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1

Sheep are raised almost exclusively on grass, whereas beef cattle (particularly the kind that will be turned into thin slices, rather than overpriced steaks) will be finished on grain feed. Grass-fed beef and mutton will have yellow-tinged fat while grain-fed beef will have white fat. So if one of the meats has a slightly yellower fat, that's almost ...


5

What makes a difference in great tasting meat dishes: fresh ingredients (specially the meat) seasonings, spices fat (from the meat itself) browning the meat to develop flavours (frying in oil or broiling in the oven) not burning and not overcooking, which just makes it dry + colourless + flavourless All of which you seemed to follow. I'm not sure where are ...


4

I think what you might have experienced is - a tissue steak. I frequently buy strip loins, and there's a very specific thing you need to look for when buying them. If there's a prominent 'half circle' of gristle - you're probably dealing with a strip loin that was cut from the less pleasant end of the primal (sirloin end.) They are notoriously chewy and ...


0

For tough cuts of beef, dry brining is a wonderful technique. I also question, as above, if this cut would be considered tough.


0

I would recommend splitting the vegetables: some from the start for taste and some later for show. The first ones are discarded when sieving/reducing the sauce. The others can be coloured by roasting or glazing in water/butter. You can also shape them the way you want and preserve that shape. This will achieve your twin objective of taste and looks.


1

This sounds similar to something my mother used to cook, she would get oyster blade and put onion and gravy powder on top before wrapping it in tin foil and putting it in the oven. The result was a tender piece of meat with a thick brown gravy on top, it tended to be more on the salty side due to the use of pure gravy powder, was the meat salty?


1

I roast the root vegetables, then add for the last 30 minutes. I find boiled vegetables uninteresting. Roasted vegetables bring flavor and great texture. Trying to time it just right to the meat's doneness is almost impossible. You never know how long the vegetables will take in the stew.


5

I see nothing about letting the steak rest after cooking, which should be done for at least 5-10 minutes if not more for really thick cuts. If you cut into the steak immediately, all of the juices end up on the cutting board/plate, and not in your mouth.


11

I agree with part of moscafj's answer in regard to grading: the lack of marbling may have contributed to dryness as well as some reduction in tenderness. However, I'm not sure that I agree that a strip loin steak is "not the most tender cut of meat to begin with." It's cut from the back part of the longissimus dorsi muscle (a muscle that receives very ...


18

You must be in Canada. The Canadian beef grading system is as follows, and these are all considered in the category of "high quality": Prime - abundant marbling, about 2 percent of beef is graded as prime AAA - small amounts of visual marbling, very high quality, up to 50% is graded AAA AA - slight amount of marbling, a step down from AAA, 45% of beef is ...


0

I’ve found that dried bacon chunks work nicely. When I cook pasta, the typical recipe I use is a packet of pasta (four serves), a jar of bolognese sauce (four serves), and a generous pouring of shredded dried bacon - typically from Costco because it’s the only supermarket that seems to sell it in Australia. Once the sauce starts making bubbling noises, I ...


2

To clarify, after your comments on Moscafj's answer and your comments: To have your sausages safe, it is not enough to have them in an oven set to 150 F. Rather, you have to ensure that their internal temperature goes from room to over 140 quickly enough (less than 2 hours), and this won't happen in an oven set to 150 F. It can happen either in an oven set ...


4

You would potentially grow bacteria that would make you sick. The production of cured sausage has to follow a specific process that makes use of the correct balance of salt, water activity, and acidity (often, along with the addition of nitrates) to create a safe product. You can certainly make fresh sausage and cook fully, or refrigerate for a few days, ...


1

I ended up removing the bacon after the slow roast in order to sear the fat cap at the end. It turned out okay. Next time I think I’ll just use the bacon to impart the flavors during the marinading/aging process, and cook it without bacon wrap. I think the crust would come out better that way.


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