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3

There are products which are used as a substitute for cocoa. Carob comes to mind. While it obviously doesn't have the same aroma, you can still try making the substitution. Just use carob powder instead of cocoa powder. If you also have to replace cocoa butter, it becomes more difficult. No other fat performs exactly like cocoa butter, but at least this is ...


0

I have baked and cooked plenty of times with ghee, and I have made dozens of biscuits. Nothing wrong with it. Biscuits have the best flavor with ghee.


1

While chocolate is technically very low in caffeine, it has a not-insignificant amount of theobromine, a metabolite of caffeine. Unfortunately, if you are so sensitive to caffeine that Hershey's chocolate syrup (and I would suspect decaffeinated coffee) affects you, there may not be much you can do with raw chocolate. While CO2, solvent, and Swiss Water ...


11

Just to confirm what Joe said with some sources, the Estonian Dairy Association confirms that Estonian buttermilk or pett is a fermented product. That is, one takes milk and adds a culture of lactic acid bacteria (similar to how yogurt is made, though typically buttermilk is fermented with slightly different bacteria at lower temperatures, resulting in a ...


7

It sounds like what you're getting is "cultured buttermilk", which as you noted, is not the leftover liquid from having made butter, but is basically runny yogurt. I'm not familiar with Irish buttermilk, but it sounds like it's the older sense of the term "buttermilk". (ie, the milk leftover from making butter)


2

There's actually very little caffeine in chocolate. So little in fact that decaffeinating it in any kind of economical fashion is next to impossible. Scientists have done it in the lab, but doing it on a scale where you could actually buy it at a reasonable price remains out of reach for most. If you feel like chocolate leaves you 'wired' it's probably down ...


0

Despite the name, swamp eels are not true eels, and hence they are unrelated to the Japanese eel (unagi). As far as I can tell they are also unknown in Japan and not used for food there. That said, the Japanese kabayaki style of cooking most commonly associated with eels is also applied to any number of long, skinny, fishy creatures. So I'd say give it a ...


0

Many posts here are saying cakes with oil lack the buttery flavour. On the co tract alot of blogs on cup cakes and cakes will tell you oil is easier to mix, the taste is also preferable. You need to use 3/4 the amount of oil to butter when substituting. I'm not surprised oil tastes better as it has more fat content. Fat changes the taste texture and odour ...


0

I too have tried several "recipes" all different. But I have found adding Bicarbonate of Soda to pasts and ramen does firm the bite up noticeably.


3

I had the same problem by using margarine instead of butter, thought it would be ok because it said it was used for baking on the package, but mine was so soft and looked up receipes where you had to refrigerate the dough so I just put in the freezer for a few mins, got a little stiff and was able to make some crooked Christmas trees into fall leaves.. happy ...


1

The proportion is not 50/50. It's more like 30/70, cran/apple. Still, experiment with a cup (8oz) of apple juice and start adding in the cranberry juice an ounce at a time. **I honestly don't know the proper ratio, but I've tried this once and did it 50/50. It tasted horrible.


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