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33

The whole idea of adding the yeast before kneading is to be able to mix it uniformly. By adding the yeast after the dough is formed, it will be mechanically more difficult to combine it and you might end up with lumps of yeastless dough. Those lumps won't rise. I suspect your bread will have a denser, non uniform crumb.


23

Milk does create gluten1 when combined with flour. The water in the milk does create a gluten structure. If it didn't, any bread made with milk would be dense and flat. But the dinner rolls I made yesterday (with no water, only milk) were light and airy. Milk clearly creates gluten. Note that gluten isn't only about elasticity. Beginning bread makers ...


22

Commercially produced yeast has been around since the mid-late 1800s, and the commercial strains we use today have been around since the 40s while Ciabatta was invented in 1982. So while ciabatta seems like it's a very old traditional thing it is relatively new, and commercial yeast was widely available.


15

There is a difference between resting and proofing. Resting allows flour to absorb water and lets the gluten that was formed during kneading to relax. Both of these make it possible to work with the dough. Proofing is letting yeast produce CO2 to raise the dough. Yeast doughs do both in the rest period after they are kneaded. Unyeasted, glutinous, doughs ...


11

Let's start with what Gluten development actually is. It's the process of developing the protein in flour, gluten, into a web that traps air into it. Water is essential for this web, and as you mention 87% of milk is water. However, 3% of milk (whole milk, at least) is fat. This fat will coat the gluten molecules, preventing them from being shaped into a ...


9

Yes, you can add instant yeast to a sourdough. However, the fact that you used AP vs bread flour should not have much to do with the fermentation activity. The different flours have different protein contents, which impact gluten development. Certainly, allowing it to ferment overnight is an option, but if you are short on time you can use an instant yeast ...


8

The bread improvers that I have seen simply encourage gluten development to improve bread texture. They are often called for for use in bread machines because those machines are not as effective at kneading. Many bread improvers are as simple as extra vitamin C. Without knowing the details of the machine you are planning to use it is difficult to say whether ...


8

Absolutely there is a way to propagate yeast, it's as simple as making a starter with it. Most of the time these days people create starters for sourdough using natural yeasts, but you can use them to feed any kind of yeast. All you would do is put flour and water in a container with some yeast, let it get to work and once you start to get bubbles put it in ...


7

No, the bacteria in yogurt will not serve as the primary leavening agent for dough.


7

Don't do this. A sourdough starter contains several strains of yeast and bacteria in a fairly delicate balance. These consume sugars and produce CO2 and a range of byproducts. Commercial yeast is a different species of yeast, engineered to eat and reproduce much faster than any of the wild yeasts in your starter. Adding commercial yeast to a starter will ...


6

This should not impact your rise at all, unless the container is too small to allow for dough expansion. In which case, you might have a mess on your hands. Many people (me included) use sealable containers, though I more frequently just use a clean kitchen towel (a plate would work too), the idea is just to keep the dough from drying.


6

If you add yeast after you develop the gluten you will have to knead a lot to make sure it is distributed throughout, and you will end up overkneading your dough leading to a tough result. Kneading is only one thing that develops gluten, yeast assists in gluten development by opening up the structure when it releases CO2. Opening up the structure allows ...


6

Due to Coronavirus, it has been impossible to find baking yeast. So I bought some packets of this online thinking I might be able to use them to make bread. I was a bit put off when reading that it is not to be used for making bread, but being a biologist and home brewer I figured the yeast couldn’t be that much different than regular old Sacchromyces. I ...


6

Yes, rising is very dependent on gluten. In almost all cases, you won't get any rising without a gluten-rich flour. Even if you use wheat flour, but one that has the wrong proportion of gluten, you will get a disappointing rise. If you were to try making a bread recipe calling for AP flour (8-10% gluten) with bagel flour (14-15% gluten) or a recipe for bread ...


6

You can't directly make whole milk out of lowfat milk and milkfat. But if you like, you can try adding back some fat to the recipe -- melted butter or vegetable oil -- at the concentration of, I suppose, 2.5%. (If the recipe already includes one of these, just increase the amount.) The result will not be quite the same, but will be very close. In a yeasted ...


