I usually marinate my chicken breasts/wings in a wet marinade overnight and apply a dry rub shortly before I throw them on the smoker. The main problem I'm facing is that I'm not able to get nice and consistent bark. I was wondering if applying a mustard binder as I would with something like ribs or brisket would help remedy this issue?

This is a good tutorial: http://www.wikihow.com/Apply-Dry-Rub-to-Chicken

2 things from the above link:

  1. Properly dry the meat before applying the rub.
  2. Let the meat rest a little while with the rub so that the rub re-hydrate a little bit and that will help it stick more to the meat.

So you will need to adjust your timing between getting the meat out of the wet marinade and putting it in the smoker.

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    I know that Cook's Illustrated recommends allowing a chicken to sit in the fridge, uncovered, after brining (if time/space allows) to allow the skin to dry off/out a bit. Their suggestion is more for crisper skin, but I'd imagine it might help with this, too. – PoloHoleSet Aug 8 '17 at 21:00

From Wikipedia:

"A pellicle is a skin or coating of proteins on the surface of meat, fish or poultry, which allow smoke to better adhere to the surface of the meat during the smoking process. Useful in all smoking applications and with any kind of animal protein, it is best used with fish where the flesh of, say, salmon, forms a pellicle, the surface that will attract more smoke to adhere to it than would be the case if it had not been used. Without a pellicle the fish would be inedibly dry from enough smoking to produce a tasty finished product. It is the pellicle which permits the transformation creating delectable smoked salmon."

Basically, after applying your dry rub, allow to dry in the fridge.

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    Hello and welcome to Seasoned Advice. Your answer is copied. Please edit your post to include the source. – Cindy Nov 7 '17 at 9:40

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