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They are completely equivalent, with a strict conversion ratio of 1:3 (so if you have a recipe calling for 20 g of fresh yeast, you would use 6.7 g of dried, rounding up is OK). It is the same thing you are using, living organisms of the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The difference is in the nutritious medium in which they are packaged, it is fresh in ...


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One thing is if you have yeast, give it 30 minutes to settle in water before adding to the dough. Give it a chance to proliferate.


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One thing that limits the effective rise is if you knock any air out of the dough late in the process. This means you should avoid transferring it between containers after the final rise. This is especially true for high hydration doughs. That's a problem if you rely on baking in a preheated dish.


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That depends whether it still needs to be 'quick'. You can autolyse your flour, which will help the bread to rise. https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/blog/2017/09/29/using-the-autolyse-method This is just adding water to the flour - no yeast - then adding the yeast later in the process. However this will add time. You can possibly increase temperature, i.e. ...


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