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37

The common method would be to cook the pasta in advance, then shock it in cold water to stop the cooking before draining and refrigerating it. You would then heat it up in boiling water for about 20 seconds just to heat it through. You would just need a portable burner to keep a pot of water boiling for service. On the other hand, 20 pounds of pasta for ...


29

Red pizza sauce is often (but not always) two things: Thicker. Thinner sauce will tend to run in the oven and also steam the pizza crust as it cooks - if loaded with toppings, otherwise thin is fine. Depending on the crust, the heat of the oven, the toppings above sauce, and how watery it is, this may not be needed. If you've just got some crushed ...


24

A tall thin pot is a hazard as it can be tipped over all too easily The book says use lots of water to ensure even cooking and to stop the pasta sticking. But regular stirring will solve this problem too Just use less water in a regular pot and feed the pasta into the boiling water. It takes about 30 seconds for long spaghetti to soften enough for it to ...


22

As a variation to SAJ14SAJ's suggestion: Cook and shock it as suggested, but instead of heating it back up in water, heat it back up in whatever sauce you're using. You'll want to pull the pasta early (a little before al dente), and should save some of the pasta water so that you can thin back out the sauce if the pasta starts absorbing too much. (the ...


18

Marinara is a style / kind of a sauce that originated in Napoli usually made with tomatoes, garlic, herbs, and onions. A spaghetti sauce only says where to sauce is used (obviously on spaghetti) but doesn't say anything about what the sauce is exactly like. There are many dishes which are basically spaghetti + sauce: Spaghetti alla marinara – which ...


16

Yes, cooking it more to evaporate off some of the liquid will definitely help. This is called reducing a sauce. A moderate simmer would be the appropriate temperature. You want to see occasional bubbles but definitely not a rolling boil. Stir it occasionally, making sure to get the bottom of the pot to avoid any scorching. It is possible to have it be quite ...


15

OK I can read Chinese and let me tell you the answer: the noodles you bought are made by eggs. They're not made by rice. (FYI, there are TWO kinds noodles called "Rice Noodles", they are actually made by rice. The two kinds varies in thickness). You can first make soup noodles to grasp the texture of the noodles you bought. Try undercook and overcook a bit, ...


13

Canned spaghetti unfortunately is still something that can be bought at supermarkets. A common brand for canned pasta is Chef Boyardee. They have ravioli, spaghetti and sometimes even canned meatballs inside the spaghetti. These spaghetti will have a very very soft texture similar to what you would expect the spaghetti texture to be if you overcook it by ...


12

Italians weigh it and it's really the only fail-safe way. Using a kitchen scale with a big bowl on top should work for just about any pasta shape. 40g for a small portion, 100g for a big plate full. Cooked volume will depend on the type of pasta, but with spaghetti for example about 55g of dry will produce about 1 cup of cooked spaghetti. This agrees ...


12

No, it's not true. It will not change the way they cook. Noodle cooking times vary by what they're made out of and by thickness, not by the length of the noodles. The kids and I seem to prefer eating shorter noodles and dodging the hassle of spinning the noodles, but when there's company over we tend to do it the classic "right" way. No difference in taste.


12

The technique that many restaurants will use is to prepare the pasta ahead of time and store it in or on ice water. The chilled pasta may be then submerged briefly in boiling water and served.


12

No, it has nothing to do with the acidity of your sauce. It took a lot longer to cook because of the prevalent temperature throughout the pan, and the mass of the material being heated. Sauce + Noodles is a lot to heat up, a lot more than just a pot of water. It's also unlikely you fully boiled the Sauce + Noodles as you would have with water (to a full ...


11

In short, using port as a substitute for red wine will not wreck the dish. Though the flavour is different (and richer) and will make your bolognese taste different as a result, the taste should not be bad. I frequently do this as I am not a red wine drinker, and port keeps far better in an open bottle. I would recommend using slightly less than when using ...


10

I imagine you are thinking of spaghetti curvati (o spaghetti con curva, that is, spaghetti with a bend). It is a pasta format typical of Southern Italy. Some brands refer to those as spaghetti lunghi (long spaghetti). I am not aware of a specific name for them, although I am fairly sure there are names in various Italian dialects.


10

When you ask about "pizza sauce" I'll have to assume you mean the tomato-based sauce that became the norm for just about all pizzas in North America since about 1955 when we crawled out of our meat & potato caves and started to try new things. (Thank you E.D. & J.C.) The reality is that there really isn't a "pizza" sauce. There is pizza and ...


