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What you made is a watered down version of a fermented or hard cider - the natural yeasts in the apple produce CO2 and alcohol, the sugar adds a bit of extra food for the yeasts, as does the honey which also contributes to the flavor, like the cinnamon stick and fennel. In short, you used the spontaneous fermentation like it’s traditional for wine and cider,...


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So that got me thinking, how can you tell if something gone past their date is fermented in a good way, or in a bad way (gone rancid)? Short of taking the food to a lab and testing it for the kinds of microorganisms in it, the answer is you can't, not really. Lots of dangerous bacteria and other microorganisms don't necessarily make food taste bad. Or ...


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Your recipe is very close to the one I use regularly. But I´m doing the cold fermentation as bulk proof. Then do the dough-balling ~5h (for 1d dough) to ~4h (for 2d dough) before baking and let them sit at room temperature. This works very well for me, but there are lots of variations possible in this process, so it´s recommendable to do some experimentation ...


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You don't need to take them out 8 hours before cooking, that's too long. 1-2 hours is long enough as it gives your dough time to come back up to temperature before baking and get active again. If your gluten is well developed before you put it in the fridge you don't need to work it further, a bit won't hurt anything but won't help either, and too much could ...


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Which foods ferment in a good way is something that's been tested over thousands of years by millions of people, long before science was invented. Cheese, good; Beer, good; Kimchi good; soggy apples… Oooh, becomes cider. A lot of the others have …ermm… casualties along the wayside ;) Back in the past, it was often a case of 'Did it taste nice?' followed by '...


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Apart from the ease of tracking rise, I see two reasons why wider containers can have disadvantages. Increased surface area. While a lid will largely prevent drying out, there still can be some drying and. oxidation caused by the air in the container. Refrigerator space. A narrower container will use up less shelf space for the same volume, which many users ...


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Surface area. If the container is too wide, larger surface of the dough gets into contact with air. Dough can dry out, yeast/sourdough culture can behave differently (during aerobic fermentation the cells multiply, during anaerobic fermentation the yeast cells produce alcohol instead of multiplying).


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