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1

I would expect that substitution to work fine, in a 1:1 swap. Both Brown Rice Syrup (what you're calling Maltose) and Barley Malt have a high amount of maltose-the-sugar, plus an assortment of other sugars. Both are pretty close to pure glucose in their actual sugar content, while at the same time tasting less sweet because of their composition and some of ...


1

You will lose a lot of the other flavors, but just using MSG can compensate for the strong umami and salty flavors present in fish sauce. We use this substitute often as we find the fishyness of fish sauce unpleasant.


5

If the exact NaCl content is important, eg low-salt lacto pickles, you might want to consider that commercial salt will typically have a dessicant of about 1% to stop it clumping, iodine fortification will affect the activity of microflora and mined rock salt will have a fair amount of content that is not NaCl. Rock, so to speak. But for the most part, salt ...


3

Sorry if this comes over a little curt… Is there a liquid substitution for the potato water? Water. 1:1 ratio. Check for seasoning. It won't taste like potato water, but then again instant mash doesn't taste like potato, so it won't really hurt overall.


1

Cooks Illustrated solved this problem in their pumpkin cheesecake recipe by removing the water from the pumpkin puree. They simply spread the puree on a towel or paper towel.


11

Low-sodium salts may be an exception. They replace sodium with potassium, which is heavier. But the percentage replaced is not standardized, so check the package for details.


0

another method for completeness that also uses math: try to match the target water percentage subtract water: weigh out pumpkin weight of (banana recipe grams of banana) * (.90/.72) and dehydrate to reach that weight likewise for fruit with less water if the substituting dried figs at about 24% water, weigh out figs = (banana recipe grams of banana) ...


26

Yes. In general diamond crystal kosher salt requires about twice the amount (by volume) as table salt, but measuring by weight is best and works with any salt.


0

In terms of thickening this should work, but keep in mind that you're adding salt and baking powder which will affect the flavor of the roux. You should do a side-by-side test with AP and self-rising flour and taste both, then finish your béchamel sauce and try both and post your results here.


5

I'm sure that there area a zillion recipes for both breads. I found a recipe for two 9x5 loafs. Pumpkin bread using One 15-ounce can pure pumpkin puree. Banana bread using eight very ripe bananas (unpeeled, about 32 ounces?). Most of the ingredients are similar, but the seasoning varies. I assume that the desire with the pumpkin bread recipe is to have ...


24

There's no trick, there's math. 100g of banana is about 75g of water (1g of water is 1ml, so easy to measure), 12g of sugar, and 13g of fiber and other stuff. A pumpkin is about 92g of water and 3 grams of sugar, leaving 5g of other stuff. My banana bread recipe calls for 2 medium bananas, that's about 250g of banana. That's 188g of water and about 30g ...


6

Baking is part science, part alchemy, and part luck. There are so many variable you can't control when you bake that you really need to use your senses and instruments to determine when something is done. If you are substituting in a recipe, you definitely want to account for the water difference, so this is an astute question. If you can estimate how ...


0

I notice a serious lack of liquid in this recipe. This results in the flour not fully being dissolved and the cookies being crumbly. Replacing the milk powder with milk should improve the recipe, or you could just add some water.


1

One think I would try is changing up the egg white to egg yolk recipe by multiplying the other ingredients by 1.5x and adding an extra yolk. Egg yolks are a source of emulsified fat and they keep cookies fudgier (and chewier). For other variables you can tweak, you might look at J. Kenji Lopez Alt's guide to chocolate chip cookies. He takes each ingredient 1 ...


0

Here is a trick from The Perfect Cookie Cookbook. I do this all the time now. Take away 1 tablespoon butter and add 1 tablespoon cooking oil. I have been using sunflower oil but any minimally flavored (corn, canola) or nutty oil should work. Not coconut oil - the idea is that the oil is less solid at room temperature than butter but coconut oil is ...


1

For converting coconut cream into coconut milk There seems to be a lot of disagreement, so you'll probably need to experiment (like #5 below suggests). Answer 1: BobMcGee says you "can't convert coconut cream back to coconut milk". Answer 2: In my experience, I've always added 1 can of water for every 1 can of coconut milk, and it works great for my ...


5

Depending on the animal, blood would impart a somewhat metallic taste and a certain “richness” - not really the umami-meatiness of red meat, more like the earthiness of liver - with a slight sweetness. The flavor profile will be quite different depending on the animal, with pork being more neutral than the more intense and metallic beef. A substitute ...


2

Psyllium husk is a good source of soluble fiber, but it's not a very good stabilizer or a gelling agent. If you want to replace gelatin inn recipes there's plenty of great vegan substitutes. I'd recommend using agar-agar instead; it's the closest gelling agent but it's stronger, so you need to use less than you're used to.


0

Try a specialty Asian food market, which you should be able to find in the closest metropolitan area to you. It is a similar to daikon, and that can be substituted with turnips or white radishes (for texture) and a small amount of horseradish (for spice).


2

Seeds are available in the UK if you want to grow your own, though that's only good if you want to wait a few months (my usual supplier of veg seed, Chiltern, doesn't have them). From descriptions I've read, they're closer to the milder pink summer radishes in flavour than to the winter radishes (like mooli). So you're probably best just using normal ...


7

I'm in the US and I had never heard of a green meat radish. However, based on information I found on Specialty Produce, I would think you could substitute almost any regular variety of radish you find at your local grocer. Excerpts from the linked page: Description/Taste Green Meat radishes are easily distinguished by their shape and color. The ...


0

Romanian ciulama is pretty much wheat porridge with some meat. It is also pretty much flavor-free. Source: I am Romanian.


6

Flour is much more finely ground than oatmeal. You can make 'porridge' with it, but it'll just be a smooth whitish goo. You might have slightly better results with whole wheat flour... It'll be more of a slightly grainy tan goo. Mmmmm.


0

Nuts are good for protein so as well as the peanut butter so why not add chopped pecans or walnuts etc which hopefully won’t affect the texture but will add a nice crunch and more protein. Also Organic Einkorn flour has around 20% protein as opposed to other wheats which have about 9-12%, unless of course you’re gluten free? You can find great recipes eg ...


2

In addition to rumtscho's answer: Replacing the almond milk with made up whey protein should get the proportions up. You might want to experiment with different types of protein (I've heard good things about brown rice protein though I haven't tried it on its own myself) for their effect on the texture.


4

Your goals here contradict each other. The reason that a brownie has a brownie-like texture is that it is made out of brownie batter. When you start leaving out some ingredients and pushing different ingredients into the batter, the texture of the resulting product changes. And when you add more protein, you end up with something that's drier than a brownie, ...


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