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37

Dry powders are easier to mix if you make a slurry first with a small amount of liquid and then mix the slurry in. If you skip this step you will have clumps of dry powder floating on top of the milk and it will take a lot more effort to mix in. When you are using yoghurt as a starter for a new batch this step is not necessary and the starter can just be ...


34

The initial heating of the milk, besides denaturing proteins to improve the texture, also pasteurizes the milk. The culture needs to be added in a high enough concentration to crowd out harmful bacteria that might exist. That said, if your tools or containers are dirty or if your starter is dead, or you don't add enough starter, your yogurt can grow ...


33

The pectin from the blueberries jelled in the presence of the calcium in the milk. The texture might be unexpected, but it is perfectly safe and tasty. It is the same process that thickens blueberry jam. It shouldn't be curdled, that is the clumping of milk proteins in the presence of acid. Here, the milk proteins stay suspended in the milk as usual, it is ...


16

Note that the milk you take out of the fridge has been sterilised (UHT or pasteurisation) - it doesn't have any bacteria (etc.)[1]. It also isn't very acidic or salty. This makes it a wonderful breeding ground for anything that can get in - there's no competition. Yoghurt (and cheese, and varieties of ham and salami, and...) is full of a bacterial cultures ...


12

It all depends on taste [of course]. Lower fat milk & yoghurt are sharper, more tangy, almost 'lemony'. High fat are rich, smooth & creamy. So, start with 'How tart do you like your lassi?' & work from there. Personally, I like lassi to have some 'bite' to it, so I'd go for zero-fat yoghurt & probably what in the UK would be called semi-...


11

It's probably thickeners, such as carrageenan or xanthan gum, which are thickening/sliming up the whey. Draining off the whey or stirring it back in should be fine. A brand which doesn't have added thickeners (look for "strained" or "Greek-style" yogurt, then read the ingredients) won't do this. I've had yogurt go off many times, and slimy whey isn't how ...


8

To avoid clumping. It is much easier to disperse a solid into a small volume of liquid first by whisking or stirring to reach an even consistency and then pouring it into a larger volume of liquid where it will disperse readily, than it is to manage the solids being dumped directly into a larger volume of liquid.


7

Recipes call for a certain amount of starter to maximize the chances that your starter bacteria will crowd out undesirable wild bacteria. If you use too little starter you will increase the chances that some random bacteria will win the incubation war. Since you don't know what you will get this can be actually dangerous. I would recommend making an ...


4

So first off, when making yogurt hygiene is the single most important factor to successfully make yogurt without giving yourself food poisoning. Your statement about having never had a problem and about cultured yogurt never going off concerns me that your luck will make you cocky about it. inoculation with a known culture helps by prepopulating your yogurt ...


4

Some yoghurts do release a little whey. The one I was eating the other day even said so on the packet, and that it can just be stirred back in. However if the whey has since gone slimy I'd be a little more concerned. Certainly if there's any sign at all of stuff growing on it you should get rid of it. If it sits out on a breakfast table for some time, ...


4

The question may be conflating two different things. First, let's be clear about what yogurt is: the word traditionally refers to a milk product produced by fermentation with some lactic acid bacteria strains. (The exact strains of bacteria may vary depending on the culture and method, though the word "yogurt" tends to be restricted to thermophilic ...


4

Food safety for homemade yogurt works basically the same way as cooking: you are safe as long as you respect the needed time and temperature restrictions. Yogurt food safety risks The reason yogurt is safe after staying at room temperature is the same as in all fermented foods. It has a live bacterial culture of benign bacteria, and these fill all ...


3

OK, 'recipe requests' are off topic here, but as a guide to searching… There are thousands of 'British' chefs, whose ancestry is not British. If you look for a recipe on a site ending with .co.uk [or .de or .dk or .se or anywhere except .in] rather than .com then you are likely to find one who's ancestry is 'Indian' but whose upbringing is 'Western'. To ...


3

Quicker freezing = smaller ice crystals. One hour is a long time, that likely contributed to your grainy texture. If the Breville ice maker is your only option, make sure your base is as cold as possible before using the ice cream maker. That means refrigerating it for several hours in advance. You also might want to strain your base through a fine sieve ...


