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I'm making bread and the recipe is calling for 10g od dried milk powder and 260g of milk. I don't have any dried milk powder and there's no place to get it near me. In other posts, I saw that you recommended switching dried milk powder and water to only milk. In my recipe it's different, there's no water in, only dried milk powder and milk. What can I switch the dried milk powder with? I got an automatic answer which lead me to a post which they told to substitute dry milk by reducing the amount of water and adding more milk. In my case, I don’t have water in the recipe so what can I do? thank you :)

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    Possible duplicate of Dry milk in bread: purpose, and substitutions – moscafj Jul 21 at 14:10
  • The milk will contain enough liquid to substitute for the water. The extra milk powder is possibly to get some more protein or possibly fats into the mixture. Try substituting a little cream or butter? – bob1 Jul 21 at 14:22
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    @Asaf Zini, it wasn't an automated message. I marked it as duplicate. I think the information you need is in that question. It identifies the purpose that dried milk serves. I would say that since you are using milk already, you could just leave the dried milk out . 10 grams really isn't that much. – moscafj Jul 21 at 14:48
  • @moscafj Oh my mistake, sorry. so I just won't add the dried milk. maybe ill add a bit more butter or cream. thank you! – Asaf Zini Jul 21 at 14:52
  • It seems you are trying this recipe for the first time to try it out to see if you like it. The milk powder is probably there to tenderize the crust. For the first time, you can just leave the milk powder out altogether and see if you like it. You may find it's fine the way it is and have no need for the milk powder. If you like the bread but find it too crusty, then you can search for a substitute. – Rob Jul 23 at 9:43
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A recipe that calls for adding dry milk powder to whole milk is probably trying to add protein. Try some finely ground nuts, or maybe chickpeas.

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Maybe you could substitute all the dry milk powder with milk. 1g dry milk powder could use about 7.5g water to make into liquid milk. So for your recipe you could use extra 75~100g liquid milk to replace original 10g milk powder. If too moist in result you may add less all-purposed flour for dough adjustment.

Just thought maybe you could also replace milk powder with soybean powder or almond powder, but I don't know how good or bad for this recipe, just give a try :P (For nutrition fact the replacement is good.)

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I recommend canned evaporated milk, which has only a slightly higher ratio of milk solids than you are going for, or you can make your own at a better ratio by simmering 2 cups of regular milk down until it becomes about 1.5 cups. Basically the powder is adding about 4% more milk solids, which is a very small amount.

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