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25

There's a few misconceptions there. Tartaric acid, malic acid, acetic acid, and citric acid are all "heat stable" in the sense that they won't boil or decompose at the temperature of boiling water. They'll evaporate over time, just like the water will, but if you take a bunch of lemon juice and boil it down, you'll eventually be left with a ...


20

In general, when meat or vegetables are fried in hot fat, sugar and amino acid particles are formed. To capture this roasted aroma caused by this reaction (called Maillard reaction), you pour water or wine over your beef. So the main reason for deglazing is to capture this special taste of "roast". The reason why you add the wine directly after ...


19

In general, we can assume that it will never boil off to zero. By a combination of reduction and dilution we can get to undetectable levels, less than in ripe fruit and some breads. The "zero BAC" requirement has to be able to handle people eating normal foods, so tends to have some margin, just not enough to have a drink. To do this you'd simmer ...


12

As a general rule, the answer by Chris H is accurate. Most recipes that involve wine only use a small amount and typically involve cooking in a way that causes most of the alcohol to evaporate (or combust if it’s a flambé), and in general they will have no more impact on BAC than a cup of fruit juice would. In cases where it really matters you can indeed get ...


6

Marinades are generally surface treatments, especially in thicker cuts. With the exception of salt (if any in the marinade), I doubt your chicken has absorbed any marinade. So, your issue is the higher quantity of liquid, and flavoring of the wine. I think you could go either way...remove some, or reduce. If it were me (so as not to be wasteful), I would ...


6

In addition to @kitukwfyer's answer. There's quite a bit of biology that goes on here... Not only are you influencing the competition, you are actively selecting for organisms that grow well under the conditions. This is the real reason brewing (and bread etc) works better with a starter culture. There are a few things influencing this: With a starter ...


5

I don't know nearly enough to answer properly, but I know a few things that might be interesting. I can tell you that the initial ferment takes longer because of the decreased amount of water compared to other recipes. Microbes need water to live too after all. And in this batch you likely have more yeast than LAB... but you probably have both because LAB ...


2

Versus literally means "green juice" in French (I know there's a "te" in French, but it's not pronounced). From Wikipedia: Verjus is a highly acidic juice made by pressing unripe grapes, crab-apples or other sour fruit. So versus is sour juice, nothing more, and we should treat it like so in our research for food safety. From StillTasty:...


2

Baking soda works perfect it saved me many times :) but you need to be very careful with the amount it has to just a little bit. I’m adding no more than 1/4 of a tea spoon and it’s enough for a saucepan with a dinner for two.


2

I am from Burgundy and I have never heard of flambéing the beef bourguignon! But after all why not. It is definitely possible to flambé wine, and it does make the process of "burning" the alcohol faster, and it will give it a stronger taste. Regarding your last beef bourguignon you made, if it was too "alcoholy", how long did you let it ...


1

You can flambé wine when it's hot enough. We use this method for making a red wine reduction sauce (a slow boil for a while until the gas burner ignites the vapors, then continue to reduce). The majority of the alcohol burns off but there will still be a small amount present once the flame dies. After this point, the alcohol taste will not be clearly ...


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