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19

First, we are talking about different microorganisms when comparing sourdough to yogurt. Generally, a sourdough starter is populated by numerous strains of yeast and bacteria, while store bought yogurt contains a small number of isolated strains of bacteria. However, there is no reason that you can't maintain a yogurt culture that lives on. According to the ...


10

No, the bacteria in yogurt will not serve as the primary leavening agent for dough.


7

The point of overnight oats is to allow the oats time to hydrate slowly at a cool temperature, rather than cooking them in water. So it's best to have them well-mixed with the liquid they'll be absorbing. If you put them in (sufficiently thick) layers, it's likely that some of the oats will be less hydrated than others.


5

That happens sometimes, it means that the ecological balance in your yogurt has shifted to some less tasty bacterial strains. There is even a small chance that you picked up something slightly pathogenic. There is neither a need nor a practical way to shift it back to the original strain. It is best to start with a new, known-good culture. You can get either ...


5

Raita is a side dish or condiment meant to go along with a variety of Indian dishes. It's purpose is to complement the other offerings in the meal. It is not specifically designed to give relief from spices, though some claim this is true.


4

No, you can't do that. The inside of the carton is not cardboard, it is covered with a thin layer of a paraffin-like substance. If you hear the carton to 82 Celsius, you will melt the paraffin into the milk. There are methods where you heat and ferment in the same container, but I don't like them. With traditional heating, you end up with a layer of milk ...


4

One trick I use for yogurt starter is freezing yogurt in an ice cube tray. Every time I make a new batch, a cube goes in. When I run out of starter cubes, I freeze some more from the current batch. I've been making 3 quarts of yogurt weekly for several years and haven't noticed any changes in the resulting yogurt over the many generations of starter.


3

As for the background of the question - no, there is no "reasonable boundary", and it would be highly irregular to have one. Linguistic categories (as opposed to, say, mathematical sets) always have clear centers and partial membership, which creates fuzzy boundaries and a lot of overlap. Especially in cases such as you describe, using a ...


3

First, the tangness of yogurt depends on the culture, and somewhat on the temperature of incubation. Lactobacillus bulgaricus will give you a tangier yogurt than streptoci or bifidi-based cultures. So buy a lactobacilicus culture (either the pure culture or the yogurt made with it) and use it as your culture. Then make sure to incubate at the proper ...


3

Interesting question. I would certainly say that it's worth a try, because there is a high chance it will work. Of course, you do need to add more culture after cooling, but you already mentioned this in the question. If this fails, the most likely failure mode will be that the acid in the culturing yogurt is sufficient, and your milk old enough, that it ...


3

It will be fine. It may be a bit more sour tasting than usual, but it will not be unsafe.


3

I’m a huge dairy lover but I recently found out a couple years ago that I am lactose intolerant and had to make the switch over to non-dairy almost everything. If continuing to use butter isn’t a problem for you, keep that one. I bake a ton and butter is still the best option for popovers (my grandma was British, I make them every Christmas) and any sorts ...


2

I don't think you'll find a single substitute. A useful one that keeps indefinitely in a cupboard is coconut milk powder (or the solid blocks, but the powder is more convenient). It's also not too expensive in Indian or Far Eastern supermarkets in the UK. Hot chocolate/cocoa benefits from using coconut milk. I've been doing this for a while mainly ...


2

Natural yogurt is a perfect substitution for Indian style Dahi. That's what I use in all my recipes and I originate from the Indian subcontinent. Look out for low-fat or zero fat varieties. Lower the fat, more sour they are usually. At least this is what I have seen with natural yogurts in UK. You can mix in some lemon juice to add sourness since pasteurised ...


2

Yogurt is sour because of the process of fermentation, whereby lactose bacteria make energy by breaking down lactose to glucose and galactose. Glucose then enter glycolysis to produce energy in a form of ATP and NADH, and lactic acid is produced as a by-product (waste product). The production of lactic acid makes the pH of the milk to drop, from ...


2

This is a very normal thing to do. The result is not called yogurt, but sour cream. You can use yogurt, especially lactobacillus yogurt, as a starter for full-fat sour cream of the Eastern European type. The fermentation process is the same as for yogurt. It gets a very nice characteristic smell which is different from that of yogurt. It might stay slightly ...


2

It's not particularly risky. In general, any bacteria or fungi that will hurt you will also cause the yogurt to turn visibly and smellably bad.


2

A great way to add fruit to yogurt is to use a jam, jelly, or fruit preserve of choice. By cooking out the liquid and thickening with sugar and pectin, a jelly ends up much less watery than a fruit puree. Depending on the fruit you are starting with and the desired texture, the exact recipe will vary. Store-bought jams work as well. If you are looking for a ...


2

I've used powder as well, with good success. Syrup would definitely work. If you are grating chocolate, I suggest using a very fine grater such as a microplane. Dried cranberries get most of their sweetness from added sugar. Your better off flavor-wise to just add the sugar. For a more natural and healthful sweetener that is compatible with chocolate, I'd ...


2

I almost do the same thing. I simply mix a scoop of cocoa powder into my (usually vanilla flavored when I decide to add cocoa) yogurt, and that's it. But then again, I use sweetened yogurt, so maybe add some natural sweetener, like honey or maple syrup into your yogurt as well.


1

Actually, the yogurt cultures, usually some strain of the group N Streptococcus and Leuconostoc species, mesophilic cultures, converts the lactose into lactic acid, which gives the diary product it's tart taste. Furthermore, bacterial enzymes transform the milk carbohydrates into oligosaccharides, some of which have prebiotic properties. Different LAB (...


1

It sounds like a type of cheese to me. You say "fresh buffalo milk is cooked with an acid to reduce the water". That's how acid-set cheese is made, or at least the first step. Indian Paneer, for example, is usually made by bringing milk to the boil, turning off the heat, and adding lemon juice. Then the curds are drained out of the whey and ...


1

An update: the things I were the most confident with (my probiotic and my yogurt maker) were the ones malfunctioning. I was successful making yogurt with lactose free milk and homemade coconut milk using store bought lactose free yogurt as starter and a yogurt nest (basically a thermal bag made of fabric and cork). As for the almond milk I believe removing ...


1

You can add cream to milk when making yogurt. This will increase the fat content. However, if by "creamy", you are referring to texture of your yogurt, there are other variables that contribute besides fat content. See this question, for example. Also, there are variables besides fat (sugar content, for example) that influence the texture of frozen ices.


1

Yes, you’re right, invert sugar slows down the crystal formation and improves the texture of frozen products. The way I use invert sugar in most frozen products is as a direct substitutue for the added sugar; for the frozen yogurt, it is no exception. You can just follow your recipe and replace the sugar with invert sugar by 80% to 100% of the weight of the ...


1

Although LB bacteria can survive on Glucose, they prefer milk because it's a complete package of Sugars, minerals, fats, and proteins. Also, just as plants and animals have an affinity for specific foods, the same goes for microorganisms.


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