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Yes, you can use the brine you pickled them in. Covered plastic leftover containers are actually very good for storing pickles - you don't have to struggle to stuff them in jars. You can throw away the dill weed and garlic and other flavorings, just keep the pickles and enough strained brine to keep them submerged. Keep in mind, of course, that such pickles ...


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Been a while but the real solution for this for me was to use "Waterless Airlock Fermenter Lids". You put the kraut into off-the-shelf mason jars, pump out all the air and put the kraut on a shelf for a few weeks. Zero mold, every time. I've done it about 6 times now. There's an answer here that says something about "The Futility of Preventing Mold". Well, ...


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I have been told that by taking a plastic bag and turning it inside out (to get a surface which is cleaner and presumably there shouldn't be mold spores on the inside of a new bag), fill it with water and place on the top of the ferment to keep it anaerobic. The gases can escape around the edges of the bag but oxygen entering should be minimal. Hope that ...


2

In The Art of Fermentation, Sandor Katz notes that he has fermented shiitake and some other mushrooms, but does not specify fresh or dried. Christopher and Kristen Shockey, authors, owners of Mellonia Farm and the website Ferment Works, include a recipe for Pickled Shiitake in their book Fermented Vegetables that calls for dried shiitake. In the recipe ...


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There are many recipes on the internet for lacto-fermented products. There are saurkrauts fermented with caraway and kim-chi and countless others. I would avoid the oil containing products as I have never seen that in a recipe and think it would form a layer that cuts off exchange of gas, producing a potentially anaerobic environment.


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