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I have taken several steaks basically straight from the fridge and started to cook them. My observations: No noticeable difference from when I let them rest. Most commonly people refer to the "blood" in steak. There is no blood, it is a type of protein that is mostly water-based, called myoglobin. Depending on the quality, cut, and the flavor you are ...


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I think any/all of the following will help: choose meat with the longest possible use-by-date use the meat ASAP after purchase clean and dry meat before cooking with damp and dry paper towels start with less flavourful meat like chicken pan-fry it on a high heat so that the dominant aroma is toasty browning/caramelized/maillard products use cured or brined ...


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It is indeed "in your head", which is absolutely normal. All tastes, good and bad, are in our heads, as well as most other things we experience. Taste is subjective, as are the associations we make with a particular aroma, and the general attitude we have towards an aroma (in your case, aversion). If you want to start eating meat again, it shouldn't be too ...


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Avoid cuts like liver that naturally have a strong flavor. Start slowly with lean cuts like chicken breats and tenderloin and use a lot of spices. Chicken and pork are good cuts for marinating a few hours before cooking. An acid marinate will naturally remove any odor or unpleasant taste.


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Cooking the meat, marinating the meat will remove the raw smell from the meat. You can try different kind of meat; beef, pork, chicken... they all smell different. If wanting to add meat back to your diet, do it slowly and try finding recipes that you can add little bit of meat at a time (mostly stews and sautées) before going full on with a t-bone steak.


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It looks like lard to me. The cut side of a ham is covered with lard to prevent drying out when curing, often mixed with spices. I wouldn't worry about it. Smoked cured ham is called speck in Italian, and mainly produced in the north, notably in Alto Adige.


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I don't have experience with the umai bag, so I don't know what it produces, but I have dried aged beef in my curing fridge. There is nothing unsafe about the trimmings (unless, as a comment points out, you contract a bad mold). Using them partly depends on how long you dry-age, and how desiccated the exterior is. It could be too dried to be pleasant, and ...


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All wrong I'm afraid! Italian Pasticcio is the same as lasagna, except pasta shapes are used instead of pasta sheets, with the ragù, besciamel sauce and Parmigiano all mixed together (hence 'pasticcio', which means 'mess' in Italian), as opposed to being layered. P.S. I was raised in Italy in an Italian family and I was taught by my Italian nanas, aunts and ...


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