34

There is no single, universal technique for making random food "fluffy". And you may have to live with significant changes in the recipe and in the final results if you try it. Classically, you have three types of foams. One is fat-based, the other is protein-based, the third depends on sudden gas production/dissolving. The fat-based foam is only ...


33

Circular saw will fill it with metal filings - not great for the mouthfeel, I'd think. Pliers aren't sharp enough to puncture. Can opener will have no lip to grab. Your first issue will be the container skidding out of your control - with potential for finger-loss & furniture damage. You're not going to easily find any implement you can squeeze slowly to ...


23

If you try to re-whip the cream now, it'll likely turn into butter, not whipped cream. The initial whipping process has already caused the fat in the cream to coalesce; further whipping now will complete that process, similar to if you had over-whipped the cream in the first place.


17

This may be the solution you’re looking for Make sure the pressure has all been released Lay canister on the counter with a towel underneath (or something to help keep it from sliding around). Or, place upside down in a stable container that won’t break or slide. Use church key to puncture the bottom. (Additional leverage may be required)


15

My suggestion would be to use a piping bag. You can get various tips so you can change up the swirls and lines as you like. Added by Jolenealaska: I hope you look at the comments and all of the answers here. I have used both pastry bags (many times), and a caulk-gun thing once before I threw it away. Disposable bags are not expensive unless you use a lot ...


15

You can explore "culinary foams" or "espumas". There are plenty of resources on this site and the internet. These can be made from many flavor bases, with the addition of ingredients that range from those found in your kitchen (egg whites) to ingredients you might have to purchase (a variety of hydrocholloids). There are many types of ...


14

Whipped cream is whipping cream after it has been whipped. Whipping cream is just cream with at least 30% fat content (that would be called Light Whipping Cream in the US). Heavy Whipping Cream contains at least 36% fat and up to 40% and rarely (in the US) even higher. Until these creams are whipped, they are just liquid. After they are whipped, they're ...


14

Because your goals are not entirely clear, I'll assume that you are approaching this from an angle of waste reduction. Likely, you have run out of N2O on several occasions and you want to use it all up. I think your best bet is to stop buying cans of whipped cream and start buying cartons of heavy whipping cream. It's cheaper, requires no N2O to whip up, and ...


12

Place in the fridge with something holding the top down. Leave for 15 minutes. As it cools, it will suck in air. Remove from fridge and wait until it warms up. A small quantity will be released. Repeat until all is purged.


11

If you are trying to make chocolate frosting using whipped cream, you need to: Whip the cream first. Melt the chocolate and add some amount of whipped cream to the melted chocolate (mix it by cut and fold method) Add this mixture to the remaining whipped cream and fold it. Don't over-mix it, it would knock out the air from the whipped cream. To make ...


10

Those look like air pockets - you're using an unusual whisk, perhaps it can't get enough "bite" on the stainless steel bowl to pop them, whereas the plastic bowl's texture offers enough resistance. I'd try it with a balloon whisk rather than a spiral whisk, and see if that helps. Here's a breakdown on whisks and their uses from Craftsy.


10

The chaulk gun for kitchens is called cookie press and looks like this: I know that some use it to decorate cakes and with whipped cream, too (some come with decorating tips, some don't), but IMHO it's a wiser idea to learn how to handle a pastry bag - the results will be better with sufficient practise. But if you should have problems with your hands or ...


9

It's difficult to say what exactly happened to your cream so it got lumpy, but it's quite possible that it's overbeaten. When making chocolate whipped cream you should make sure to chill the mixture thoroughly. I always let mine stay in the fridge over night. This of course only works if you mix enough cream with the chocolate, otherwise it gets too hard ...


8

Yes, this is possible but you need a high-speed blender like a Thermomix or Vitamix to do so. There's actually a recipe on the Thermomix website: http://www.ukthermomix.com/recshow.php?rec_id=29 Ingredients 250 gm unsalted butter 250 gm milk (full cream or semi-skimmed) Method Weigh butter in pieces and milk into the Thermomix bowl. Cook 3 minutes/ 90C/ ...


8

Cream does last quite a while in the fridge, especially before it's opened - it has a pretty high fat content. So you may be able to buy it when you can, and still have it around when you want it. Failing that, honestly, I think that anything you can do with milk and additives is probably not going to be nearly as good as actual whipped cream, so you might ...