5

Because I have been home brewing for about 30 years, I do it a different way. I sterilize sugar and water by boiling, cool to room temperature, pour into a sterilized 1 gallon jug, put a little bread yeast in it, and put a rubber stopper w an airlock on top. When it’s done, I pour off most of the nasty beer (sugar only with bread yeast makes a nasty brew ...


5

Yeast is a living thing. If your yeast was exposed to conditions that killed or damaged it, most likely extreme temperatures, you will not get the results you expect regardless of the date stamped on the container. On the other hand, just because it's past the date on the jar, the yeast hasn't necessarily kicked the bucket yet. Related: Does active dry ...


5

It is certainly possible to culture commercial yeast using the same method as a sourdough starter, but adding the yeast at the first step: see e.g. Culturing Yeast in Dough and Baking lots of bread - keeping a yeast starter. Your starter will also pick up natural bacteria, giving it some of the sourdough tang. The commercial yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ...


5

You can't substitute a non-wheat flour for a wheat flour and expect similar baking properties; bread doughs rely on gluten for their structure which is why gluten-free baking is difficult. The simplest way to fix this would be to double the recipe, look at what you've already added, and add more ingredients up to the correct amounts. You can freeze bread ...


4

No, you need industrial machinery. Part of the manufacturing process of producing Vegemite involves using a centrifuge to separate out the yeast cell membranes from the rest of the product. As a result, without access to such a centrifuge, it is not possible to make Vegemite. Here is a description of the process I found through a Google search: Spent ...


4

Adding baking soda won't help you at this point, for a variety of reasons. First, it won't have any acid to react with. Technically, baking powder clears that bar, but since it fails at the next ones, it is not a reasonable alternative. Second, you won't be able to mix in the powder properly in already-kneaded dough. If you really attempted to use it, ...


4

Coconut flour is extremely absorbent (see my answer here). Given that you went half and half, that means 2 cups of coconut flour or around 225 g. Added to the 2 cups of AP flour (250 g), that's around 475 g of total flour. To even have a chance at making a workable dough, I'd estimate at the bare minimum, you'd want a 200% hydration rate. That means roughly ...


3

You can't really "make" yeast. It must be cultured in the appropriate medium. Yeast can be purchased in freeze dried or fresh form and added to flour and other ingredients for baking. You can also culture yeast by creating and maintaining a starter. As of two years ago there was no commercially produced genetically modified wheat, at least in the US. I ...


3

You could instead try making your own Marmite. Excerpts copied from MsMarmiteLover's Blog - HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN MARMITE Please read the whole piece for more background. My role as MsMarmitelover meant that I was able to go straight to the top: after some negotiation with the Marmite authorities, I was given a telephone date with St.John O. ...


3

I agree with @moscafj. However, one consideration might be anaerobic respiration rather than aerobic - resulting in some alcohol being produced. Over normal rising times I don't think this will reach any level that might either kill the yeast (around 10-12% usually) or produce intoxication of the consumer, but it might well produce a moderate amount of ...


3

The answer is, as you suspected, you killed your yeast. If you look at your original description of the process, you add the yeast to flour, along with salt and then add hot water, the flour is presumably room temperature, so it acts as a cooling agent and spreads the heat out so that most of the yeast survives and the final mixture is about body temp (37 ...


3

From a food safety perspective, 48h in the fridge will be perfectly safe. (You may want to check out our generic post on storage times.) Whether it’ll work with regards to intensifying or improving the flavor, I can’t say. Remember that the “more flavor” in regular slow-raise bread is based on enzymatic activity in the flour - which you don’t use. It may or ...


3

This article estimates 20 billion viable yeast cells per gram of dried yeast. A yeast package is about 7 grams total. The granule size will vary from brand to brand. Even within a packet, granule size is not completely uniform. To get the estimate, you'd need to weigh out a sample (say 1g or 0.1g), count the number of granules in that sample, then do the ...


3

I would let it prove overnight in the fridge rather than adding instant yeast which is a different variety of yeast that will be competing with your sourdough yeast.


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