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48

Double yolking tends to happen more often in spring and with young or very old birds. As commercial egg producers do not tend to let their birds get old, unless you are getting farm eggs, they are likely young birds. Automatic candles may be set up to separate these as suspect so they had to be re-run to verify they were not bad, which will result in them ...


16

Eggs are 'candled', visually inspected against a light source to check viability. It seems to be standard practice for double yolked eggs to be grouped together, though I can't find a source as to why that might be. I have heard of it several times anecdotally though.


15

A hen aged between 20-28 weeks has a one in a hundred chance of laying a double yoked egg. Since all the eggs in a box usually come from the same flock and all the birds in the flock are the same age, if you find one double yolk, the probablity of finding more in the box is high. As double-yoked eggs are larger than single yoked, if the eggs are graded to be ...


15

Double-yolked eggs are the result of an anomaly in the egg generation process in the hen. They can happen in any breed of hen, on any feed. It is a result of two ova being generated at the same time, and then encapsulated in a single shell. According to My Pet Chicken, it happens more often with younger hens. I am not aware of any process to ...


9

If your eggs are from a commercial egg company like those common in the US, there are a couple of related factors that could have contributed to your all-double-yolks carton of eggs.1 First, commercial egg farms tend to raise hens in staggered flocks, with special growing conditions applied to have all the hens in a single flock reach peak productivity and "...


9

Egg yolks are often cooked in a bowl above simmering water (also known as a double boiler), so that the egg yolks can cook/thicken without solidifying and scrambling. This is a common technique used when making custard, for example.


9

Butter and egg yolks have very different profiles in terms of their uses in recipes and constituent parts. Butter usually has 80-85% fat by weight, while egg yolks are only about 25-30% fat. Butter has only a trace amount of milk proteins, while egg yolks typically have 15% or more protein by weight. Butter has only a small amount (about 15%) of water, ...


7

Have you ever added liquid straight to tahini when making hummus? See this quote from Cook's Illustrated: 'You’d think that adding a liquid would thin tahini rather than thicken it. Why the opposite? Tahini is simply sesame-seed butter, made by grinding hulled sesame seeds into a paste. Much of its makeup is carbohydrates, and when a small amount of juice (...


7

Regarding Romanian recipe... Actually in Romania people tend not to use raw yolks so much. Most often we eat relatively raw yolks just in fried eggs or soft boiled eggs. In most of recipes the yolks are cooked. Regarding mayonnaise there are three ways of preparing it: using just raw yolks (most simple), using raw and cooked yolks 50-50, and using just ...


6

The function of the chord, that is attached to the yolk, is to hold the yolk into place. To have the most uniform baking possible, you remove the chord. However, I never do. I keep it in with the rest of the whites and I've never had any problems with the finished products. So you can: toss it keep it with the yolk (a little bit of whites with the yolk is ...


5

What you have sounds like a cross between a zabaione and a custard. Depending on what equipment you have, you might consider: heating it slowly in a double boiler while whipping it. chill it, then use it to make ice cream. It's likely too runny to use as a soufle base (fold it into whipped egg whites, then bake). You might be able to augment it with more ...


5

Where I come from, that would be called 'over hard.' As a reference, the others would be over-easy (runny yolk), over-medium (soft, slightly runny), and the over-hard would be cooked solid. Chefs will often break the yolk on an over-hard order, before flipping the egg, if it's not already broken.


5

According to my onetime teacher in Reproductive Biology at Oregon State University (Go Beavers!), Fred Menino, hens commonly lay multiple yolk eggs (I think the record is 9 yolks, but I may be mis-remembering) when young, before they are completely reproductively competent. To some degree this is a result of the selective breeding programs we (humans) have ...


5

Pumpkin pie is basically a custard, removing the yolks could change the texture of the pie. Yolks contribute both proteins and fats to the pie which are important for the structure of the filling as well as its creaminess/smoothness. In general, two whites can be used to replace one whole egg. Avoid whipping or over-mixing the filling to prevent making ...


4

There is no reason to try to remove the chalazae by hand in practice, or to worry about whether it goes with the whites (it will not interfere with foaming) or the yolks. The only application where they might be perceptible is a custard or curd. Simmered custards should be strained after cooking to catch any curdled bits; baked custards should be strained ...


