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25

I'm culling a lot of information from one of my favorite cocktail books for this one. Yes, limes have a slightly higher acid content (on average) than lemons do - about 6% for limes, compared to 4.5% for lemons. More importantly for their flavor, lemons have about 2% total sugar, while limes have somewhere between 0.5% and 0.75%. Sugar/sweetness has quite ...


16

Heavier limes tend to be more juicy, but another important factor is the color and texture of the skin. Look for the brightest green (sometimes with almost a yellow tinge) and smoothest skin you can find. Many bumps or shriveled looking areas are good indications that there will be less juice. If that's all that's available in your store, though, just get ...


8

It seems to me, that a quality planar grater is the best solution. The Spin Zester is way too expensive for a home kitchen. I can recommend this fine micro plane grater for zesting:


8

I'd be a little concerned about mixing aluminum foil with acid foods. Aluminum acetate has an astringent taste. I'm not finding it on the internet, but aluminum citrate (from citric acid in the lime juice) likely has a similar flavor. Here's a recent, and seemingly reputable look at cooking acid foods in Aluminum foil (PDF file): Risk Assessment of Using ...


8

The juiciest limes will generally be the heaviest ones. Water is dense, citrus peel and dry citrus are not so much.


8

The most tell-tale factor I have found -- and this applies to lemons and oranges too -- is the thickness of the pith. When there's a half inch of that bitter white stuff, the pulp which contains all the juice is necessarily reduced in size. This seems to vary seasonally. It is most easily tested by rolling the fruit on a table under your palm, with gentle ...


7

Lime juice isn't going to make it less spicy, if anything I've found it accentuates the spiciness a bit although I'm not sure of the mechanism. It could be that the acidity frees up more capsaicin compounds (what makes hot food hot), or wakes up your taste buds more. Most likely you have simply added a weak jalapeno. Peppers of the same variety can vary ...


6

Calcium hydroxide is pretty much insoluble, so it's hard to get every last bit of it out after nixtamalizing. A trace always remains. If the maker were selling lime flavored tortilla chips, which are sold the ingredient list would say something like "lime extract" or "natural lime flavor".


6

The general things to keep in mind are: Don't mix a ton of the hot mixture into the eggs at once. Add a little at a time. Don't use too high heat. It's better to be slow about this than to have scrambled eggs. Don't overheat before you temper the eggs. Go only as far as the recipe says to. If it's too hot, you might be fine if you temper carefully, but ...


5

Lime juice is one of the components of green curry. The acid from the lime juice macerates some of the other ingredients and wakens up some other flavors. If you don't add it as part of the paste preparation, then you aren't cooking with Green Curry. If you add the lime juice in the end, you will have a very different result, mostly that of a dish that ...


5

The problem is that you likely cannot afford it. It is done by vacuum, so the machine (rotovap) will cost you about 10 000 dollars, or you can find a few Chinese noname suppliers for maybe 6 000. It is an amazing thing to play with in the kitchen, but it will cover the cost of buying supermarket lemons for several lifetimes. Any conventional ways of ...


4

To prevent this from happening, apart from what Jefromi says, check the temperature with a thermometer. Eggs start coagulating around 60ºC. If you keep the temperature around 55ºC you are pasteurizing the eggs at the same time.


4

There's the option of using Kaffir Lime essential oil - it is the best substitute I know of, much better than the dried Kaffir Lime leaves we can get around here (Israel). It is truly wonderful. Here's the one I use: http://thaifoodessentials.com/buy/ It's quite cheap and lasts for a long time (you only need a few drops per dish). The website also has ...


4

When I need larger amounts of zest, I peel the fruit with a knife as best I can, scrape off the white part, and then use a food processor or finely chop it. This is slower for small amounts, but much faster for large amounts.


4

Cook's Illustrated recommends storing lemons in the fridge in a tightly sealed ziptop bag with the excess air removed. I would imagine that the same applies to limes. As I understand it, the idea is to prevent air circulation in order to reduce the rate of dehydration. Ref at thekitchn.com


4

My daughter who loves lemon cake thought of a great idea a couple years ago to knock the lemon flavor out of the park. I'm sure it would work for lime too: make a lime syrup and pour it into the bottom of the cake after poking it all over with a thin skewer. The more lime you like, the more syrup you use. As a bonus, it also adds some moisture to the cake. ...


