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25

I'm culling a lot of information from one of my favorite cocktail books for this one. Yes, limes have a slightly higher acid content (on average) than lemons do - about 6% for limes, compared to 4.5% for lemons. More importantly for their flavor, lemons have about 2% total sugar, while limes have somewhere between 0.5% and 0.75%. Sugar/sweetness has quite ...


23

After searching different places, I could not find a clear answer. I therefor decided to measure it myselfe. I bought a bunch of normal sized lemons, and squeezed them. On average, the lemons I bought yelded 55ml, thats 3,67 tablespoons of juice per lemon.


17

Lemon juice and lemon zest have a different taste. Lemon juice has obviously more water, is tart (adds fruitiness and freshness to the dish) and the aroma is not as intense as in the zest. If you bake a cake or cookies it's often more desirable to use lemon zest because it doesn't mess up the water-solids-ratio and what you often want is a rather sweet cake/...


12

Can't comment on the nutritional side of things, but the main reason I can think of for not always including it is that it has a slightly different flavour. A much more intense lemon flavour is provided by the zest while the juice has the more tart elements (and of course water). If you're just interested in avoiding waste, you can freeze the zest.


11

The best way to remove wax from citrus is simply to wash it with dish soap under warm, running water. Don't obsess about how long you should wash the fruit; usually the wax application is very thin and quickly removed. There is no easy way to tell whether you have removed the wax, so if you return citrus to fridge after removing the wax, you might want to ...


11

This is totally not a problem. This style of lemon preservation relies on fermentation. The salt is not intended to halt all fermentation- it just restricts it to the tasty kind. Fermented pickles are a common and traditional way to preserve food because the salt and acid and thriving tasty bacteria make a very inhospitable environment for bad bugs. The ...


10

This is not yogurt per definition, you are making a fresh cheese. You can actually use other types of milk for such a cheese, but the mouthfeel and taste will be very different and won't be as similar to yogurt. There is a large class of acid-curdled cheeses, including paneer, tvorog, quark and many others. I don't know if yours has a specific name. I know ...


10

The 'lemony' flavour in a lemon cake is from the volatile oils which are present in the fruit's zest,(mainly nerol, limonene and citral). I would'nt advise adding actual lemon juice to the cake as it will disrupt the ratios in the cake recipe and ususally the tart, zingy flavour gets lost anyway after baking. To get a really lemony flavour whilst still using ...


9

First, those are not a "tin" which may explain why you've had trouble finding them. They are individual tart rings which must be placed on a baking sheet. Sometimes they're called flan rings or, if they're larger, cake rings. If you do a Google search with Australia "tart ring" you'll see that plenty of baking supply businesses in AU sell them. Good ...


9

There is unlikely to be any single answer to my question since the coating can be any one of a number of substances including, Natural or synthetic resins Carnauba wax Shellac Tall oil Paraffin Oxidised polyethylene Candelilla wax Beeswax Corn, soy or milk proteins These may be disolved in a petroleum based solvent, emulsified with a detergent or modified ...


9

In Israel I have often seen hummus/falafel/thina served with a hot sauce called skhug, I have mostly seen the green variety (skhug yarok), which is a sauce made of fresh herbs, garlic, chili, lemon juice, garlic, olive oil, and some spices. Hummus is often just served with thina on the side and with olive oil, but there is a lot of variety ... I have seen ...


9

Lemon, herbs, onions, and garlic too are all aromatics that infuse into the chicken as it cooks giving it a lovely flavor. It doesn't absorb the flavors enough to call it a lemon chicken, but gives the chicken some flavor depth and acts as an enhancement. Stuffing the chicken helps these flavors to infuse better into the meat than spreading them around. Salt ...


9

Lemon juice adds both lemon flavor and sourness whereas the zest only adds the lemon flavor. There are instances in which you only want the freshness of the lemon flavor but not the sourness. One example would be when you are working with dairy. The acidity can curdle milk. You would use zest in this case.


8

You can neutralize the acidity of your drink by adding a half teaspoon of baking soda, but don't do this. Apart from fizzing up like a volcano, your lemon drink, or what is left of it, will taste pretty awful. What you want to do is reduce the perceived acidity. This can be done simply by adding more honey. I suggest adding a teaspoon at a time until it ...