4

I would use the base as a bread pudding base. If you have some stale bread, or even bread that will eventually become stale (it really depends on preference), and some raisins or any dehydrated fruit, this would make some tasty bread pudding. Re-hydrate the fruit with some of the alcohol. Heck, you might even have a favorite bread pudding recipe.


3

This is due to the proteins in the yolk denaturing and aggregating - basically the same reason the white (albumen) turns white from clear. Think about the color that would result if you mixed a dark yellow color with some of the color white (i.e. I'm not talking about mixing yolk with albumen here, just colors) - it would lighten to make a lighter yellow


3

Will it "work" in the sense that the batter on the skillet will coagulate and form a solid flat pancake-like thing? Yes, it should. That doesn't mean you'll necessarily like the results. Keep in mind that the egg/banana pancakes aren't really producing something that tastes like or has the texture of a standard "pancake" (or even most gluten-free "...


3

Yes, you can, but it will reduce the tenderness of the custard. It will be slightly stiffer and slightly less... erm... creamy or pudding like. Egg whites are essentially water and protein (albumen) and set up to a more resilient and slightly rubbery texture than do egg yolks which contain significant amounts of fat and natural lecithin, which is an ...


3

If you have evaporated milk (also known as unsweetened condensed milk) in your pantry, you can use it to replace everything except the cheese in a cheese sauce for stovetop macaroni and cheese. Stovetop Mac and Cheese with Evaporated Milk Cheese Sauce This recipe is an example of mac and cheese made with an evaporated milk cheese sauce. Ingredients ...


3

You can get the starchy thickening effect by adding some pasta water to your sauce. Here's an example recipe for the approach from Bon Appetit.


2

Sometimes you should remove the chalazae even if you're not separating the eggs. Case in point, I made lemon curd tonight to top a cheesecake. The curd contained two eggs and one yolk. The recipe said that it might be necessary to strain the curd before chilling. It was. After straining, it was clear that it was the chalazae (in minute pieces) still sitting ...


2

I think you're looking for shrimp with egg yolk sauce. Egg yolk sauce is simply a kind of thick mayonnaise which gets dropped on fried (or deep fried, or grilled) shrimp. The yolk sauce usually has some yellow food coloring in it to make it look more eggy. Using canola (rapeseed) oil helps with getting a nice color too. It should be dead simple to do at ...


2

The yolk also has a fair bit of protein but it is combined with a huge amount of fat as well. Whites, on the other hand, have only protein. When egg whites cook in a custard they have to be mixed very well, cooked gently, and usually still strained, in order to avoid blobs of scrambled egg messing up the texture of the dish. Egg yolks are much easier. Some ...


2

I'd possibly try this, as an experiment. Mild cheddar melts better than mature or vintage, so I'd be tempted to try extract the best from both. Start with butter & milk, a dash of mustard powder, salt/pepper & add very mild grated cheddar. Heat & stir until it will combine smoothly. Mix in your part-cooked pasta. Add a good handful or two of ...


1

If I was absolutely desperate and didn't have flour, corn starch or anything similar, I'd try using breadcrumbs (ideally fine). The texture would be different, and I think I'd melt cheese into milk (no butter, and perhaps a little less milk than normal) then stir in the pasta, cooked to barely al dente, before adding breadcrumbs until it just starts to ...


1

I use Instant Masa, nixtamalized, powdered corn, on place of flour for most gravies and sauces. It does not add much flavor on its own, and has a thickening strength quite similar to white flour. Making a cheesy Hollandaise, with yolks, butter, lemon juice and cheese might work. There's plenty of recipes online but, being satisfied with Masa, I've not ...


1

In an article I with a very quick google search found here, it seems that you can blend 1 tablespoon of flax or chia seeds with 3 tablespoons of water until mixture is thick and creamy. However, I suspect that this would add a gritty texture that would be unpleasant in easter sweet breads. You would probably find that a full-fat yogurt is a good ...


1

I will not particularly get into most of the points of your question, as things like nutrition is off topic an highly polarizing and things like taste or in my view almost entirely opinion based and personal preference or culturally based. OK, in violation of that I will make statements about nutrition which is based on years of research while raising eggs, ...


1

As Erica says in the comments, it would make a great eggnog. Add some hard alcohol (there are lots of recipes out there - bourbon, rum, brandy, or some combo). Whip the egg whites and then beat them lightly into the nog. Sprinkle with nutmeg, serve. The amounts you have will make a nog that has a higher cream:egg ratio than most, but it should still taste ...


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