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I understand from a little bit of reading that too low of a temperature with beef spareribs will make for very tender muscle but fat that is not rendered (http://www.insearchofheston.com/2014/03/how-to-make-heston-blumenthals-72-hour-rib-of-beef-recipe/).

On the other hand, too high will leave the flesh falling apart and stringy (personal experience, braising for 3-4 hours).

I would think barbecue people and smoker people would have this cut of meat fairly well figured out, but in a quick search of barbecue sites I do not find anything. (well what I find is generally 95˚C to 100˚+C which I think is unreasonably high)

I have an accurate oven thermostat so I often sous-vide cook dry in the oven. Can someone suggest a temperature to try, which has worked well in your experience?

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    What does sous vide in a dry oven look like? – moscafj Jan 19 '18 at 0:20
  • Just roasting at a very low, well regulated temperature to approach the same result as sous vide technique. I guess "sous vide" is an incorrect term for this technically, but I am looking for a temperature that would work for sous vide. I will add a photo so you can see the result. – Douglas Held Jan 19 '18 at 10:31
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I wasn't intending to answer my own question, but there were no replies and so I went ahead with 24 hours at oven set to 80˚C (internal temperature is 74˚C which is lower than what I was expecting.

There is a little bit of water in the pan and the ribs are snugly wrapped in foil. They were rubbed in sugar, salt, smoked paprika, allspice and oregano/rosemary.

beef rib detail

  • I should add that this is almost exactly what I was aiming for: close to a "smoker" result with pink and juicy soft muscle and rendered fat. It could be a little softer and moister so in my judgment, the temperature should have been restricted lower. I have put a digital thermometer probe into my oven and I've found the air temperature is not as well controlled as I had thought it was. At the 80˚C setting, the air temperature is actually fluctuating between 90˚C and 91˚C. – Douglas Held Jan 19 '18 at 10:51

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