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  1. I should soak soy beans for 24 hours. The water level should cover the beans in excess of at least half the volume of the beans. i.e., if we use two quarts of beans, the excess water level above the beans should be at least a quart. Cover the pot to keep the heat in.
    But: I would soak it for 24 hours in water kept lukewarm with lowest possible heat on a stove. The idea is to keep it warm to encourage water absorption but not too warm to encourage soybeans nutrients from leaching out to the water.

    OK, confession, I can't remember if soak for 24 hours or 8 hours.

  2. You would see the beans having absorbed much of the water. Add water to ensure water level half an inch above the beans. Raise the heat to bring the water to boil. Turn the heat down to keep the water simmering. Cover the pot. Simmer the pot of beans for four hours. Check the level of the beans regularly to ensure sufficient water level above the beans.

    I am thinking the next time, I would use a slow cooker for this step.

  3. After the 24 or 84 hour soakingsimmering, drain the water. Grind the beans into a mush with a blender. Be compulsive in ensuring the mush particles are as fine as possible. I would grind no more than a third of the volume of the blender container each time.

  4. Boil the soy pulp/mush with sufficient water. If you wish to have thick soy milk, especially if you wish coagulate into soy custard, ensure water level is no more than a quarter inch above the beans. Because we are now boiling pulp, the heat transfer of the pulp is impeded by its thick viscosity. We need to ensure the pulp at the bottom is not burnt and ensure heat is transferred to the top of the pulp by stirring. You would need to constantly add water to the pulp to balance between how thick you wish the soy milk to be vs how easy you prefer your stirring job would be.

  5. When the pulp comes to a boil, simmer it for another half hour, by repeating the balancing act of stirring and adding sufficient water. I guess after a few times, I should be experienced enough to know how much water the pulp would absorb so that I would add all the water the pulp needed at the beginning to make my stirring job easier at first. The last time I made soy milk/custard was four years ago - so, I don't remember.

  1. I should soak soy beans for 24 hours. The water level should cover the beans in excess of at least half the volume of the beans. i.e., if we use two quarts of beans, the excess water level above the beans should be at least a quart. Cover the pot to keep the heat in.
    But: I would soak it for 24 hours in water kept lukewarm with lowest possible heat on a stove. The idea is to keep it warm to encourage water absorption but not too warm to encourage soybeans nutrients from leaching out to the water.

    OK, confession, I can't remember if soak for 24 hours or 8 hours.

  2. You would see the beans having absorbed much of the water. Add water to ensure water level half an inch above the beans. Raise the heat to bring the water to boil. Turn the heat down to keep the water simmering. Cover the pot. Simmer the pot of beans for four hours. Check the level of the beans regularly to ensure sufficient water level above the beans.

  3. After the 24 or 8 hour soaking, drain the water. Grind the beans into a mush with a blender. Be compulsive in ensuring the mush particles are as fine as possible. I would grind no more than a third of the volume of the blender container each time.

  4. Boil the soy pulp/mush with sufficient water. If you wish to have thick soy milk, especially if you wish coagulate into soy custard, ensure water level is no more than a quarter inch above the beans. Because we are now boiling pulp, the heat transfer of the pulp is impeded by its thick viscosity. We need to ensure the pulp at the bottom is not burnt and ensure heat is transferred to the top of the pulp by stirring. You would need to constantly add water to the pulp to balance between how thick you wish the soy milk to be vs how easy you prefer your stirring job would be.

  5. When the pulp comes to a boil, simmer it for another half hour, by repeating the balancing act of stirring and adding sufficient water. I guess after a few times, I should be experienced enough to know how much water the pulp would absorb so that I would add all the water the pulp needed at the beginning to make my stirring job easier at first. The last time I made soy milk/custard was four years ago - so, I don't remember.

  1. I should soak soy beans for 24 hours. The water level should cover the beans in excess of at least half the volume of the beans. i.e., if we use two quarts of beans, the excess water level above the beans should be at least a quart. Cover the pot to keep the heat in.
    But: I would soak it for 24 hours in water kept lukewarm with lowest possible heat on a stove. The idea is to keep it warm to encourage water absorption but not too warm to encourage soybeans nutrients from leaching out to the water.

    OK, confession, I can't remember if soak for 24 hours or 8 hours.

  2. You would see the beans having absorbed much of the water. Add water to ensure water level half an inch above the beans. Raise the heat to bring the water to boil. Turn the heat down to keep the water simmering. Cover the pot. Simmer the pot of beans for four hours. Check the level of the beans regularly to ensure sufficient water level above the beans.

    I am thinking the next time, I would use a slow cooker for this step.

