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33

The whole idea of adding the yeast before kneading is to be able to mix it uniformly. By adding the yeast after the dough is formed, it will be mechanically more difficult to combine it and you might end up with lumps of yeastless dough. Those lumps won't rise. I suspect your bread will have a denser, non uniform crumb.


15

There is a difference between resting and proofing. Resting allows flour to absorb water and lets the gluten that was formed during kneading to relax. Both of these make it possible to work with the dough. Proofing is letting yeast produce CO2 to raise the dough. Yeast doughs do both in the rest period after they are kneaded. Unyeasted, glutinous, doughs ...


6

Unfortunately many kinds of fermentation produce CO2 as a byproduct, so the presence of bubbles hardly give you more information than 'it is alive'. If what you want is a precise identification of what strain of yeast and bacteria are present in your starter, I see no easier way than looking under a microscope or making a laboratory analysis. If you just ...


6

If you add yeast after you develop the gluten you will have to knead a lot to make sure it is distributed throughout, and you will end up overkneading your dough leading to a tough result. Kneading is only one thing that develops gluten, yeast assists in gluten development by opening up the structure when it releases CO2. Opening up the structure allows ...


5

This is short for “1 large cake of yeast.” According to this investigation, cakes of yeast traditionally came in two sizes: Small, around 3/5 of an ounce Large, around 2 ounces This similar recipe gives the substitution “1 large yeast or 3 envelopes dry yeast.”’


5

It’s too yeasty because you are putting too much yeast in. Yes, the majority of recipes states one 7g sachet per 500g, but that will give you a yeasty taste. It will also give you quite quick results. As a first step, I suggest you consider a cold rise - reduce the yeast to 1-2% fresh (or about 3g of dry yeast), use cool instead of warm liquid and let the ...


5

Is there a very special reason you want to bake it in a bread pan? The recipe is solid enough to be baked free-standing, in any bread shape you like - batard, boule, and all the fancy ones. It actually will be way too dry if you tried to incorporate the whole flour (but notice it does not direct you to do so). So you can shape, proof and bake completely ...


5

This should not impact your rise at all, unless the container is too small to allow for dough expansion. In which case, you might have a mess on your hands. Many people (me included) use sealable containers, though I more frequently just use a clean kitchen towel (a plate would work too), the idea is just to keep the dough from drying.


4

Do as you said. Cover and put the second batch of dough in the refrigerator. It will slow the rise process but, when you take it out, it will rise just as well as the other did but it will need more time to do so as the dough needs to warm back up. The timing will involve how long it takes for your pan to cool down before you can place the second batch of ...


4

Basic room temperature breads don't prove in 6 or 12 hours, 30 minutes to 2 hours is more typical. The overall process from start to finish including baking may be 6 hours. Sourdough breads and enriched doughs like brioche and challah can take much longer to prove at room temperature. As for calculations no, there's no straightforward time conversion ...


4

I have marked George M's answer as the accepted answer, but I thought I would post a slightly expanded answer. I can confirm that the following ideas that were raised in the comments did not work: Hotter oven Cooking longer Cooling completely What has worked is to wrap the bread completely in a tea towel or two until completely cool. Then, the bread ...


3

You could instead try making your own Marmite. Excerpts copied from MsMarmiteLover's Blog - HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN MARMITE Please read the whole piece for more background. My role as MsMarmitelover meant that I was able to go straight to the top: after some negotiation with the Marmite authorities, I was given a telephone date with St.John O. ...


3

No, you need industrial machinery. Part of the manufacturing process of producing Vegemite involves using a centrifuge to separate out the yeast cell membranes from the rest of the product. As a result, without access to such a centrifuge, it is not possible to make Vegemite. Here is a description of the process I found through a Google search: Spent ...


3

So the recipe in baker's percents: Flour 100% cold water 80% olive oil 4% salt 2% instant dry yeast 0.2% This looks like a high-hydration Sicilian-style dough that's calling for a 24 hour cold ferment (CF). As you can see in such a recipe, the yeast level is very low -- so low that you're unlikely to ...


3

In general you should be fine, I would give this dough more time to warm/"re-proof" on the counter before shaping/ baking. I've seen something similar in other doughs, but I don't know what caused it. I don't expect much proofing in the fridge, and I've seen some weird stages when I try to slow a proof in the fridge (start a dough then finish it the next ...


3

Batch baking for economies of scale is a worthy goal but since you have only 1 pan in this shape you won't be able to get that shape for both AND bake in a single batch. I agree that staging (baking half 1st then the other half later) presents some problems. So, I would suggest... Use another shape pan with similar volume (ie 8" or 9" cake or pie pan) ...


3

If started from packaged yeast, over time, your local wild strains will probably take over. The same is true if you start with a starter from someone else or the dried sourdough starter packages. But, it takes longer even than starting from scratch more than likely for them to slowly replace the current strains. I would suggest following the link Spagirl ...


3

The answer is, as you suspected, you killed your yeast. If you look at your original description of the process, you add the yeast to flour, along with salt and then add hot water, the flour is presumably room temperature, so it acts as a cooling agent and spreads the heat out so that most of the yeast survives and the final mixture is about body temp (37 ...


3

You can't really "make" yeast. It must be cultured in the appropriate medium. Yeast can be purchased in freeze dried or fresh form and added to flour and other ingredients for baking. You can also culture yeast by creating and maintaining a starter. As of two years ago there was no commercially produced genetically modified wheat, at least in the US. I ...


3

Yes it does - here's the reason why: Yeast need some salt to grow properly, but they only need a very small amount (see 3rd para of intro). When you added the salt to the wet mix (sponge), you made it into a high enough concentration to inhibit the growth of the yeast, so it didn't reach the log-phase growth that you would expect when generating a sponge ...


3

Adding baking soda won't help you at this point, for a variety of reasons. First, it won't have any acid to react with. Technically, baking powder clears that bar, but since it fails at the next ones, it is not a reasonable alternative. Second, you won't be able to mix in the powder properly in already-kneaded dough. If you really attempted to use it, ...


2

I don't weigh out anything. I go by looks and feel. Too much water and it will bubble but not rise. The gas escapes because the dough is too thin to capture the gas. I just had a starter bubbling for 3 days. This morning I fed it less water so it was like a thick pancake batter and it doubled in 1 hour. It floated like a cork! I took pictures of it ...


2

You're missing a step. You have to let them proof after forming them into rings. Just like how for bread making you always have to double proof, or else it'll be like pizza or pita dough. After that they should be fine, just take care not to handle them too aggressively while moving to and from the boiling water (Again, just like bread. You deflate the ...


2

The concern here is that this is something unexpected and potentially harmful. The general rule is - if in doubt, throw it out! Many microorganisms will grow quite happily and form a whitish sediment below a liquid layer. The liquid you have is also turbid, which tells me that you most likely have some suspended microorganisms as well, but this could also ...


2

This one could be tricky - the mouthfeel of a fritter is to some degree associated with the oil content from the frying. The trick with fritters is that the cooking of the outside is quick so that it doesn't massively deform or separate into small pieces when placed into the hot oil. Having said that, it may be possible to get this feel by putting a ...


2

I agree with @moscafj. However, one consideration might be anaerobic respiration rather than aerobic - resulting in some alcohol being produced. Over normal rising times I don't think this will reach any level that might either kill the yeast (around 10-12% usually) or produce intoxication of the consumer, but it might well produce a moderate amount of ...


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