8

This site explains two methods of making whipping cream from milk. The first is by manipulating store-bought milk, by adding gelatin, temperature and a lot of stirring. The second is by separating the cream out of raw milk. The site claims that the result of both methods can be used for whipped cream. A third method I sometimes use when a recipe asks for a ...


8

Heavy whipping cream is homogenized as @myklbykl mentions. That means the fat molecules are pretty evenly dispersed throughout the liquid parts, giving you a smooth mixture instead of one that separates. When you whip cream, you don't just incorporate air. You also agitate those fat molecules and they start sticking together. As long as you keep whipping ...


7

We just experienced the same phenomenon, and we were able to confirm that the specks were NOT bubbles - if we were careful enough, we could isolate the flecks. They came in different shapes - some were specks, but some were almost filaments. We have a stainless steel bowl, but we suspect the whisk was aluminum. Since aluminum is Mohs hardness 2-2.9 and ...


6

I don't know how to tell what the pressure is on a whipper, but from the results of a blocked one, I'm going to make the following suggestion for attempting to safely disarm it: You need containment. If you open the container too quickly, you're looking at a massive mess to clean up. I'd suggest possibly a cardboard box (disposible) or a large plastic ...


6

Coconut milk is made of different components, like water, fat, minerals and protein. All those components have a different mass and when let sit in the fridge for some time, the components with higher mass (protein) tend to sink to the bottom as they are pulled by gravity and the components with lower mass float to the top (water, fat). The same happens ...


6

Sigh, I was trying to avoid answering this, but feel compelled to provide some information after all your revisions. I'm answering only this part of the question: Can someone explain what these are: (maltodextrin, inulin (chicory extract), cellulose, mono- and diglycerides polysorbate 80, artificial flavors, carrageenan) Let's break that down: ...


6

Sneftel answered the question you asked, but to answer a corollary question: you can prevent this from happening by using a stabilizer (also called a cream stiffener). One you can get is by Dr. Oetker and is called Whip It (or Sahnesteif). There are a few other alternatives as well.


5

Your best bet is probably gelatin stabilized whipped cream. This recipe from Wilton gives you an example of how to proceed. You can google many other results. Depending on your tastes, to compliment gingerbread, you may also consider some alternate frostings which will hold up better at room temperature and taste great: White chocolate ganache (sample ...


5

There are any number of combinations of hydrocolloid agents that can be used to simulate the viscosity and other properties of dairy cream without the fat or even the dairy. "Modernist Cuisine" by Myhrvold includes a recipe for low fat "cream" which combines skim milk with l-carrageenan, cellulose gum, and whey powder; as well as a recipe for non-dairy ...


5

No, it won't work. Michael's comment explains why. Whipping cream is not just fat and water mixed, it is fat and water emulsified. This is a big difference. If you had some special reason to do this on a regular basis, you could get it to work by adding emulsifiers. You can beat any fat with water and lecithine or xanthan and get a creamy result. As far ...


5

While a cookie press would at least have the nominal excuse of being multi-purpose1, it's... awkward to use for icing/whipped cream. What you might have been thinking of is an icing syringe (aka piping syringe, cake decorator press, or various non-informative names like "Dessert Decorator Pro").     While a decorating bag is vastly more useful,...


5

Carrageenan is a natural thickening agent. It helps the cream beat more easily and stay fluffy. I have seen brands that don't have it but I agree with Marti that you might have to try a health food store. Egg whites do not beat to nearly the same consistency. They are much more foamy. If beaten all the way they are more stiff. If you are using the whipped ...


5

There are two things you can do to make the mousse stiffer: Reduce the water from the fruit. So use some kind of concentrate instead of the pure fruit. For example, you could cook down a syrup or jam and add it to the mousse. Or see if dehydrating juice gets you somewhere. Use more fat. Instead of whipping cream at 30 to 35% fat, you could use double-...


5

No, because the bottle would explode off the Soda Stream, spraying cream and foam all over your kitchen. Per the Soda Stream FAQ: No. Only water should be carbonated in the SodaStream Sparkling Water Maker. You risk damaging your Sparkling Water Maker, not to mention making a big fizzy mess! The money-back guarantee and the warranty are both invalidated ...


5

No. You'd have to be able to fully homogenize the butter and milk back together first, which you're not going to be able to do. You can melt butter and add it to milk to make heavy cream for some cooking needs, but it won't whip. Half and half will whip if you get it cold enough, but it's not going to be nearly as stable as whipping cream.


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