Hot answers tagged

37

Dry powders are easier to mix if you make a slurry first with a small amount of liquid and then mix the slurry in. If you skip this step you will have clumps of dry powder floating on top of the milk and it will take a lot more effort to mix in. When you are using yoghurt as a starter for a new batch this step is not necessary and the starter can just be ...


36

The initial heating of the milk, besides denaturing proteins to improve the texture, also pasteurizes the milk. The culture needs to be added in a high enough concentration to crowd out harmful bacteria that might exist. That said, if your tools or containers are dirty or if your starter is dead, or you don't add enough starter, your yogurt can grow ...


33

The pectin from the blueberries jelled in the presence of the calcium in the milk. The texture might be unexpected, but it is perfectly safe and tasty. It is the same process that thickens blueberry jam. It shouldn't be curdled, that is the clumping of milk proteins in the presence of acid. Here, the milk proteins stay suspended in the milk as usual, it is ...


26

Making yogurt means letting lactic acid bacteria alter the texture and chemical composition of milk by digesting lactose and producing lactic acid, which in turn interacts with the proteins in the milk, causing the milk to thicken and taste sour. Unlike in cheese making you are not separating curds and whey, so you are not "losing" significant amounts of ...


20

I am skeptical that butter from yogurt is a thing. When yogurt is made the milk proteins denature and form a mesh that traps all the large molecules in the milk. Water, sugar, and some small molecules can come out but the fat never does- it's huge and tightly bound up in the gel. Even when yogurt is blended up the whey will separate out but the fat never ...


19

First, we are talking about different microorganisms when comparing sourdough to yogurt. Generally, a sourdough starter is populated by numerous strains of yeast and bacteria, while store bought yogurt contains a small number of isolated strains of bacteria. However, there is no reason that you can't maintain a yogurt culture that lives on. According to the ...


18

The biggest reason to heat milk to almost boiling before fermenting is that it improves the texture of the yogurt. During fermentation the bacteria consume lactose and produce lactic acid which causes the milk proteins to denature and coagulate trapping most of the fat. The proteins involved are primarily the casein proteins. When this happens, there is ...


18

Note that the milk you take out of the fridge has been sterilised (UHT or pasteurisation) - it doesn't have any bacteria (etc.)[1]. It also isn't very acidic or salty. This makes it a wonderful breeding ground for anything that can get in - there's no competition. Yoghurt (and cheese, and varieties of ham and salami, and...) is full of a bacterial cultures ...


17

There are various bacteria that can make yogurt. They ferment milk at warm temperatures and are called "thermophilic" for that reason. These bacteria were cultivated by millenia ago. I assume by having milk accidentally spoil to something that didn't kill the starving person who ate it. Tasty thermophilic lactobacilli do exist in the wild but so do plenty ...


17

There are many myths surrounding yogurt making: UHT milk is bad. This is simply not true. I have made yogurt with whole fat UHT milk for years and it comes out nice and thick. In fact for the past several months I have been using a high quality whole milk powder that makes a lovely, thick yogurt. Store bought yogurt will always be thicker because of ...


17

Lactobacillus is the genus of the bacteria responsible for making yogurt. These bacteria consume sugars and excrete lactic acid. The acid denatures the proteins in the milk, causing them to coagulate into a delicious gel. Lactobacilli can consume sugars other than just lactose. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactobacillus The reason they eat lactose ...


12

In India curd means plain yogurt.


12

It all depends on taste [of course]. Lower fat milk & yoghurt are sharper, more tangy, almost 'lemony'. High fat are rich, smooth & creamy. So, start with 'How tart do you like your lassi?' & work from there. Personally, I like lassi to have some 'bite' to it, so I'd go for zero-fat yoghurt & probably what in the UK would be called semi-...


11

It's probably thickeners, such as carrageenan or xanthan gum, which are thickening/sliming up the whey. Draining off the whey or stirring it back in should be fine. A brand which doesn't have added thickeners (look for "strained" or "Greek-style" yogurt, then read the ingredients) won't do this. I've had yogurt go off many times, and slimy whey isn't how ...


