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Recently I managed to accidentally get a bunch of raw sugar crystals stuck to the rim of a mug of tea. Drinking the tea over the sugar, being able to balance out the tartness and the sweetness as I liked was pretty amazing. Is there an easy way to repeatedly 'stick' a bunch of sugar to the rim of a mug or glass? I know that people do this with margaritas and the like, so I assume there must be an easy technique for doing it quickly, but I don't know one.

What is the quickest/best way to do it a lot of times fast?

  • When you say "a lot of times fast," do you mean on the same cup while you're drinking and it's still got liquid in it, as opposed to before filling the cup? – Erica Oct 23 '14 at 16:00
  • This is called "rimming a glass" or "to rim a glass", and is often done with sugar or salt, depending on the drink. – zzzzBov Oct 23 '14 at 17:28
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    @Erica - For a lot of successive cups of tea, either made separately or from a tea service. Often both 'refills' and washing out the cup and using the same cup for a new brew. – user2754 Oct 24 '14 at 12:21
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Place the sugar (or salt) in a bowl or plate large enough to hold the glass (upside down)

Rub the rim of the glass with lemon (or lime, or use simple syrup) the rim should be wet and sticky.

Roll/Dip the rim of the glass in the bowl full of sugar.

In my experience, you need to leave the glass to dry for a few minutes to let the sugar or salt settle and dry properly; or long enough to prepare your drinks (or tea).

There are numerous video on the internets showing this.

  • Thanks, I didn't know that term which would explain why I couldn't find a simple explanation like that. – user2754 Oct 24 '14 at 12:19
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    In place of rubbing the rim with the liquid, if you're doing this a lot, such as making trayfuls of cocktails or shots, you can simply dip the glass into a shallow saucer or plate of the liquid similar to what you do for the salt/sugar. One last tip; salting/sugaring only half the rim makes it easier for your guests/drinkers to get to the drink itself if they prefer not to have the extra salt or sugar taste, and it can add an aesthetic twist. – KeithS Dec 15 '15 at 23:30

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