10

There are a few things you can do to thicken your sauce: Simmer - you can simmer the sauce at a low heat for quite a long time without affecting the flavour (generally improves it). Many Bolognese sauces are simmered for 30+ minutes. Thicken - add 1-2 tbsp of corn starch (or flour tempered). Many commercial sauces do this. Add paste - add a small tin of ...


10

I've asked this question to many friends of mine from Rome, and they all agree that only yolks should be used. Then I managed to find out the scientific reason behind this. The real challenge with this recipe, which makes the difference between a perfectly made creamy carbonara and just pasta with omelette, lies in temperature control. As a matter of fact, ...


9

Well, one obvious answer is to look at the number of portions in the box. (This is found in the nutrition information.) Then divide the amount in the box by the number of portions. I just pulled down a box of linguine from my shelf. One pound yields eight 2 oz. portions. Which means all you have to do is divide in half three times. It won't be exact, but ...


9

Salt should be put before putting the spaghetti (or any other type of pasta for that matters) in the water. For 200g spaghetti (2 people) count ~2-3 liters of water and 20-30g rock salt. You can reduce the amount of salt if the sauce you are using is already quite salty. As a note to your point 2, the salt INCREASES the boiling point of water (a process ...


8

Your suggested design would topple over very easily, especially on a gas hob with a grate, risking serious injury. Aside from safety concerns, your design would also be inefficient as there is an extremely low surface area in contact with the hob. It would therefore take longer to heat up. Since the pasta is bunched together, there is a lower surface area ...


8

There is a legal difference: according to Italian law, pasta (which includes spaghetti) is made only with durum wheat. Other countries also accept soft wheat. The difference is in the amount of protein (mostly gluten): durum wheat has more, which in turn gives the pasta a somewhat snappier bite. Also, the cooked pasta stays eatable (as in, non-mushy) for a ...


8

You don't want to keep it warm -- that will lead to it steaming itself and overcooking. You need to get it cold and reasonably dry as quickly as possible so that it will stop absorbing water for the hour that it is sitting around, then reheat it quickly at the last minute. Undercook the pasta slightly -- by somewhere between two and one minutes -- so that ...


8

My name is Megan Scott and I work, along with my husband John Becker, for the Joy of Cooking. The short answer is that this is one of the many reasons we revise the cookbook every 10 years or so! We don't know exactly what this recipe is referring to (and can't ask Marion Becker, who died right after the 1975 edition came out), although we assume it means a ...


8

That's a manually operated Food Mill/Ricer/Puree-Maker. The Wikipedia Article for Food Mill shows a pic of the same model you have and from that article: Uses of a food mill include removing the seeds from cooked tomatoes, removing pulp or larger pieces from foods (creating apple jelly or any type of purée), and making mashed potatoes or spätzle. ...


8

If the canned good is already "spaghetti sauce", it simply needs to be heated. There is no need to cook it for hours. If you are beginning with canned tomatoes, and making your own sauce, 20 to 30 minutes is usually enough to cook a basic Italian tomato sauce.


7

Tomato suace in a pizza parlour is typically prepared uncooked. Since pizza ovens can reach temps in excess of 800 °F (430 °C), the sauce cooks on the pizza. Precooking sauce can "overcook" in the pizza oven. Also, traditional Neapolitan pizza philosophy is "less is more", so the sauce tends to be very basic with a few to no ingredients added. I add oregano,...


7

Salt doesn't lower the boiling point of water, it elevates it. Even so, the amount of salt you add to pasta water (10g/litre is a good guide) will barely make a difference. You need to add nearly 6 times that amount of salt to a litre of water to raise its boiling point by 0.5°C. As throwing things into boiling water can result in splashing, I suggest ...


7

The more stable sauces I've seen use the 3 whole eggs to 1 yolk ratio. However, the reason the recipes disagree might have to do with the following: Published March 1, 2013. Cook's Illustrated: The hardest part about making carbonara isn’t coming up with the right ratio of egg whites to yolks to make a creamy, rich sauce; it’s figuring out how to make ...


7

Put the pesto in just as the sauce is done and as you're taking it off the heat. Generally, pesto does not benefit at all from cooking. By adding it to the sauce just as it is being pulled from the heat, it's temp will equalize with the sauce, without being cooked. Are you planning to serve this over pasta? If so, drain the pasta (save some of the pasta ...


6

Contra the previous answers: when using fresh tomatoes, one key to avoiding watery tomato sauce (and sauces based on many other kinds of vegetable purees) is to bring to close to a boil quickly at the start. Fresh tomatoes contain natural enzymes which will break down pectin and other other thickening components. By heating rapidly to a boil (or nearly so) ...


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