3

When you add lime juice to any dish and heat it, the flavours of the dish are lost... You surely are trying to get a citrus flavour of lemon which will be pretty much suppressed if you heat it. In case you need lemon aroma, crush lemon grass; tie in a cloth and put it in ur curry and boil.. After few minutes remove the cloth. If you need the Tangy flavor....


3

For me, it's not so much about the vitamins as the taste. All the citrus juice I've ever tried to cook with has lost most of it's flavor and become bitter when heated for more than a few minutes. Zest can be added earlier (and will give some good flavor) but I'd save any citrus juice for near the end of the recipe.


3

Well I live in Mexico, and here we eat lime and almost every dish, but here is known as lemon even is not (some misconceptions when got to traduce on the very begininig it arrived to Mexico). When I make guacamole I use lime and extra virgin oil, and if u put some virgin olive oil on a cut avocado will last longer. However, we used cilantro and onion (not ...


3

Since I assume it is too late to do anything to take the lime away, undermine excess flavor of lime with roasted peppers. They will bear a pleasant complement to the tartness while adding rich, smoky notes. Hotter peppers will further distract from the excess lime. A sweet corn salsa would also add sweetness to anchor the lime.


3

It's a common misconception that organic produce doesn't use any kind of pesticides (insecticide, herbicide or fungicide) or other 'chemicals'. Unless you're buying apples from someone's back yard, there is some form of pesticide on it. Organic produce is simply limited on which types of pesticides they can use. Your limes will certainly have an 'organic' ...


2

I used to buy curry and kaffir lime leaves at the DeKalb farmer's mkt (Atlanta), but have been told recently that the USDA has banned import in attempt to preempt certain microbes, bacteria, diseases. Dunno what that is really about. In the end, they are no longer available there. However, if you live in a tropical, sub-tropical latitude, you can grow your ...


2

I hope this helps, try chopping up a whole bunch of celery, It seems to absorb the bitter and nutralize the taste, It worked for me when I made a base for rice with way to much menthi Indian spice and the bitterness was unbearable, It worked for me and I hope this helps you to! I also added a little vinagar and sugar.


2

2 weeks minimum. If it's in an air tight and sterilized jar which isn't constantly being opened and closed. I'd push more for a couple of months maybe longer. All the acid in there, sugar and salt work as great preservatives and the spices also will help. The 2 things you need to be watching for are either the oil going rancid or the juice fermenting. ...


2

Without seeing the recipe, it's difficult to know what can be improved. Here are some possibiliies: Your easiest addition would be to add more lime zest -- it contains much of the flavor, and it won't significantly throw off the moisture or acid balance in the cake. If you're going to be stacking the cake, instead of using frosting between the layers, you ...


2

I see all the answers leaning toward the negative but wonder whether the responders actually tested their theories. I recently had a similar experience with habaneros and lime juice, that is I added my usual number of habaneros plus seeds to salsa, but used two noticeably juicier limes and my salsa had almost no heat and the flavor of lime was much more ...


2

No it won't be a problem. For safe canning, time, temperature and sufficient acidity are the relevant variables. Neither is affected by your substitution. Taste-wise switching from lemon to lime will change the results, but obviously that is exactly your goal. (Nice idea, that "Strawberry Margarita preserve" btw.)


2

If you can't taste it, but others can, chemical composition of the essential oils might prove a useful guide for you. Ingredients of Orange, Lemon and Lime oils: First line shows components common to two or more of the fruits. Second line shows components unique to each fruit. lemon oil a-pinene, b-pinene, myrcene, limonene, linalool, sabinene, neral ...


2

I test limes (and lemons) at the grocery store by squeezing them. If it's hard, don't get it. If it's slightly squishy, it's juicier. This has worked pretty well for me. Most of the limes I see at the store are quite hard, and don't seem to have much juice.


1

Unfortunately, flavor is extremely difficult to describe; generally making comparisons is about the best we can do. Your quote is pretty good at describing the differences, certainly better than I could do. Of course, if you're making lemonade for yourself the only person you have to please is yourself. If you're making lemonade to share, then I recommend ...


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