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8

I bake extensively with whey protein concentrates and isolates. Well, to be clear, a combination of whey protein concentrates/isolates and other non-wheat type flours (flaxseed meal, almond flour, coconut flour, psyllium husk powder, etc.). One thing to mention right off the bat is that whey protein and gluten do not mix. Well, let me explain. In some of my ...


6

According to the US Department of Agriculture's FoodData, there is 0.76 g of protein in 100 g of acid whey (whey from drained yoghurt; whey from cheese production is "sweet"). According to the same source, a quart of acid whey weighs 984 g, so 24 fl oz weighs 738 g, and therefore contains 5.6 g or 0.2 oz of protein total. Even if none of it passed through ...


6

The major types of whey protein are: Whey protein concentrate. This has a protein content hovering around 75%. It has a fairly milky taste and smooth mouth feel. Whey protein isolate. This has closer to 90% protein. The taste is more neutral than WPC. Hydrolyzed whey protein, which has been processed to break apart proteins and make it more readily ...


4

I haven't baked with it myself, though I've used it in other recipes, and you don't provide links to specific recipes, but whey protein products are mostly very similar: the actual protein concentrate* and flavouring/sweeteners. You'll need to stick to a similar flavour for the recipe to be similar. This is especially true if it expects unflavoured: you ...


3

If you let the whey sit with the milk at proofing tempreatures (about 42 to 49 C for lactobacillicus bulgaricus, somewhat lower for bifidus, streptococcus delbrueckii and some other strains), you'll get yogurt again. In order to get your type of "curds" (corresponding to Russian tvorog, or German quark, or Indian paneer), you need to use acid and heat ...


3

Referring to whey protein, not specifically whey protein isolate, Carolyn Ketchum writes as follows: "I do not recommend using collagen peptides or collagen protein powder as a replacement for why or egg white protein....the baked goods always become quite gummy and difficult to cook through." Ultimate Guide to Keto Baking


3

I agree with Stephie here about the food safety aspect - if you use the freezer, it will be safe. The logistics of it are much more complicated than just washing it though, to the point where I don't think you are doing yourself any favors. First, you cannot dry it, or your towel will get all fatty. You will have to place a dripping wet shaker in the freezer,...


3

So let’s be clear - rinsing with just water won’t remove all of the fats and proteins in your container. It’s definitely not “clean” afterwards. But even for the bits left in the container food safety guidelines apply, so if you immediately freeze the shaker in between uses, you just have to add up the time the shaker spends in the danger zone and/or above ...


1

Yes you can/could (you're the king/queen of your kitchen, no one will come crashing through your door). But you shouldn't ... make a habit of cleaning it up after each use. No need to go nuclear, a few drops of cleaning liquid and hot water and a quick wash should be enough.


1

I do not know scientifically what the differences are when used in baking, but I have used collagen hydrosylate as a replacement for WPI in keto baking. I cannot tolerate dairy, so I have had no choice, and cannot compare the results directly. I saw the Bulletproof Blog using collagen hyrosylate in some recipes (which deflate), and there were no adverse ...


1

It's no different than the recommendation for other cheeses. I've seen suggestions to add to soup, or use in place of water during bread making.


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