37

The common method would be to cook the pasta in advance, then shock it in cold water to stop the cooking before draining and refrigerating it. You would then heat it up in boiling water for about 20 seconds just to heat it through. You would just need a portable burner to keep a pot of water boiling for service. On the other hand, 20 pounds of pasta for ...


22

As a variation to SAJ14SAJ's suggestion: Cook and shock it as suggested, but instead of heating it back up in water, heat it back up in whatever sauce you're using. You'll want to pull the pasta early (a little before al dente), and should save some of the pasta water so that you can thin back out the sauce if the pasta starts absorbing too much. (the ...


18

Marinara is a style / kind of a sauce that originated in Napoli usually made with tomatoes, garlic, herbs, and onions. A spaghetti sauce only says where to sauce is used (obviously on spaghetti) but doesn't say anything about what the sauce is exactly like. There are many dishes which are basically spaghetti + sauce: Spaghetti alla marinara – which ...


16

I've asked this question to many friends of mine from Rome, and they all agree that only yolks should be used. Then I managed to find out the scientific reason behind this. The real challenge with this recipe, which makes the difference between a perfectly made creamy carbonara and just pasta with omelette, lies in temperature control. As a matter of fact, ...


15

OK I can read Chinese and let me tell you the answer: the noodles you bought are made by eggs. They're not made by rice. (FYI, there are TWO kinds noodles called "Rice Noodles", they are actually made by rice. The two kinds varies in thickness). You can first make soup noodles to grasp the texture of the noodles you bought. Try undercook and overcook a bit, ...


13

Canned spaghetti unfortunately is still something that can be bought at supermarkets. A common brand for canned pasta is Chef Boyardee. They have ravioli, spaghetti and sometimes even canned meatballs inside the spaghetti. These spaghetti will have a very very soft texture similar to what you would expect the spaghetti texture to be if you overcook it by ...


12

No, it has nothing to do with the acidity of your sauce. It took a lot longer to cook because of the prevalent temperature throughout the pan, and the mass of the material being heated. Sauce + Noodles is a lot to heat up, a lot more than just a pot of water. It's also unlikely you fully boiled the Sauce + Noodles as you would have with water (to a full ...


11

In short, using port as a substitute for red wine will not wreck the dish. Though the flavour is different (and richer) and will make your bolognese taste different as a result, the taste should not be bad. I frequently do this as I am not a red wine drinker, and port keeps far better in an open bottle. I would recommend using slightly less than when using ...


9

Salt should be put before putting the spaghetti (or any other type of pasta for that matters) in the water. For 200g spaghetti (2 people) count ~2-3 liters of water and 20-30g rock salt. You can reduce the amount of salt if the sauce you are using is already quite salty. As a note to your point 2, the salt INCREASES the boiling point of water (a process ...


9

The more stable sauces I've seen use the 3 whole eggs to 1 yolk ratio. However, the reason the recipes disagree might have to do with the following: Published March 1, 2013. Cook's Illustrated: The hardest part about making carbonara isn’t coming up with the right ratio of egg whites to yolks to make a creamy, rich sauce; it’s figuring out how to make a ...


9

My name is Megan Scott and I work, along with my husband John Becker, for the Joy of Cooking. The short answer is that this is one of the many reasons we revise the cookbook every 10 years or so! We don't know exactly what this recipe is referring to (and can't ask Marion Becker, who died right after the 1975 edition came out), although we assume it means a ...


8

Contra the previous answers: when using fresh tomatoes, one key to avoiding watery tomato sauce (and sauces based on many other kinds of vegetable purees) is to bring to close to a boil quickly at the start. Fresh tomatoes contain natural enzymes which will break down pectin and other other thickening components. By heating rapidly to a boil (or nearly so) ...


8

"Authentic" carbonara does not have cream. It's made with just guanciale, egg (yolks and whites), pecorino romano, and black pepper. Thanks to @GiuppeP for the clarification. However, at least in the US (and, it appears, Canada) there is tremendous variation to what folks call "carbonara". What is more relevant to the question is technique. Whether you ...


8

That's a manually operated Food Mill/Ricer/Puree-Maker. The Wikipedia Article for Food Mill shows a pic of the same model you have and from that article: Uses of a food mill include removing the seeds from cooked tomatoes, removing pulp or larger pieces from foods (creating apple jelly or any type of purée), and making mashed potatoes or spätzle. ...


7

Salt doesn't lower the boiling point of water, it elevates it. Even so, the amount of salt you add to pasta water (10g/litre is a good guide) will barely make a difference. You need to add nearly 6 times that amount of salt to a litre of water to raise its boiling point by 0.5°C. As throwing things into boiling water can result in splashing, I suggest ...


