New answers tagged

2

Not technically an answer to the question but a solution nonetheless... Wean yourself off milk. I once couldn't drink coffee without cream (I used too much), saying "no sugar is tolerable, but if there's no milk, there's no coffee." I became frustrated over spoiled cream and wasted money. Purchasing creamer in a quart size, I couldn't use it all before ...


0

To prepare cake at last minute, i would make vanilla or chocolate flavoured pancakes or red velvet pancakes. For red color, I would use color from beet. Just grate and squeeze color from it and use how much you need. Layer the pancakes by adding some whipped cream or chocolate ganache or cream cheese frosting which goes so well with red velvet pancake. Top ...


2

I would say almond milk might be best. It doesn’t have the exact same taste as normal milk, but it is healthier as well!


0

Nestle has a product creatively called "Coffee and Milk" which is a pre-mix of sweetened condensed milk and coffee. Available in tins or in tubes, its absolutely nothing like coffee. Since there's nothing to chill, there's no need for a fridge. Downside is the drink is boiling hot. This stuff is also the taste of tramping/hiking trips for me. There are ...


-3

There is no problem. Most of supermarkets stores milk in the outside of fridge. Milk shouldn't contact sunlight. You have to store it without sunlight


3

In addition to the advice above about not explicitly trying to replace meat, the best advice I can give is to think about two things when cooking vegetarian: Umami. This is the Number One problem most people have (I'm talking to you, work cafeteria) when cooking vegetarian. Meat gives the umami/savory flavor in a dish, and you can't simply replace it with a ...


5

This is a non-vegetarian POV: Eating healthier is often just as "easy" as eating less. A good meat substitute would be to replace your meat with: Nothing. Now I don't mean replace all your meat in a dish, just part of it. Just halve the amount of meat you eat and you're already eating healthier. Halve the amount of potatoes you eat too. Keep veggies at ...


2

From a commercial/industrial standpoint, there are two sources for TVP that are industry "go-to"'s: CHS Proteins and ADM. In particular, CHS Protein's QR600 line (non-GMO version is QR600N) has the most closest match we've been able to find through sensory evaluations for matching actual meat (cooked from raw ground). If you soak them, spin dry, then mix ...


3

Me and my husband cook almost exclusively vegetarian at home, because he simply doesn't like meat very much in general. For the meat we do buy occasionally we value quality over quantity, which tends to get rather pricey and we simply can't afford much of it. However, I grew up on a lot of meat, so at first it was rather hard to come up with food ideas and ...


12

As an alternative to the (very good) vacuum bottle suggestions, Insulated lunchboxes with an ice-pack are great. My kids use them for school and the ice-pack is often still partially frozen at the end of the day, even when kept outside in hot weather. As a bonus, you can put your other snacks/lunch in there to keep cool as well.


6

Insulated Stainless steel double-walled vacuum bottles, like these. Make sure to pick one with a wide mouth so that you can use a bottle brush to clean it. Just keep it out of direct sun light. Keeps cold up to 24 hours, hot up to 12 hours. Many brands, colors, sizes, configurations. No waste, reusable, will last for years. It gets really hot here in ...


14

Here's my tricks and tips based on 25 years of being a vegetarian and cooking for a spouse who is not: Avoid meat substitutes entirely for most meals. They just don't satisfy, and simply act to remind you of the meat you're missing. Learn to cook & like cuisines that do not require meat, or only require it in small quantities, including Middle ...


11

First of all, it's not air that makes the milk spoil but microbes that fall in and grow there. So keeping it cool is one thing, the other thing is not getting the microbes in there. I have milk in my office outside the fridge up to about 20 °C over the working day without problems (I do have a fridge, though where I put it if I won't finish the package ...


11

I don't know if this is possible for you at work but it hasn't been mentioned as an option: you can use a mini fridge to keep your milk cool / cold. Here's an image of one (I left the image out on purpose, because I'm not trying to advertise a specific product.) I'm not affiliated with the manufacturer or seller, but I do have one of these fridges. I find ...


5

I've taken tetrapacks of almond milk on week-long backcountry camping trips. It doesn't taste like cow's milk, but it's far enough from the uncanny valley that it doesn't ruin the coffee, it just gives it a different flavour. Unopened they last like UHT milk and once opened they're good for at least a couple of days.


6

Use powdered milk designed to be added directly to coffee or tea. This will remove the hassle of pre-mixing your dried milk with water to form milk. I keep a can of Coffee Mate around for this purpose. These are quite often termed as whiteners rather than powdered milk. For coffee, it is like having heavy milk or cream added. To use, you spoon one ...


5

Meat substitutes - a word of warning for someone attempting to replace meat in one fell swoop... I'll leave everyone else to come up with viable meat alternatives, if that's what you actually require, but as someone who once did this & failed miserably, a word of warning. Don't expect meat substitutes to give you the same flavour or texture ...


0

When I lived in China, the milk was sold in what could easily be described as a "juice box" and it was never refrigerated. Before moving there I was under the impression that milk always needed to be chilled, and this is simply not the case. As some of the answers above have mentioned it can stay at room temp. so long as it is unopened for up to 6 months (...


17

In a similar situation in a previous job we successfully used an old camping trick: Wrap the bottle containing the day's milk in a damp cloth, and stand it in a bowl of water, in the draught from an open window. The evaporative cooling produced that way is really quite effective. Either buy a small bottle in the way in or transport it insulated. Another ...


