24

N2O is more stable than CO2. Mixing N2O with water or cream won't create diffetent molecules. If the liquid you add N2O is not very thick (as water) the gas and liquid will separate in two. If it is thick, as with cream, the gas will get trapped in it. You can see the proccess with more detail in this question. CO2 reacts with water (H2O) making H2CO3 (...


15

My suggestion would be to use a piping bag. You can get various tips so you can change up the swirls and lines as you like. Added by Jolenealaska: I hope you look at the comments and all of the answers here. I have used both pastry bags (many times), and a caulk-gun thing once before I threw it away. Disposable bags are not expensive unless you use a lot ...


12

Whipped cream is whipping cream after it has been whipped. Whipping cream is just cream with at least 30% fat content (that would be called Light Whipping Cream in the US). Heavy Whipping Cream contains at least 36% fat and up to 40% and rarely (in the US) even higher. Until these creams are whipped, they are just liquid. After they are whipped, they're ...


11

If you are trying to make chocolate frosting using whipped cream, you need to: Whip the cream first. Melt the chocolate and add some amount of whipped cream to the melted chocolate (mix it by cut and fold method) Add this mixture to the remaining whipped cream and fold it. Don't over-mix it, it would knock out the air from the whipped cream. To make ...


10

A general rule-of-thumb is that a butterfat content of 30% or more is required to produce whipped cream. Half and half (called half cream in the UK), which is comprised of half milk and half cream has a butterfat content between 10 - and 12.5% butterfat, based on various sources discovered in my research. That being said, I've read that half and half can ...


9

Those look like air pockets - you're using an unusual whisk, perhaps it can't get enough "bite" on the stainless steel bowl to pop them, whereas the plastic bowl's texture offers enough resistance. I'd try it with a balloon whisk rather than a spiral whisk, and see if that helps. Here's a breakdown on whisks and their uses from Craftsy.


9

The chaulk gun for kitchens is called cookie press and looks like this: I know that some use it to decorate cakes and with whipped cream, too (some come with decorating tips, some don't), but IMHO it's a wiser idea to learn how to handle a pastry bag - the results will be better with sufficient practise. But if you should have problems with your hands or ...


9

It's difficult to say what exactly happened to your cream so it got lumpy, but it's quite possible that it's overbeaten. When making chocolate whipped cream you should make sure to chill the mixture thoroughly. I always let mine stay in the fridge over night. This of course only works if you mix enough cream with the chocolate, otherwise it gets too hard ...


8

Corn starch only thickens when heated to 180 F, so it probably is not helping at all with your whipped cream. I live in the US, so I cannot compare to whipped cream in the UK. Whipped cream for cake fillings is often beaten almost to the breaking point to make the foam as thick as possible. I assume you are whipping the cream sufficiently, and it still ...


8

The brands that used to work may have changed their formulation in response to carageenan shortages. If they use less emulsifier, a lower quality product, or different emulsifiers such as guar gum, locust bean, or xanthan gum, the stability of the whipped cream may suffer. If the cream you can get isn't stable enough, you can add unflavored gelatin to ...


8

Cream does last quite a while in the fridge, especially before it's opened - it has a pretty high fat content. So you may be able to buy it when you can, and still have it around when you want it. Failing that, honestly, I think that anything you can do with milk and additives is probably not going to be nearly as good as actual whipped cream, so you might ...


8

This site explains two methods of making whipping cream from milk. The first is by manipulating store-bought milk, by adding gelatin, temperature and a lot of stirring. The second is by separating the cream out of raw milk. The site claims that the result of both methods can be used for whipped cream. A third method I sometimes use when a recipe asks for a ...


7

Yes, this is possible but you need a high-speed blender like a Thermomix or Vitamix to do so. There's actually a recipe on the Thermomix website: http://www.ukthermomix.com/recshow.php?rec_id=29 Ingredients 250 gm unsalted butter 250 gm milk (full cream or semi-skimmed) Method Weigh butter in pieces and milk into the Thermomix bowl. ...


6

I am expecting my whipping siphon in the mail this afternoon. They are obviously intended for creating whip cream instantly but I find that it's best to think of this contraption as a pressurized chamber which affords you many different culinary options. Using the pressure will allow you to make instant infusions of different liquids and oils. The general ...


6

Cream whippers cleaning is not difficult, but rather heavy going, as what you usually fill them with are thick liquids. But you can clean the canister with a bottle brush and then follow the tips given in this answer on cleaning flasks. You'd also have to clean the tip and the o-ring joints, but it's easy to do so with the pressure of a normal water tap. ...