7

Put the pesto in just as the sauce is done and as you're taking it off the heat. Generally, pesto does not benefit at all from cooking. By adding it to the sauce just as it is being pulled from the heat, it's temp will equalize with the sauce, without being cooked. Are you planning to serve this over pasta? If so, drain the pasta (save some of the pasta ...


7

If the canned good is already "spaghetti sauce", it simply needs to be heated. There is no need to cook it for hours. If you are beginning with canned tomatoes, and making your own sauce, 20 to 30 minutes is usually enough to cook a basic Italian tomato sauce.


6

I love the Kraft Tangy Italian spaghetti sauce seasonings and I just experimented with several of the suggestions listed above. I added some dried crushed red peppers into a blender along with Garlic Powder, Onion Powder, Dried parsley leaves and an off brand "Italian Seasonings" blend of dried herbs and blended them all together. That was a good start, but ...


6

In Germany there is a „Spickzwiebel“ especially for red cabbage. You put your bayleave on the onion and attach it with cloves. For other dishes I use onions the same way but substitute the cloves with a sprig of rosemary or some other hard herb. Works best if herb bags are too small for lager sprigs that don‘t fit the bag.


6

You can not prevent your pasta from overcooking but you can make it more mushy (and unpalatable) The effect of acidity is very noticeable with potatoes, adding a shot of vinegar will let you cook almost paper-thin slices without them falling apart, while adding soda does the opposite. This article goes in detail and has close-up images of the results I ...


5

Felicity Cloake has done the hard work of comparing carbonara recipes, and her conclusion is: Eggs is eggs Of course, as ever, it's not that simple. Should I use whole eggs, as in the Nigella Lawson, Silver Spoon, Elizabeth David and Ursula Ferrigno recipes, egg yolks, as the River Cafe and Prawn Cocktail Years suggest, or a mixture of the two, like Anna ...


5

Yes and no; in smaller quantities; no problem. If you sit down in the morning and eat bowl daily; you will cause some serious long term issues. Raw flour is full of lectins and phytates; which can pose a danger in higher amounts; damage the lower GI and cause IBS; other issues Nutrient problems can develop from the raw flour intake at higher amounts ...


5

In Italy, besciamella is usually only used on pasta when it's going to be cooked in the oven: pasta al gratin, pasta al forno, or as part of lasagne. As for your question - is it authentic to just toss some pasta with it? I would use the same method I'd use to answer the infamous "is X a sandwich?" questions: if somebody asked for a plate of spaghetti at a ...


5

Easy....cook per the package instruction, with no oil in water. Drain well through a strainer. Allow to sit in the strainer or in a bowl long enough to allow the moisture to flash off. Your pasta will be sticky and clumpy. To further enhance the effect, refrigerate. Saucing or oil will separate the strands, If you like to eat it that way, there are ...


4

In Italy, they have a numbering system with corresponding names for each number. Larger numbers indicate thicker noodles. Some US manufacturers use the same numbering system. Here is a listing from an extrusion die manufacturer. See the full list here Pasta Shapes.pdf #1 0.6 mm. #2 0.7 mm. #3 0.8 mm. #4 0.9 mm. #5 1.1 mm. #6 1.3 mm. #7 1.5 mm. #8 1....


4

For me only ever the yolks. I don't add them to the sauce while I'm cooking. I just sit two egg yolks on top of everyone's portion covered with chopped dill and black pepper so it looks all cheffy. This is because I want to get as far away as possible from the gooey white muck you get in a jar. The egg whites act as an emulsifier for the sauce, so the ...


4

Boil the noodles until almost done, then rinse them thoroughly in cold water to wash off the surface starch. Toss with a little oil (sesame is nice) to prevent sticking, and leave in the colander to dry out further. Then stir fry when ready.


4

In the U.S. Marinara is a vegetarian Italian style tomato sauce and it may have olive oil and cheese like parmesan mixed in. But never meat or anchovies. Spaghetti Sauce in the U.S. is culinary slang for manufactured tomato sauce served over spaghetti.


4

Marinara sauce is actual a thin tomato sauce used originally on fish foods, hence the name Marinara! In Naples Italy when the fishermen came home with the fish they caught for the day the wives would fix a thin tomato sauce used in cooking and serving the fish. Marinara sauce is not started with any meat or meat flavoring or onions like a thick tomato ...


4

Marinara sauce is a specific sauce, made with tomatoes, and probably garlic, onions, and herbs. Spaghetti sauce, in the US, means something tomato-based, possibly with meat. I suppose it's based roughly on marinara or bolognese, depending on what variety you have. Pasta sauce means absolutely any sauce you can put on pasta. Maybe some people have specific ...


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