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88

It would be dangerous to attempt to fry in lemon oil Lemon & other citrus oils are primarily (90+%) made up of Limonene, which has a "fire diamond" of 🟦2-🟥2-🟨0: 🟥 Flammable The red 2 indicates flammability: Must be moderately heated or exposed to relatively high ambient temperature before ignition can occur (e.g. diesel fuel, paper, ...


37

Ethylene, most likely. You've said that that lime was at the bottom of the bowl, mostly covered with other fruit. I'll bet it was very close to some kiwis. Fruit -- particularly fruit like kiwi which ripens after being picked -- produces and releases ethylene. Ethylene serves a key role in fruit ripening. This is why you're advised to keep bananas in a ...


36

Lemon essential oil is composed primarily of limonene. Limonene is a skin irritant at high concentration, so you wouldn't want to put it in your mouth. Limonene is also volatile enough to limit its use as a frying medium, and the vapor would cause severe lung irritation. It would perhaps make more sense to add a bit of lemon oil to your frying oil, but again,...


35

The white rind of the lemon is what causes the bitter flavour. To get simply the lemon flavour you just want the zest. Use a zester, microplane, or fine grater to scrape off only the yellow bit of the peel and nothing white and you'll get a lovely lemon flavour without the bitterness or sourness.


27

I'm culling a lot of information from one of my favorite cocktail books for this one. Yes, limes have a slightly higher acid content (on average) than lemons do - about 6% for limes, compared to 4.5% for lemons. More importantly for their flavor, lemons have about 2% total sugar, while limes have somewhere between 0.5% and 0.75%. Sugar/sweetness has quite ...


18

Lemon juice and lemon zest have a different taste. Lemon juice has obviously more water, is tart (adds fruitiness and freshness to the dish) and the aroma is not as intense as in the zest. If you bake a cake or cookies it's often more desirable to use lemon zest because it doesn't mess up the water-solids-ratio and what you often want is a rather sweet cake/...


17

Four additional options: Lemon oil - be sure to get one intended for cooking, not an essential oil Lemon extract - made from alcohol, lemon zest, and sometimes lemon oil; you can buy this or make it at home Dried lemon zest - available as a seasoning, check the spice section of your grocery store Frozen lemon zest - you make this yourself, just zest a lemon,...


17

I have used both citric acid (food grade, sold for canning and jam making, not the descaler) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in similar cases when only the acidity of a dish was insufficient. Sometimes lemons are just not sour enough. The powder comes in very fine texture and can even made finer with a mortar and pestle. A very small amount will go a long way ...


14

Yes, it is possible to make the curd more tart after the fact! I don’t know all the boundaries but this procedure worked for me with the specific recipe in the question: Add 1/2 tsp corn starch to the juice of 2 lemons in a small bowl and mix well. Over a double boiler, bring the finished curd back up to temperature while whisking occasionally. Add the ...


12

Essential oils are toxic in larger quantities. This is simply the first google hit. A few milliliters can seriously harm small children; there have been deaths from larger amounts given to little children by misguided parents. An adult will not die as quickly but a few milliliters more may require a visit to a doctor or hospital.


11

This is totally not a problem. This style of lemon preservation relies on fermentation. The salt is not intended to halt all fermentation- it just restricts it to the tasty kind. Fermented pickles are a common and traditional way to preserve food because the salt and acid and thriving tasty bacteria make a very inhospitable environment for bad bugs. The ...


9

Lemon juice adds both lemon flavor and sourness whereas the zest only adds the lemon flavor. There are instances in which you only want the freshness of the lemon flavor but not the sourness. One example would be when you are working with dairy. The acidity can curdle milk. You would use zest in this case.


9

Normally, acids will turn broccoli a dull grayish color, and I don't recommend adding the lemon juice until right before you serve. For one thing the lemon juice will lose its flavor when cooked. Acids affect many, many foods when cooked — some for good and some for bad, so you do need to be careful when you add it. For example, acids added to beans before ...


8

Use one teaspoon of dried zest for one tablespoon of fresh zest, which is about what you get from a lemon. Most foods dry to about a third their original size, so I would use one third of the amount called for. Lemons vary a great deal in size, but the recipe probably means one tablespoon of fresh zest, which is normal for "medium" sized lemons. Something ...


8

The original recipe is leavened with baking powder, which these days is a mixture of baking soda, an acid, and a special acid which activates at high temperatures. Lemon juice is strongly acidic, and will react with all the baking soda in the baking powder. This means you won't get as strong a leavening effect during baking. (Some people also feel that the ...