10

No, the bacteria in yogurt will not serve as the primary leavening agent for dough.


9

At the restaurants where I have made butter chicken, we used a very thick yogurt to make it. A Greek yogurt (or even sour cream) would work, provided it wasn't excessively sour. If you're feeling more DIY, you could strain some regular yogurt through a coffee filter to make it a bit thicker and use that.


8

Even if it is possible, it is a very, very bad idea as you don't know what cultures or pathogens are in the already spoiled milk. Fermented dairy products should only be made from fresh milk in good condition—and in most cases, that milk should be pasteurized while fresh absolutely as soon as possible from the source cows.


8

Lactic acid is produced by 'probiotic' bacteria breaking lactose into lactic acid. Over time, more lactose is converted, producing more byproducts, thus more sourness. The byproducts of this reaction are responsible for the distinctive flavor of yogurt. See a more complete description here: Lactic Acid Fermentation


8

Fruit will settle to the bottom of the yogurt during transit anyway; this way, it ends up neat and tidy and intentional. Many people mix it together just before eating if they prefer a more blended flavor.


8

Off the top of my head, I don't know of scientific studies that have tested this. But even if there were, I don't think they'd necessarily be meaningful in comparing a particular store-bought culture to a particular "heirloom" culture. The general thing to remember about store-bought cultures is that they are bred for rapid and consistent fermentation (...


8

My first suspicion would be your oven. Home ovens are notoriously inaccurate, and it may be that yours is just slow, which is to say that it doesn't quite reach the temperature to which you set it. If you don't already have one, buy a good oven thermometer (the kind you leave in the oven all the time) and use that rather than the indicator on the oven knob ...


8

Some permanent markers (sharpies for example) can take multiple passes through the dishwasher while still being legible, but a quick wipe with alcohol of any kind will take it off. For truly permanent marking on glass, engraving is the way to go. A vibrating engraver is more precise and more expensive than a rotary tool (dremel or cheap equivalent), but the ...


8

If you want less sour yogurt, you have to pick the right culture and right process. First, choose a streptococcus culture, or maybe bifida. Lactobacilicus bulgaricus gives you more sour yogurt. Second, go as low as your culture allows you. The manufacturer will have given you the range at which your culture can be incubated, choose something at the lower ...


8

To avoid clumping. It is much easier to disperse a solid into a small volume of liquid first by whisking or stirring to reach an even consistency and then pouring it into a larger volume of liquid where it will disperse readily, than it is to manage the solids being dumped directly into a larger volume of liquid.


7

Casein is the milk protein that gels to form yogurt, encapsulating whey in a "spongy" matrix. Casein floats around in milk in the form of globules, or micelles. In fresh milk, the suspended micelles bump into each other and bounce away, going off in different directions. When an acid is added to the milk, the interactions between the protein micelles are ...


7

The best butter is made from yoghurt. Besides you get a bonus which is ayran (watery yogurt). Making butter from milk is easy as told. But not tasty because the fat has milk taste. When you extract it from yogurt the butter has its pure taste. İ am from turkey and all the butter in the villages of turkey are made from yogurt. Shelf-stable products in ...


7

If you can't find a reusable sour cream starter, you can use buttermilk starter. Some bloggers and biology/chemistry professors just use fresh active buttermilk as a starter rather than ordering some online. If you look at the various labels and product pages, you will find that both the buttermilk and sour cream starters contain the same four cultures: ...


7

The leftover yogurt must contain live and active cultures. It does not matter whether the leftover yogurt is sweetened or not.


7

Having marks that are both temporary and durable is a tough combination, because something that can survive a dishwasher will by definition be hard to remove. Good answers already provided, but I personally prefer the flexibility of being able to label each container however I want every time I use it, to avoid having to keep track of separate types of ...


7

Recipes call for a certain amount of starter to maximize the chances that your starter bacteria will crowd out undesirable wild bacteria. If you use too little starter you will increase the chances that some random bacteria will win the incubation war. Since you don't know what you will get this can be actually dangerous. I would recommend making an ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible