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3

I would suspect for the same reason you often marinade steak or meats in onions. According to the answer onions contain proteolytic enzymes which are natural tenderizers, by breaking down proteins into smaller polypeptides or single amino acids, common in natural processes like digestion. From Wikipedia A protease (also called a peptidase or proteinase) is ...


1

When you cut into Allium like onions or garlic a chemical reaction occurs which gives you that fresh onion smell/flavor. As time goes by that reaction will continue, unless it's stopped by heat or acid. Basically if you wait, start with 15-20 minutes, after chopping your onions you can maximize the pungency. Which I think could help in masking the sweeter ...


2

From The Times of India: Add a hint of tanginess: Adding lime juice can to your dish can balance out the sweetness. In case, you don't want too much of tanginess in the dish you can also add vinegar white wine vinegar, red wine vinegar, balsamic vinegar.


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I make soups both ways and there is a clearly different end result. I'm not sure the exact mechanisms going on but I'll list some hypotheses/thoughts: I'm sure if you boil the soup for a very long time any differences will approach imperceptibility, but many soups aren't cooked for a super long time. Anyone who has experimented with this knows that the ...


0

I agree with the answers noting temperature and flavor. Fat carries flavor better than water. To add another perspective, Salt Fat Acid Heat notes why not to cook onions in acidic liquids. (That may be the case if you are making, say, a tomato heavy stew): Anything containing cellulose or pectin, including legumes, fruits, and vegetables, will cook much ...


5

It flavors your oil. Notice how in many soups there's glistening oil floating on the surface? It makes the soup taste better, but simply drizzling in the (neutral, in this case) oil at the end of cooking won't provide the same delicious results. At my household we often make tomato egg-flower soup (or as other people will put it, tomato egg-drop soup), and ...


26

It makes a big difference. The heat you can impart to anything by boiling is limited to 100°C (212°F). This is too low for some of the flavor magic to happen, like maillard reactions, which start about 140°C. A pan's temperature can get much higher than boiling water, which is why you saute them first. If you try to make onion soup without sauteing them ...


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