3

Depends what kind of cheese you want to make. Yogurt cheese is made just by straining yogurt. Your yogurt would not need to be reheated and, as long as it is still good, you can strain it just fine. Other cheese varieties either use acid or acid and rennet to tangle up milk proteins. Although some home recipes will use yogurt starters to achieve the ...


3

It sounds like you may have made paneer. Rubbing undiluted lemon juice and vinegar on the pot, then drying it without rinsing, would leave a significant amount of acid dried on the surface. That acid dissolved into the milk, curdling it. If so, it's safe to eat. Generally paneer is rinsed after curdling to remove the acidic taste.


3

First, about the holding time: It is a safety feature. It is meant to ensure that the number of non-culturing organisms that survive is so low that the culturing organisms can overtake them and create a colony of their own, without pathogens. If you reduce it, sometimes nothing will happen, and sometimes you will get a dangerously high growth of pathogenic ...


3

Yes, it is required. You have to ensure that the microbes you want dominate those that are still present in the milk, even after pasteurization/heating. This is achieved by adding a sufficient starting number and maintaining the environment (e.g., warmth) for their optimal growth.


2

Yes, you will be fine. As stated in this question, the main reason to heat milk for yogurt making is to improve texture. Heating it twice should not be a problem. It would be interesting to know if twice heated milk (heated, cooled, and reheated) has an impact vs. the traditional heating, then adding the culture at the correct temperature. There is also ...


2

On this site, we will not and can not give medical advice and that includes answers about “should I be worried” or judge whether a food is spoiled (apart from blatant cases like “it’s covered in mold” or “it smells foul”). What we can and are happy to do is answer questions about food safety based on the recommendations of government sources or other ...


2

in addition to avoiding clumping, thoroughness of mixing with less effort whether this is well understood or not, you're much more likely to uniformly mix a cup of something into a quart of something than you are to uniformly mix a teaspoon of something into a quart of something this technique scales well. need a teaspoon of something thoroughly mixed ...


2

Not sure if I should edit the question or add a new answer (comment space was to short for this). I was able to find an interesting website (https://dairyprocessinghandbook.com/chapter/fermented-milk-products) that covers all aspects of yoghurt production and I found this section.... HEAT TREATMENT The milk is heat treated before being inoculated with the ...


1

There is quite a big difference in the process of making dahi vs yoghurt (aside from pasteurisation), as yogurt is made with bacteria (called yogurt cultures) and curd is made by curdling milk with an acidic agent (like lemon juice). I would personally use full-fat greek yogurt and add a little fresh lemon juice to the yogurt for a quick-fix. You could, ...


1

You get better / more consistent results if you keep a constant temperature. 'The Art of Fermentation' says to make nice thick yogurt you must incubate it, maintaining it in a temperature range between 110° and 115°F/43° and 46°C. By leaving your yogurt outside you're exposing it to temperature variations, which can get too low (perhaps not hot enough ...


1

A bit late but would semi-sweet wine perhaps work well to simmer to dryness before adding coconut milk? Wine has the flavour and acidity needed to tenderise the meats. I am trying that right now.


1

I think putting your starter (some yogurt you want to use as) in the freezer will also prolong and ensure how many generations of batches will be able to be made in the future. My mother in the US taught me how to make yogurt as a child. Then when I lived in India with my Uncle I learned how to make (heirloom) Starter; yogurt from scratch with no previously ...


1

It can help to puree the sauce with peeled, cooked potato. Thickens the sauce and hides the separated dairy bits. Any non-fibrous cooked veg in your stew can be incorporated into the puree, further thickening and masking the problem. Sweet potatoes, carrots, and peeled tomatoes work well, for example.


1

If you find following a detailed recipe too error-prone, start simpler instead. Make your earliest efforts as simple as possible, and start small. Your first successes can come by following this simplified recipe: (1) Warm the milk to 110 degrees Fahrenheit. (2) Add yogurt. (3) Keep the mixture in a warm but not hot place for 6-8 hours. Yogurt should ...


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