3

I was delighted to find that gluten free flour (I've been using Doves Farm gluen free plain flour) works for roux.


41

I would invest in a small thermos bottle, about the size of what you need for one day. They are not only designed to keep hot food hot, they can also keep cold food cold. Choose a size that will be as full as possible when you start, it will keep better. If you want to go all the way, you can pre-chill the container, then fill it with well-chilled milk from ...


2

It depends on the fruit you use and whether you mind exactly how the end result turns out! freeze dried normally means berries, but they will turn to mush as they rehydrate, which is fine if you put some in a glass and drink quickly, but not good if you want them in a jug to soak up all the wine. From personal experience, I find frozen(rather than freeze ...


36

Your best bet for longevity is UHT milk - in individual portions. It's the same stuff you get in hotel rooms. Pic from Amazon, anonymised. Though it doesn't taste the same as 'real' milk it's virtually indestructible, almost inert, & will survive unopened & unrefrigerated for 6 - 9 months. As soon as it's opened, you have to treat it just like real ...


1

To replace miso, you can use soy sauce, tahini or fish sauce for that umami and savoury flavour.


5

What would change would be the taste & texture. Pulses [bean/chickpeas etc] are virtually the same canned as cooked from dried. These are the usual two methods. Fresh isn't really an option to most people, so dried or canned are the accepted sources. Tomatoes are used canned so often they have become almost a "food type" of their own. To many people, ...


1

Experimenting with the approach described by FuzzyChef, will probably be faster and more convenient than the approach suggested in this answer; this answer is mostly a record of my experiments. Caramelized White Chocolate Ganache Many if not most white chocolate varieties use deodorized cocoa butter, so most of the flavors present are from milk solids and ...


1

I find rhubarb juice home made is fabulous in oil and “ vinegar” salad dressing. I can’t eat vinegar or alcohol or citrus. Didn’t know about ascorbic acid. Rhubarb juice rocks it and there is a lovely pink color


1

No. When you make lau lau, Ti leaves are mandatory, not foil. The Ti leaves flavor is unique - smoke steam taste that accent da taro leaves.


17

Olive oil is not native to Japan and is never used in traditional Japanese cooking. (Yes, olives are now grown in Japan and olive oil is readily available, but so are burgers and pizza.) Your recipe's "vegetable oil" is almost certainly a translation of the Japanese サラダ油 sarada abura, literally "salad oil", meaning any of a number of mildly flavored, ...


6

Welcome! If your recipe is calling for vegetable oil, you would probably want something with a pretty neutral flavor. If you have a light or extra light olive oil it would likely work well. However, many people use an extra virgin olive oil for salad dressings, dipping, etc., and the flavor may not pair as well with the other ingredients. You can try it ...


9

There are olive oils that are produced in Japan and used in Japanese cuisine. It just depends on the flavors you are trying to achieve in a recipe. Sesame oil has a very strong, distinctive flavor. Olive oil can as well, but it is clearly different. It is certainly possible that flavors would be masked or changed, but if that is all you have... This ...


1

tried several attempts to use jasmine tea and vanilla this just doesn't work.First time - No. Second time - No. Third time - more fool me, you guessed it - No! Instead I used with great success some Rooibos tea with vanilla. This is already balanced to suit adding to hot water to drink and as the ratio of leaves / vanilla is done the taste just works. ...


3

I would suggest a dark, dry caramel. If you make a dark caramel and add just a tiny bit of cream or butter to it at the end, it will be firm and dry (at least, as much as ganache is) and not "sticky", as you say in your question. The trick will be adding enough butter or cream that the caramel remains pliable, but not so much that it is sticky; you may have ...


1

100% whole wheat works fine. The reason you don't see such recipes online is that so few people cook this way. Resting is more important if you are making pasta without a machine. When using a machine, put the dough through on the largest setting, fold it over and do it again and again. At one point you will get to the smooth texture that you are ...


1

Alternatively, you can add in some fats, like a canola oil or other flavor-less oil, and use some lecithin or xantham gum as an emulsifier. Just put the oat milk and oil in a blender and add the emulsifier, and that should homogenize your new milk and give it a higher fat content which will work toward the creaminess of the ice cream. (I haven't tried this ...


1

other possibilities to substitute for pineapple in that salsa: 1) fresh rhubarb 1/4" cubed, some extra rhubarb juice, and sugar 2) jicima cubed and gently steamed, tamarind paste, and lime juice 3) big blueberries, halved, and sugar 4) tart green apples cubed plus sugar and a little apple cider vinegar


2

I'd lean towards mango, with some lime juice to help match the acidity.


2

Mango, specifically green mango. You'll get a similar texture, some tartness, and it is already a widely used thing in salsas. You could easily pick how tart you want it by switching to s slightly riper Mango. https://www.google.com/search?q=green+mango+strawberry+salsa&oq=green+mango+strawberry+salsa&aqs=chrome..69i57j33.4770j0j7&sourceid=...


6

Kiwi. Don't knock it until you try it. It will have a similar acidity and texture to pineapple. Use ripe kiwi and maybe a touch extra lime juice!


1

I haven't found any thing that tastes like a bell pepper. So, I collected the seeds from one I purchased at the grocery store (well over 50 seeds) Bell pepper grow well in pots even on my tiny deck. I picked and froze/dehydrated 15 peppers from just one plant! I saved those seeds too. It only cost me a slight increase in the water bill. This year I planted ...


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