7

I use lemon zest in my tea while its steeping, then I strain it through a fine strainer. Gives you all the benefits and no curdling.


7

Lemonade is of course all about balancing the sweet and the sour. It stands to reason that if you're trying to amp up the sweetness, you can either add more sugar (the opposite of the goal here) or reduce its opposite, the sour. Reducing both sugar and the acid is equivalent to diluting your lemonade, so one of the first things you could try is simply ...


7

Lemons are quite sour, while Meyer lemons are much sweeter and less acidic. If you substitute directly, it'll have a dramatic effect. For example, suppose you start out with a dessert made with lemons that has enough sugar added (or little enough lemon juice) to make it the right sweet/sour balance for you. If you replace the lemon with Meyer lemon, it'll ...


6

A Google search for "lemon zest machine" and "lemon zest machine commercial" found this and this. Both will surely zest faster than a hand zester, but probably will not zest better than a hand zester. The caveat of zesting a lot of fruit in house is that you will then have a lot of peeled fruit that you will also need to find a use for. This frequently ...


6

Cooking lemon juice longer won't make it "zestier." Like most foods added in small quantities as flavor enhancers, lemon juice has a lot of aromatics and flavor components that could boil off, break down, or get absorbed by your stew/soup with longer cooking. There's a reason why a fresh lemon or lime slice is often served beside a lot of foods (and drinks)...


6

When I've used Meyer lemons I haven't noticed Mandarin orange flavors. Meyer lemons are much sweeter and less sour than normal lemons. I use them in recipes that strongly feature lemon fruit, not just juice. For example, shaker lemon pies are made with thin slices of whole lemons, including the peel. Regular lemons are overwhelming so I use Meyers. On the ...


6

As I understand it, you may be seeing some confusion between two very different processes. When making sauerkraut, you are fermenting cabbage in brine, and the fermentation gives sauerkraut its characteristics. I believe this means you need to have or introduce the right microbes, and give them time and space and the right environment to work, and prevent ...


6

In addition to the idea being unhealthy and a fire hazard (both properly discussed in the other answers), there is one more consideration: In order to fry something, the oil has to be way hotter than the boiling water temperature (e.g. 250-300 deg C) and still safely below the oil's own boiling point. Lemon oil will boil below 170 deg C and you don't have a ...


5

Lemon is used as a flavoring, not as a cooking liquid, it's not going to keep the fish moist. The secret of having moist fish is the same as having moist beef, chicken or any meat or poultry: don't overcook it. Cooking releases moisture from the flesh, so cooking it well is all about timing - getting it cooked enough to have the internal temperature and ...


5

The flavor of lemon zest is in the oils contained in the skin, the best way to extract them is to mechanically extract them, steeping in hot water isn't going to do much for you. First, grate the zest using the finest microplane grater you can get, the more surface are you have the better. Second, you need to crush and/or grind the zest to get the oils out....


5

The problem is that you likely cannot afford it. It is done by vacuum, so the machine (rotovap) will cost you about 10 000 dollars, or you can find a few Chinese noname suppliers for maybe 6 000. It is an amazing thing to play with in the kitchen, but it will cover the cost of buying supermarket lemons for several lifetimes. Any conventional ways of ...


5

The difference is the person doing the naming. Seriously, you seem to be looking for clear cut categories where none exist. If one of the same person calls three different things a "lemon bread", "lemon loaf" and "lemon cake", you can typically expect that the "bread" will be somewhat less sweeter, less aromatic and less fine than the "pound cake". This is ...


5

The question may be conflating two different things. First, let's be clear about what yogurt is: the word traditionally refers to a milk product produced by fermentation with some lactic acid bacteria strains. (The exact strains of bacteria may vary depending on the culture and method, though the word "yogurt" tends to be restricted to thermophilic ...


5

Lemon zest is one way to go for what you want. You can shave just the outer yellow part off with a sharp knife, or a sharp carrot grater will work. Something that might be even easier is to buy a bottle of lemon extract. $3.89 at Target. It has a longer shelf life than lemons and is not sour. I have never bought lemon extract but I have some orange ...


4

Here's what I do. Zest all your lemons, measure out 1 Tbl. at a time and put it into an ice cube tray. Add a little bit of either water or lemon juice and freeze. When frozen you can pop them out and store in a zip lock bag or a freezer safe container. When you need some zest just grab a cube and defrost. Hope this helps.


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