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Every now and then when I use my propane grill my food comes out tasting like propane. I am wondering why this is and how to correct it.

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    Bad regulator, perhaps? – Mr. Mascaro Apr 3 '15 at 16:56
  • Propane is odorless, so it doesn't actually taste like anything. What you can smell is ethanethiol, an additive added to propane in order to give it an odor. It's highly volatile and will burn up with the propane when cooking and so won't transfer to your food. – Ross Ridge Apr 3 '15 at 16:56
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    ...which suggests incomplete combustion (since it IS getting on the food), which suggests either the fuel air mixture being set wrong, or being upset by having dirt/spiders/mud-wasps/etc. blocking the air intakes. Of course, the real solution is use charcoal ;-) – Ecnerwal Apr 3 '15 at 19:45
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@Ross Ridge's comment implies that it can't happen, but it is happening.

That suggests incomplete combustion (since it IS getting on the food), which suggests either the fuel air mixture being set wrong, or being upset by having dirt/spiders/mud-wasps/etc. blocking the air intakes. The flames should be pure blue, no yellow (some instructions say "pale yellow tips") when the air mixing is set correctly. Any thing that blocks or restricts the air intake will tend to leave the flame fuel-rich, with yellow or orange colors, and all the gas may not be burned.

To solve, clean the burners completely, find the adjustment points for air (generally just after the gas orifice) and adjust for a clear blue flame. Your grill instructions should describe your particular version.

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I'll still stick by the ultimate solution being charcoal, having tried it both ways. If you get away from the compressed coal dust briquettes, real wood charcoal is actually quite fast (which was the hook the gas grill folks always used to attract people away from charcoal)

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    If your grill uses Venturi tubes make sure a spider hasn't made a home and then died in there – Escoce Apr 3 '15 at 20:12
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    I agree that real wood charcoal is fantastic but there is room at my house for both. Real charcoal takes more planning, costs a lot more, and wastes heat when I'm done cooking but there are still coals left. I use charcoal when I have time and want something special. I use propane when I want a broiler without air conditioning the house back down. – Sobachatina Apr 3 '15 at 20:38
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    You can save a lot of that excess charcoal by breaking the fire up/spreading it out when done grilling. Separated enough, the coals go out; Or you can water it down and let it dry out if it will be a while before your next grill session. – Ecnerwal Apr 4 '15 at 1:21

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