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2

Any water-tight container can be used for lactic fermentation. The main thing you want is a way to keep the vegetables submerged in the brine, usually a wide weight placed over the vegetables, so a jar which narrows a lot at the top will be trickier to work with. (Using a plastic container may give a bad flavor.) You should not seal a container being used ...


3

There certainly are chemical differences between apples and commercially purchased apple juice, but it's impossible to tell what they are, they are trade secrets. Apple juice bought in stores is not "apples squeezed then bottled", such a juice would become unappetizing before it was transported out of the factory. Juices are high tech products - "100% ...


4

The question may be conflating two different things. First, let's be clear about what yogurt is: the word traditionally refers to a milk product produced by fermentation with some lactic acid bacteria strains. (The exact strains of bacteria may vary depending on the culture and method, though the word "yogurt" tends to be restricted to thermophilic ...


2

Pasteurization to make it shelf stable is simple. Just heat the mixture stirring constantly at 180F for 10 minutes, then immediately bottle in sterilized containers. This stops the fermentation and minimizes any chance that your sauce could ever make anyone sick, assuming you fermented it long enough to get down to something like 4.0 acidity on your ph ...


7

There is no emergency, you have a healthy, active dough. You can punch it down as much as you like, remember that with pizza dough you are going to knock a load of air out when you make your pizza bases. You can keep it in the fridge until tomorrow, it should slow down as it starts to exhaust the available sugars. If you find things still going a bit too ...


2

After the first rise, you can split your dough into smaller portions and let it rise again in the fridge. Just don't forget to cover with oiled plastic wrap or a damp towel to avoid drying out.


0

If you want the traditionally round shape with an even crust around the outside, having a piece of dough that isn't spherical will make that a little more difficult (not impossible) to achieve. A dough ball will be easier to work into that shape, especially if you plan on slapping and throwing the dough into shape.


1

I honestly don't really see much of an advantage in splitting into separate dough balls for the second 24 hours of refrigeration. It sounds like OP is going to take the final dough balls out of the fridge, let them warm up some, then shape, the rise until ready to bake. My standard pizza recipe tends to be retarded in the refrigerator for 1-3 days, after ...


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