6

No, it won't work. Michael's comment explains why. Whipping cream is not just fat and water mixed, it is fat and water emulsified. This is a big difference. If you had some special reason to do this on a regular basis, you could get it to work by adding emulsifiers. You can beat any fat with water and lecithine or xanthan and get a creamy result. As far ...


6

I don't know how to tell what the pressure is on a whipper, but from the results of a blocked one, I'm going to make the following suggestion for attempting to safely disarm it: You need containment. If you open the container too quickly, you're looking at a massive mess to clean up. I'd suggest possibly a cardboard box (disposible) or a large plastic ...


6

We just experienced the same phenomenon, and we were able to confirm that the specks were NOT bubbles - if we were careful enough, we could isolate the flecks. They came in different shapes - some were specks, but some were almost filaments. We have a stainless steel bowl, but we suspect the whisk was aluminum. Since aluminum is Mohs hardness 2-2.9 and ...


6

Coconut milk is made of different components, like water, fat, minerals and protein. All those components have a different mass and when let sit in the fridge for some time, the components with higher mass (protein) tend to sink to the bottom as they are pulled by gravity and the components with lower mass float to the top (water, fat). The same happens ...


6

Sigh, I was trying to avoid answering this, but feel compelled to provide some information after all your revisions. I'm answering only this part of the question: Can someone explain what these are: (maltodextrin, inulin (chicory extract), cellulose, mono- and diglycerides polysorbate 80, artificial flavors, carrageenan) Let's break that down: ...


5

The cream whipped by NO2 is less stable than cream whipped by a mixer, and will liquefy rather soon. If you have ever bought a cream "spray bottle", you know how the whipped product behaves. You also have to find a supply for the gas cartridges and store them somewhere. Most people don't have a problem with that, but if you are short on shelf/storage space,...


5

Your best bet is probably gelatin stabilized whipped cream. This recipe from Wilton gives you an example of how to proceed. You can google many other results. Depending on your tastes, to compliment gingerbread, you may also consider some alternate frostings which will hold up better at room temperature and taste great: White chocolate ganache (sample ...


5

While a cookie press would at least have the nominal excuse of being multi-purpose1, it's... awkward to use for icing/whipped cream. What you might have been thinking of is an icing syringe (aka piping syringe, cake decorator press, or various non-informative names like "Dessert Decorator Pro").     While a decorating bag is vastly more useful,...


5

There are two things you can do to make the mousse stiffer: Reduce the water from the fruit. So use some kind of concentrate instead of the pure fruit. For example, you could cook down a syrup or jam and add it to the mousse. Or see if dehydrating juice gets you somewhere. Use more fat. Instead of whipping cream at 30 to 35% fat, you could use double-...


4

Things to check: Seal. If the seal is broken/erroded gas will be able to escape and will therefore not whip your cream - giving you a liquid. Canister (Charge) - Are you using a fresh charge (ie. NOS canister)? While it is unlikely, it is possible that you have either a dud box or it has somehow become damaged. Position - Are you holding it correctly? ...


4

Add gelatine - that's what commercial thickened cream is - cream with gelatin, lightly beat to incorporate, then let it set. Beat before using (not to whipped-cream level - just to get it to move :) Use one leaf of gelatin dissolved in a tablespoon of warmed water for each pint of cream.


4

You can thicken Canadian 35% whipping cream by dehydrating it with dried apples. Place (natural) dried apple slices, loosely packed, in a sealer and add cream to cover. Refrigerate for 24 hours. The cream that is in direct contact with the apples will become very thick and greasy and you will have to squeeze it off with your fingers. Messy. Remix the ...


4

You're right about the fat content of whipping cream. English Double Cream has a typical fat content of around 48% compared to the thickest cream in N America which is heavy cream at about 35%. You could try using crème de mais, a modified cornstarch which doesn't require any heat to thicken. I think its trade name is Clear Jel.


4

There are any number of combinations of hydrocolloid agents that can be used to simulate the viscosity and other properties of dairy cream without the fat or even the dairy. "Modernist Cuisine" by Myhrvold includes a recipe for low fat "cream" which combines skim milk with l-carrageenan, cellulose gum, and whey powder; as well as a recipe for non-dairy ...


4

Plain whipped cream is somewhat problematic as an icing. It doesn't hold shapes well, and it begins to deflate and weep after just a few hours, even in the refrigerator. There are a number of ways to make stabilized whipped cream, which is more durable and pipes better. Here is a recipe from Wilton. It uses gelatin to stabilize the whipped cream. The recipe ...


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