  3. After the 4 hour simmering, drain the water. Grind the beans into a mush with a blender. Be compulsive in ensuring the mush particles are as fine as possible. I would grind no more than a third of the volume of the blender container each time.

  4. Boil the soy pulp/mush with sufficient water. If you wish to have thick soy milk, especially if you wish coagulate into soy custard, ensure water level is no more than a quarter inch above the beans. Because we are now boiling pulp, the heat transfer of the pulp is impeded by its thick viscosity. We need to ensure the pulp at the bottom is not burnt and ensure heat is transferred to the top of the pulp by stirring. You would need to constantly add water to the pulp to balance between how thick you wish the soy milk to be vs how easy you prefer your stirring job would be.

  5. When the pulp comes to a boil, simmer it for another half hour, by repeating the balancing act of stirring and adding sufficient water. I guess after a few times, I should be experienced enough to know how much water the pulp would absorb so that I would add all the water the pulp needed at the beginning to make my stirring job easier at first. The last time I made soy milk/custard was four years ago - so, I don't remember.

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  1. Do not throw the residual pulp away. It is for making soy chicken.

  2. Make a paste from tapioca flour. Blend the tapioca paste into the pulp. The amount of tapioca paste must be sufficient to make it a binding agent for the pulp.

  3. I have poor experience in this area. The last time I made this soy custard+milk+chicken, I actually used the residue to make real chicken meat balls by blending real chicken meat and cilantro into the tapioca and soy pulp mix (what my mom would do). I guess there wasn't enough tapioca and the chicken balls were falling apart.

  4. What I need to perfect is having tiny bits of fresh vegetable and meat content in the soy chicken balls without the balls falling apart.

  5. Roll the blended mixture into small spheres, cigars or patties with your fingers and palms constantly covered with tapioca flour and brine (to prevent the patties from sticking to your skin).

  6. Dump the soy balls, cigars, patties into an already hot boiling pot of water. Fish them out after a minute or two.

  1. Do not throw the residual pulp away. It is for making soy chicken.

  2. Make a paste from tapioca flour. Blend the tapioca paste into the pulp. The amount of tapioca paste must be sufficient to make it a binding agent for the pulp.

  3. I have poor experience in this area. The last time I made this soy custard+milk+chicken, I actually used the residue to make real chicken meat balls by blending real chicken meat and cilantro into the tapioca and soy pulp mix (what my mom would do). I guess there wasn't enough tapioca and the chicken balls were falling apart.

  4. What I need to perfect is having tiny bits of fresh vegetable and meat content in the soy chicken balls without the balls falling apart.

  5. Roll the blended mixture into small spheres, cigars or patties with your fingers and palms constantly covered with tapioca flour and brine (to prevent the patties from sticking to your skin).

  6. Dump the soy balls, cigars, patties into an already hot boiling pot of water.

  1. Do not throw the residual pulp away. It is for making soy chicken.

  2. Make a paste from tapioca flour. Blend the tapioca paste into the pulp. The amount of tapioca paste must be sufficient to make it a binding agent for the pulp.

  3. I have poor experience in this area. The last time I made this soy custard+milk+chicken, I actually used the residue to make real chicken meat balls by blending real chicken meat and cilantro into the tapioca and soy pulp mix (what my mom would do). I guess there wasn't enough tapioca and the chicken balls were falling apart.

  4. What I need to perfect is having tiny bits of fresh vegetable and meat content in the soy chicken balls without the balls falling apart.

  5. Roll the blended mixture into small spheres, cigars or patties with your fingers and palms constantly covered with tapioca flour and brine (to prevent the patties from sticking to your skin).

  6. Dump the soy balls, cigars, patties into an already hot boiling pot of water. Fish them out after a minute or two.

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  1. I should soak soy beans for 24 hours. The water level should cover the beans in excess of at least half the volume of the beans. i.e., if we use two quarts of beans, the excess water level above the beans should be at least a quart. Cover the pot to keep the heat in.
    But: I would soak it for 24 hours in water kept lukewarm with lowest possible heat on a stove. The idea is to keep it warm to encourage water absorption but not too warm to encourage soybeans nutrients from leaching out to the water.

    OK, confession, I can't remember if soak for 24 hours or 8 hours.

  2. You would see the beans having absorbed much of the water. Add water to ensure water level half an inch above the beans. Raise the heat to bring the water to boil. Turn the heat down to keep the water simmering. Cover the pot. Simmer the pot of beans for four hours. Check the level of the beans regularly to ensure sufficient water level above the beans.

