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3

You would want to look for a high gluten bread flour, in the 14% protein area. I found this helpful for understanding different flours. In the Fresh Loaf Discussion Forum, a user suggests combining whole wheat and bread flour in a ratio of 80/20. Here in the US, you probably have access to King Arthur flours. Their whole wheat is 14%, white whole wheat ...


1

Pour out 1 cup (or about 1/3 of the total amount if you don't have 1 cup) and feed with 2 parts unbleached all-purpose flour to 1 part water. I keep my sourdough in a quart canning jar in the fridge. Once a week, I set it out until it reaches room temperature, set aside 1 cup for bread, feed it with 1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour and 1/4 cup filtered ...


5

Then feed it again In my experience, any issues with sourdough, up to and including a surface layer of fungus, formaldehyde smell, and rotten dirty socks smell, can be fixed by simply feeding it. The worse the sourdough's condition is, the longer you have to feed it; if you don't have any of the above mentioned issues, two days consistent feeding should be ...


1

A stable sourdough will need some time to develop. During the first one or two weeks, fluctuating activity is perfectly normal, in fact, a vigorous initial activity followed by a lull is a frequent pattern. The rule of thumb is that unlike you see mold or other discoloration and the smell is somewhere between floury, yeasty or pleasantly acidic, you are ...


3

Your starter is too wet. Add less water. It's supposed to be no more than equal weights, but you are doing equal volume. Water does not weigh the same as flour.


7

That is referred to as "hooch". It is water and alcohol. It forms when the yeast has passed its peak activity. I've noticed that it corresponds with the increase of bacterial activity when the starter gets more sour. The hooch will not form when you are feeding regularly. It is harmless and can be discarded or mixed back in. Sourdough is a balancing act. ...


0

It sounds like your starter isn't attracting wild yeast, or the strains it's attracted aren't very vigorous. You're getting the right bacterial culture (hence the smell), but not the right yeast. The following suggestions are based on the Berkeley Cheeseboard book, together with my experience of doing a rye-then-wheat starter. I have not done an all-rye ...


2

To make a sourdough starter work you have to create an environment where tasty yeast and bacteria will succeed and harmful or gross microbes will be either crowded out or unable to tolerate the acidity. This environment is created by continually feeding the starter. That is, adding a consistent ratio of fresh starch to consume. I read an analogy, perhaps ...


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