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If you are using recycled bottles, I would say you should make sure they are relatively thick, and were originally used to bottle carbonated beverages. Also, to be on the safe side, when you decide to open the bottle after your kombucha has fermented, place it in the refrigerator overnight to reduce some pressure first; from Fermentation, over-carbonation, ...


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I would suggest, for the combination of "possible pressure" and also "easy dispensing and resealing" flip-top bottles (ceramic stopper and rubber washer on a wire bail arrangement) which were (or are intended if you are not re-using) used for a carbonated beverage (examples common in my area are Grolsch beer in green, or sparking lemonade ...


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The good thing about acetic acid bacteria is, that they require O2. If they don't get oxygen, they won't be pumping out much CO2. I therefore put them in small glass bottles with little headroom (disclaimer: I have only 5-6 months of experience). Of course there is some overpressure every time I open them, but it's not enough to blow the bottles. I've read, ...


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It is difficult to do it visually, even though there is some correlation between glass thickness and suitability for bubbly liquids. The practically useful way is to go by just knowing what the bottle was intended for. If you are going to purchase bottles, you might get some that are intended for canning. Weck has some, but the shape is probably not perfect ...


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There isn't anything wrong the the amount of bubbles you are getting; your brine looks fine. Take this from A Beginner’s Guide to Sauerkraut (+ Fermented Vegetables), for example: How quickly and how much it bubbles will depend a lot on room temperature. If your jar is narrow or filled to the top it can be helpful to place in a bowl as it might bubble over! ...


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