the category limits are hard to pin down. Peter Reinhart says cake flour has 6 to 7 percent gluten, pastry flour has 7.5 to 9.5 percent gluten, all-...


4

Much of the bitter taste in whole wheat products is a result of the hard red wheat used. In the last few years more companies like Bob's Red Mill, King Arthur Flours, and other have started distributing whole version of hard white wheat. A simple way to reduce the bitter flavor without decreasing the overall nutritional benefit of eat whole grain bread is ...


4

A super sticky dough is exactly what you want for pan pizza. Take a look at what Kenji from Serious Eats has to say about pan pizza dough. He uses a super-sticky, no-knead dough, but I bet yours would be fine for this application. I followed Kenji's advice to make this pizza, it was the best pan pizza I've ever had. Using the pan made dealing with the ...


4

I agree with previous answers that the stickiness is probably related to the long second proof at room temperature. I know because I often make use of a similar technique, though I use a higher hydration dough. Thus, it's probably close to as sticky as yours, even though I don't proof as long. After a first proof overnight (or for a couple days) in the ...


4

No, the recipe means that you should use whole wheat berries, not processed in any way. It's not wheat germ, which is a kind of cereal. My suggestion would be to use real wheat. If your regular supermarket doesn't carry it, an organic supermarket, a health store, or an ethnic store may have it. Then go on with the recipe as suggested. Using wheat germ ...


4

Almost all 'gluten free' breads lose much of their elasticity when they're cold ... in some cases, they'll crumble if you try using them for cold sandwiches, or they'll be so dry that you need lots of mayo on them. (mustard and other 'wet' condiments can cause them to break down, making things worse). If you're willing to do some cooking yourself, the ...


4

TL;DR: For cookies, use soft white wheat (or try mixing in spelt). And be aware that you may need to tweak some quantities of things like oil, baking powder, and sugar when you use different flours. There are several types of modern wheat readily available for milling. The basic divisions are Red or white Soft or hard Winter or spring Red means that the ...


4

Some of the earliest uses of wheat called for germinating the seed as part of the malting process, i.e. making malt in order to make beer. There's archeological evidence shows evidence of sprouted grains being used in malting kilns from the time of the ancient romans. In addition to beer, other traditional uses of malt, and therefore sprouted grains, ...


4

Just look for a "white" or "fine white" - many of the chapati flour companies make half a dozen types. Don't expect to find the full range at any of the "middle class" emporiums like Ocado, Sainsbury, etc, you'll have to dig a little deeper than that; but it depends where you live. My local Asda does 2 or 3 varieties, Sainsbury's... none. Personally, I don'...


4

The thing that makes bread chewy is gluten. The easiest way to make chewier bread would probably be to use flour with a higher gluten content. You've said you don't want to "add gluten" so I'll assume that option is not on the table. For the same reason, I'll assume that replacing some of the whole wheat flour with white flour (which has a higher ...


4

The question seems to confuse some terminology. Let's first clear some things up. Bulgur is NOT a grind size. It is a process. "Bulgur wheat" (in English anyway) refers to whole or cracked or crushed wheat berries that are parboiled and then dried. There are various sizes of bulgur sometimes available (e.g., coarse, medium, fine, etc., or sometimes ...


3

I can't say that this is the answer with 100% definitiveness, but I do have a theory that seems valid. Usually, flours are milled and ground with the endosperm, which contains most of the starch and protein. The germ contains proteins, fats, and vitamins and the bran is primarily fiber. The fats, vitamins, and fibers at a molecular level would contribute ...


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