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7

Since the recipe call for sweet riesling, I'd replace the wine with white grape juice.


5

Sangria doesn't have "fizzy pop" of any description in it. It has brandy. That was where it went wrong, long before the sweetener stage. Sugar of any description is optional, though personally I'd rather stick my head in a fire than put artificial sweeteners in it, I'd just rather it without anything. Rioja - Tempranillo, Garnacha etc Brandy Fruit ...


4

Many people have already suggested making your Sangria the more traditional way by just adding pieces of fruit rather than concentrated fruit juices— depending on why you are attempting to eliminate the sugars (e.g. for health reasons) this might be the best approach. Another option might be to zest some fruits or use a potato peeler to take long strips of ...


3

Make a lateral move to passion fruit juice. It has a unique flavor that would really go well with the rest of this dessert. It will bring something not present in the original but since you are ditching sweet wine and lemon, you need some razzamatazz and passion fruit has got it. Plus the passion in passion fruit actually refers to the passion of Christ, ...


3

Tomatoes can be fermented, and many folks enjoy the result, using them in savory culinary applications To make a wine, you would probably want to add some ingredients to balance the acidity that most tomatoes bring to the final product. Here is an example of one such recipe, but I am sure there are others.


3

Julia Child's "classic" recipe for beurre blanc uses quite a lot of butter (3 sticks) to 1/4 cup each of white wine and white wine vinegar (plus shallot and salt and pepper, with a squeeze of lemon to finish). I suspect that you (a) used too much liquid, and (b) used the wrong vinegar, leading to an overly sour/acetic sauce.


3

Any variation of the swiss holy trinity (lardon, cheese and potatoes) is good, but for maximum wow factor, see if you can rent a raclette oven or two and have someone stand by it and slide the molten cheese on people's plates : Downside is you need a raclette officer on duty (can be done by anyone, its not hard)


2

Have a google for Raclette or Tartiflette (or anything from the Savoyard region of France). Most mountainous dishes involve the involve the cheese "Reblochon" over some form of boiled potatoes. Although once considered the poor mans dish in the mountains, they are now vastly populor and there are many variations for the reciepe online. My reciepe is: Rub ...


2

It is possible. The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations classes wine as grape wine, citrus wine, or fruit wine; as examples of labelling of citrus wine containing only one fruit it mentions orange wine and grapefruit wine. However, the Wikipedia page on fruit wine notes that it's difficult to make, and it's normal for some of the citric acid to be neutralised.


2

IF avoiding sugars. I would avoid Wine altogether as it contains sugar naturally. Otherwise, you would probably be better off just creating real Sangria. One option, if you absolutely need an "non-sugar" option, would be to mix the wine with a fruity juice that is sugar-free. Also, not all wines are going to mix well, I would try to get a basic table red ...


1

I can't with good conscious give advice outside of USDA guides or similar authority as Sneftel does with the pH numbers. I will not however that in jellies, and wine, there are other factors at work in addition to pH. There is alcohol assuming it is not cooked out, and sugar content both of which act as potential preservatives. I do not have tested, ...


1

White wine is most likely acidic enough to be safe. The standard pH level quoted for botulism safety is 4.6; if your jelly measures lower than that (after cooking and canning, not before) then you're good to go. Remember that if you were planning to store all the jars for a while, you'll need to sacrifice one jar to test the pH. Until you have your recipe ...


1

It looks like the wine is used in the gelatin topping, where it is used as a flavoring. You could substitute any fruit-flavored essence (note many of these are dissolved in alcohol), though you would need to substitute water for most of the volume as concentrated essences are very strong. As white cranberry juice is the base for this layer, you could just ...


1

I would avoid using red wine in a recipe that calls for white. Whites and Reds taste different, so you should expect a switch from white to red to be reflected in the finished dish. And, it will also change the color/presentation. I was taught that white wine can be substituted with water and vinegar mixed in equal amounts, along with a small amount of sugar ...


1

I warm glasses of red in winter. About 5 to 8 seconds on high does the trick. I think it improves the drinking experience.


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