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This website provides nice images that show the contrast between adding extra baking soda to dishes versus adding extra baking powder. Baking Soda - is sodium bicarbonate. It's a simple base that will react with any acid in your mixing bowl thereby producing bubbles of carbon dioxide. People point to this fact as the reason that it can be used as a ...


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The buttermilk is acidic enough that it interferes with the environment that commercial yeast needs to reproduce well I don't think this is the case. Yeast prefers a mildly to moderately acidic environment: pH 4.5 - 6 (7 is neutral). The various sources I've found give a pH of 4.1 - 5 for straight buttermilk, and of course that pH is buffered (brought ...


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They used malted barley (diastatic) flour--just a little goes a long way--and is usually present in "bread flour". It makes bread rise as the yeast feed upon it. Also, you can use a starter (called a polish or biga in Italian (though they are slightly different from each other), an active yeast culture maintained separately from a bread recipe but that is ...


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There is a difference between resting and proofing. Resting allows flour to absorb water and lets the gluten that was formed during kneading to relax. Both of these make it possible to work with the dough. Proofing is letting yeast produce CO2 to raise the dough. Yeast doughs do both in the rest period after they are kneaded. Unyeasted, glutinous, doughs ...


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You can't really "make" yeast. It must be cultured in the appropriate medium. Yeast can be purchased in freeze dried or fresh form and added to flour and other ingredients for baking. You can also culture yeast by creating and maintaining a starter. As of two years ago there was no commercially produced genetically modified wheat, at least in the US. I ...


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The method i use follows this concept and works for me. My favorite recipe is for a baguette dough where the first step is to mix (mix well, no kneading) only flour with 50% of its weight of water and let it sit, covered, for 45 to 60 minutes. After that, add 10% of the flour weight of water plus yeast plus salt to reach 60% of water. Mixing it is messy, ...


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Yes, yeast is perishable. Typical instructions for testing yeast (active dry or cake, but NOT for instant yeast) include adding the packet (typically @ 2 tsp/ 7 g) yeast and 1 tbsp. granulated sugar to 1/2 cup / 113 ml (warm to very warm water (100-120ºF / 40-48ºc) and and letting it sit for about 10 minutes. It won't necessarily bubble up dramatically but ...


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Based on your comments, it sounds like you're adding the dry yeast powder to water. The yeast typically won't bubble or do much of anything else at this phase. Yeast are microscopic organisms that produce gas by consuming sugars and excreting carbon dioxide. This requires that they have sugar to eat, which plain water of course doesn't. The main purpose of ...


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If you add yeast after you develop the gluten you will have to knead a lot to make sure it is distributed throughout, and you will end up overkneading your dough leading to a tough result. Kneading is only one thing that develops gluten, yeast assists in gluten development by opening up the structure when it releases CO2. Opening up the structure allows ...


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The whole idea of adding the yeast before kneading is to be able to mix it uniformly. By adding the yeast after the dough is formed, it will be mechanically more difficult to combine it and you might end up with lumps of yeastless dough. Those lumps won't rise. I suspect your bread will have a denser, non uniform crumb.


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