7

Grit means very little for sharpness beyond ~2000. Far more important is a consistent angle. This is a good article that explains the angles a good sharpening tool will have a angle guide, something like this I'd recommend against "eyeballing" it the first few times. Joerg Sprave made a nice video explaining a lot, he uses the Gatco set I linked. And ...


5

You need a bladed spice grinder, also branded as bladed coffee grinders. To have a consistent result, sift the result.


4

This is a modern day version of a Foley Fork. Authentic ones are very rare and collectible. My Aunt swore she could not make her (Best in the world) yeast rolls without her Foley Fork for the dough.


4

The answer is almost certainly yes. In 99% of cases, you can use that cookware on your normal stove. In the remaining 1%, you can't, but being induction-ready is not the reason why you can't, it just so happens that there are some designs which won't work on a normal stove but will work on induction. Being induction-ready means that it is made of a ...


3

There is no set way of knowing exactly what grit to use but you can estimate. <1000 grit is for repair, so I would suggest visual inspecting the blades edge under a light. If there are any points that reflect light differently, or that you can see any damage, then use the 400 grit until the edge is consistent. If your knife passes the visual check, but ...


3

These days all cookware comes with a list of what it can & cannot be used with, usually as a set of symbols &/or text. Something along these lines, but no two manufacturers use the exact same symbols… Image from Pinterest, original source is 404 Just look for something compatible with your existing & potential future requirements.


2

Its a butter spade. They come in so many forms, anything heart-shaped and mounted sideways is a butter spade. Butter spades have a triangular or heart shaped blade usually connected to a round, turned ivory or wooden handle, although completely silver examples are found. They are very collectable and generally date from the mid-late 18th Century. Examples ...


2

I would use my mortar and pestle. source I have been thru many coffee bean grinders. I still use the mortar and pestle I bought in 1992. It is easy to get the spices out. It is easy to clean. It is easy to control the grind. If spices are wet, or greasy, it works. It was cheap. It is old school.


2

Not long ago I managed to do that with just a regular blender. Put chili flakes in and whirl until powdered. Do not remove the lid before chili powder settles. Then gently sift for very consistent result. I wouldn't really recommend using a coffee grinder because that would bring too much heat in.


2

the little LED screen above each knob would ask you for the pan type (standard, cast-iron, or nonstick) before it'd let you ignite the burner there'd be a little tune like a plane makes, so you'd know YOU had full control. When a pan is taken off the burner, there will be a rapid "dingdingdingding..." for 10 seconds, and then the burner would shut off. ...


2

I am not sure if you can prevent the nozzle from ever clogging, though I am trying the regular olive oil now. I tried the spraying hot water method which was helpful, but didn't completely clear the nozzle. I have been using extra virgin olive oil. The tool that did the trick is a DenTek Easy Brush for Extra Tight Spaces, if you happen to have one lying ...


2

Unless, I'm not seeing something in the photo, those appear to be scratches and not cracks. I don't see any reason to doubt the integrity of the stoneware.


2

I actually think that is an old-style duster handle, not a food processing tool. Used with disposable dusting units with a tube that slides over then handle. It is clearly not for cooking IMHO. Something like this more modern unit. I could be wrong, but that's certainly what it looks like>


1

I contacted Pampered Chef customer service; they asked for a photo, and they determined that it was a defect and they are sending me a new replacement. So they are being on the safe side.


1

As mentioned above, almost all heavy creams (ie whipping creams) have emulsifiers (gums) that keep the cream from separating (ideal for making whipping cream). I just made a batch of cultured heavy cream and found that my kitchenaid stand mixer was not able to churn the cream enough to separate it...It mixed and mixed and mixed without any separation...I ...


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