New answers tagged

0

I was just in a butcher shop/carnicería in Puerto Vallarta with a Mexican guide who was telling us the chicken in Mexico is dyed yellow. She said even having lived in the US and Canada for years, she would never buy undyed chicken at home because it just looks gross. We asked why they do this and neither she nor the elderly man who owned the butcher shop ...


1

I think it's based on which brand of chicken you've bought. In where I'm currently located, there are a number of brands of chicken (mostly the frozen ones) that the purchasers of restaurant strictly avoid. Maybe try buying another brand? One more thing, you haven't defrosted your chicken THEN refreezing it again right? Based from my experience, that's how ...


0

You got your method a bit convoluted. You don't weigh the water, you weigh the salt. Different brands of salt vary greatly in volume. 5 percent also sounds low to me. I would never go below 6 percent and then only for veggies. A meat brine should be better served at 8 percent salt per liter of water. That means 80 grams of salt per liter of water. Use fine ...


1

Are you buying fancy chicken meat? Free range chicken has a stronger animal taste than factory produced birds. Maybe the "raw" flavor is that? Fried chicken from a restaurant is no doubt cheap chicken and it will be bland, with less animal flavor than a bird that was out pecking up bugs. Free range chicken is also more expensive. Try cooking up ...


-1

Without knowing exactly what you're tasting I would recommend washing your chicken before cooking it. Rinsing in a colander can help with off flavors. Secondly do you temp your chicken? If the chicken isn't getting to 165 it isn't cooked which would be why it tastes raw


22

Pureed chicken and water is not a stable emulsion, no. There's nothing in there that binds the fat or suspends the meat particles. Most recipes for chicken soup do not call for pureeing the actual meat (they tend to have chunks of chicken in them), so you would normally not see split chicken soup. You could probably return it to its previous texture by ...


0

Of course you can broil chicken thighs after sous vide cooking to crisp the skin. About 5 minutes before the chicken is finished, heat the broiler to high and line a broiler safe baking sheet with aluminum foil. When the timer goes off, remove the chicken from the bag and transfer it directly to the broiler pan. Broil the chicken until the skin gets crispy ...


Top 50 recent answers are included