7

It makes the lemon easier to squeeze. I think it has the most effect on the peel; it's softer and more flexible when warm, so you're able to get more juice out of it than you could otherwise if you're juicing by hand. That's especially true if you're trying to juice several lemons - you'll just get tired and stop being as thorough if it's harder. It ...


7

The easiest way is just use a recipe for lemon cookies. I'm sure you can find lots of them online. If you really want to use a recipe for normal cookies (because you really like it), you could certainly add lemon extract to a regular batch. Don't add too much, the flavour is really concentrated. Since you won't use a lot of it (a teaspoon will do), the ...


7

Sometimes you're using the juice for its flavour, and in those cases assuming you're fine with the solid material in there, it can make sense to add the zest. In other cases, like in making paneer, the critical component is the acid content of the juice to carry out a chemical process, rather than its flavour.


7

I don't think this is practically possible with lemon juice, as milk protein will curdle in the presence of acid (in this case, citric acid in the lemon juice)—and the process happens much more quickly at hotter temperatures, as in tea. A pinch of salt may slow the process, but is likely to be unpalatable. You could neutralize the acid with baking ...


7

I use lemon zest in my tea while its steeping, then I strain it through a fine strainer. Gives you all the benefits and no curdling.


7

Lemon curd is not cooked so much for a time—in general times are only guidelines to help cooks not yet familiar with a recipe do planning—as they are to a specific outcome. The traditional test for lemon curd (and all custards, really) is the nappe, or coating the back of a spoon. If you dip a spoon into the curd, and then run your finger ...


7

When I've used Meyer lemons I haven't noticed Mandarin orange flavors. Meyer lemons are much sweeter and less sour than normal lemons. I use them in recipes that strongly feature lemon fruit, not just juice. For example, shaker lemon pies are made with thin slices of whole lemons, including the peel. Regular lemons are overwhelming so I use Meyers. On the ...


7

Lemons are quite sour, while Meyer lemons are much sweeter and less acidic. If you substitute directly, it'll have a dramatic effect. For example, suppose you start out with a dessert made with lemons that has enough sugar added (or little enough lemon juice) to make it the right sweet/sour balance for you. If you replace the lemon with Meyer lemon, it'll ...


6

Try using lemon zest (lemon peel shavings) and lemon or lime juice. You might try sprinkling the zest over the top of the cookies right before you put them in if you don't get enough flavor from adding it to the batter


6

I have this recipe on my short list to try: http://smittenkitchen.com/2008/04/shaker-lemon-pie/ Few things I've noticed in her recipe and my own experience with pies containing whole lemons. The meyer lemons as she notes make a huge difference. Mind you their growing season is short and they are not available everywhere. If you have access to them, then ...


6

Capsaicin dissolves easily in oils (and alcohol). Steeping or gently heating chili peppers in oil will easily produce a spicy oil. You could use crushed red peppers but you might get more interesting flavors by using a fresh pepper. A single habanero would give you an interesting fruitiness and all the heat you could ever want. As for the lemon- Lemon ...


6

Use one teaspoon of dried zest for one tablespoon of fresh zest, which is about what you get from a lemon. Most foods dry to about a third their original size, so I would use one third of the amount called for. Lemons vary a great deal in size, but the recipe probably means one tablespoon of fresh zest, which is normal for "medium" sized lemons. Something ...


6

A Google search for "lemon zest machine" and "lemon zest machine commercial" found this and this. Both will surely zest faster than a hand zester, but probably will not zest better than a hand zester. The caveat of zesting a lot of fruit in house is that you will then have a lot of peeled fruit that you will also need to find a use for. This frequently ...


6

Cooking lemon juice longer won't make it "zestier." Like most foods added in small quantities as flavor enhancers, lemon juice has a lot of aromatics and flavor components that could boil off, break down, or get absorbed by your stew/soup with longer cooking. There's a reason why a fresh lemon or lime slice is often served beside a lot of foods (and drinks)...


6

Lemonade is of course all about balancing the sweet and the sour. It stands to reason that if you're trying to amp up the sweetness, you can either add more sugar (the opposite of the goal here) or reduce its opposite, the sour. Reducing both sugar and the acid is equivalent to diluting your lemonade, so one of the first things you could try is simply ...


5

After a quick Google search, I found chowhound topic that deals with this exact matter. They'll grate well and it's handy when (just semi-defrost them) you need some grated zest as you can just pull out a bag from the freezer and sprinlkle them into your recipe. They'll juice but you need to defrost them which I'm told is best done by 'zapping' them in the ...


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