Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

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As the other answers point out your brisket was vastly undercooked. Understand that this style of cooking requires not only cooking to doneness but also "time at temperature" in order to break down the connective tissue. Some poeple do inject marinades, but that's not where you are going to find the gains you are looking for here. Your biggest opportunity ...


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I'm assuming since you said "this time... still a little frozen" that you were starting from frozen Thighs the times you had success, and that the only real difference is that these particular thighs were not fully thawed. If that's not the case you could have another issue entirely. In these kinds of situations I think the best we can do is use the ...


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This contains a nice explanation of why meat is juicy and tasty, and it is due to the presence of fat and conjunctive tissue in the muscles, as well as brining and marinating. If you take a look at bird anatomy, the chest and other major muscle masses have less fat and conjunctive tissue as they evolved to be, well, muscle masses for propelling the bird ...


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Depends on the horse meat. The Japanese make horse meat sashimi, which as you might expect is quite tender.


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Some people might claim that there is no such thing as ethically sourced meat, because animal husbandry is inherently unethical. But if you are looking for meat from animals which were treated better than usual, then you can look for certified organic products. The EU regulation on organic products mandates standards for animal welfare which go beyond what's ...


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In general, most cured meat found in supermarket come from industrial producers. Some are very good and use good produces (more expensive, but not always); you need to look at the labels (ingredients and provenance). For better products, go to a smaller butcher/Feinkost/delicatessen and ask about the provenance of their produces; ask about local products. ...


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It's quite the challenge. The two things I do are lift the thin end off the hot surface with something spatula-like or the edge of the pan, leaving the thicker part on the heat. The other thing is sear relatively quickly and then move the whole pan with fish in it to the oven, this method good with very thick meat. There's also the option of sous vide.


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Suet is a particular fat from around the kidney area of cattle, it is not intramuscular. I just learned from the other poster that adipose is considered a type of connective tissue, so from that perspective they are the same thing. However, I when chefs say it the fat would be something flavorful that you can render easily, and connective tissue would be a ...


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