  3. After the 24 or 8 hour soaking, drain the water. Grind the beans into a mush with a blender. Be compulsive in ensuring the mush particles are as fine as possible. I would grind no more than a third of the volume of the blender container each time.

  4. Boil the soy pulp/mush with sufficient water. If you wish to have thick soy milk, especially if you wish coagulate into soy custard, ensure water level is no more than a quarter inch above the beans. Because we are now boiling pulp, the heat transfer of the pulp is impeded by its thick viscosity. We need to ensure the pulp at the bottom is not burnt and ensure heat is transferred to the top of the pulp by stirring. You would need to constantly add water to the pulp to balance between how thick you wish the soy milk to be vs how easy you prefer your stirring job would be.

  5. When the pulp comes to a boil, simmer it for another half hour, by repeating the balancing act of stirring and adding sufficient water. I guess after a few times, I should be experienced enough to know how much water the pulp would absorb so that I would add all the water the pulp needed at the beginning to make my stirring job easier at first. The last time I made soy milk/custard was four years ago - so, I don't remember.

  1. I should soak soy beans for 24 hours. The water level should cover the beans in excess of at least half the volume of the beans. i.e., if we use two quarts of beans, the excess water level above the beans should be at least a quart. Cover the pot to keep the heat in.
    But: I would soak it for 24 hours in water kept lukewarm with lowest possible heat on a stove.

    OK, confession, I can't remember if soak for 24 hours or 8 hours.

  2. You would see the beans having absorbed much of the water. Add water to ensure water level half an inch above the beans. Raise the heat to bring the water to boil. Turn the heat down to keep the water simmering. Cover the pot. Simmer the pot of beans for four hours. Check the level of the beans regularly to ensure sufficient water level above the beans.

  3. After the 24 or 8 hour soaking, drain the water. Grind the beans into a mush with a blender. Be compulsive in ensuring the mush particles are as fine as possible. I would grind no more than a third of the volume of the blender container each time.

  4. Boil the soy pulp/mush with sufficient water. If you wish to have thick soy milk, especially if you wish coagulate into soy custard, ensure water level is no more than a quarter inch above the beans. Because we are now boiling pulp, the heat transfer of the pulp is impeded by its thick viscosity. We need to ensure the pulp at the bottom is not burnt and ensure heat is transferred to the top of the pulp by stirring. You would need to constantly add water to the pulp to balance between how thick you wish the soy milk to be vs how easy you prefer your stirring job would be.

  5. When the pulp comes to a boil, simmer it for another half hour, by repeating the balancing act of stirring and adding sufficient water. I guess after a few times, I should be experienced enough to know how much water the pulp would absorb so that I would add all the water the pulp needed at the beginning to make my stirring job easier at first. The last time I made soy milk/custard was four years ago - so, I don't remember.

  1. I should soak soy beans for 24 hours. The water level should cover the beans in excess of at least half the volume of the beans. i.e., if we use two quarts of beans, the excess water level above the beans should be at least a quart. Cover the pot to keep the heat in.
    But: I would soak it for 24 hours in water kept lukewarm with lowest possible heat on a stove. The idea is to keep it warm to encourage water absorption but not too warm to encourage soybeans nutrients from leaching out to the water.

    OK, confession, I can't remember if soak for 24 hours or 8 hours.

  2. You would see the beans having absorbed much of the water. Add water to ensure water level half an inch above the beans. Raise the heat to bring the water to boil. Turn the heat down to keep the water simmering. Cover the pot. Simmer the pot of beans for four hours. Check the level of the beans regularly to ensure sufficient water level above the beans.

  3. After the 24 or 8 hour soaking, drain the water. Grind the beans into a mush with a blender. Be compulsive in ensuring the mush particles are as fine as possible. I would grind no more than a third of the volume of the blender container each time.

  4. Boil the soy pulp/mush with sufficient water. If you wish to have thick soy milk, especially if you wish coagulate into soy custard, ensure water level is no more than a quarter inch above the beans. Because we are now boiling pulp, the heat transfer of the pulp is impeded by its thick viscosity. We need to ensure the pulp at the bottom is not burnt and ensure heat is transferred to the top of the pulp by stirring. You would need to constantly add water to the pulp to balance between how thick you wish the soy milk to be vs how easy you prefer your stirring job would be.

  5. When the pulp comes to a boil, simmer it for another half hour, by repeating the balancing act of stirring and adding sufficient water. I guess after a few times, I should be experienced enough to know how much water the pulp would absorb so that I would add all the water the pulp needed at the beginning to make my stirring job easier at first. The last time I made soy milk/custard was four years ago - so, I don't remember.

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