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Can anyone explain what's going wrong with my beignets? The first time I made them they were perfect. Since then they've come out completely hollow. Like just a shell with nothing at all inside. As far as I know I'm doing everything the same, and I'm using the same recipe as it's written. I switched brands of yeast after the first hollow batch happened, then the next two batches did the same. What causes this? This is the recipe I'm using(which worked great the first time) https://addapinch.com/beignets-recipe/

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    Hmmm. Maybe try rolling it out a bit thicker? 1/4 inch seems pretty thin for beignets; try making it about twice as thick?
    – FuzzyChef
    Aug 12 '18 at 5:02
  • It's a yeast dough, right? could there have been a difference in temperature, which would affect the dough's proofing? I mean, I've seen something similar in bread, when it's more holes than loaf... Or even a temperature difference in the frying oil, might make a difference in the, um, equivalent of oven-spring aka how much it puffs up when exposed to the heat... more puff mean more air, less beignet inside.
    – Megha
    Aug 12 '18 at 6:46
  • @FuzzyChef Yes, I've tried thicker. Same thing happened. Thing is, they came out perfect the first time and I've followed the recipe the same every time(well, obviously I haven't)
    – magilla71
    Aug 12 '18 at 16:51
  • @Megha There does seem to be an awful lot of air. It rises quite large and when I pull a piece of dough off , the rest collapses. I don't think it did that the first time I made them. I've been putting the covered dough outside on a dark part of my porch to rise. It's been about 90 degrees. Maybe I should keep it inside. But it just worked so well the first time. They were some of the best beignets I've ever had, and I live in New Orleans.
    – magilla71
    Aug 12 '18 at 17:08
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    Rising at 90F? Seems like Megha may be on to something ...
    – FuzzyChef
    Aug 13 '18 at 6:20
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I had the same problem too, and thought that I was going crazy because I’ve tried so many different recipes and always end up with hollow beignets!

What I eventually found out was that when I fried my dough in lower heat, the longer time allowed the dough to expand more, which resulted in bigger, puffy, hollow beignets.

When you cook them in medium heat, the quicker frying time allows the heat to expand just the outside and a little bit in the center- this is what makes it less hollow and more pillowy.

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