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6

Yes, rising is very dependent on gluten. In almost all cases, you won't get any rising without a gluten-rich flour. Even if you use wheat flour, but one that has the wrong proportion of gluten, you will get a disappointing rise. If you were to try making a bread recipe calling for AP flour (8-10% gluten) with bagel flour (14-15% gluten) or a recipe for bread ...


0

Google returned this link with the following conversion: "...1 tsp Active Dry = 2/3 tsp Instant (100% Active Dry = 66% Instant) 1 tsp Instant = 1 1/2 tsp Active Dry (100% Instant = 150% Active Dry) You can substitute one for the other in any recipe. Remember that active dry must be dissolved in a small amount of lukewarm water before you use it...."


2

Pizza dough is basically a bread. So, like other bread formulas, can be developed and expressed using a bakers percentage. For a Napolitan pizza most pizzaiolos use .1 to .5 percent yeast. This is the percentage as compared to the total amount of flour (usually tipo "OO" for this style). So, your initial research is a good starting point. You will have ...


1

No, you can't make such a generalization. There are many possible ratios, and they interact with the ratio of the other ingredients and with the process used to make the pizza. That's exactly why have recipes: each recipe is a combination of ratios and process that work well together. If you want to make a pizza, your chances for success are highest if you ...


1

First, the title of the question is about the "proportion of yeast" in pizza dough. As the question doesn't elaborate further on that point, I'm not certain what that question might be. Yeast proportions in pizza dough are typically similar to other breads, though sometimes a bit less, as pizza doesn't need to rise high. As to the specific questions: ...


23

Milk does create gluten1 when combined with flour. The water in the milk does create a gluten structure. If it didn't, any bread made with milk would be dense and flat. But the dinner rolls I made yesterday (with no water, only milk) were light and airy. Milk clearly creates gluten. Note that gluten isn't only about elasticity. Beginning bread makers ...


11

Let's start with what Gluten development actually is. It's the process of developing the protein in flour, gluten, into a web that traps air into it. Water is essential for this web, and as you mention 87% of milk is water. However, 3% of milk (whole milk, at least) is fat. This fat will coat the gluten molecules, preventing them from being shaped into a ...


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