New answers tagged

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There’s a food processing trick, where producers use dextrin to keep the coating crisp for hours. You simply replace some of the flour (around 20%) in your recipe with dextrin and you’re good to go. As the other answer mentions, multiple layers also helps creating a thick barrier to slow down moisture seeping into the coating. You can use dextrin in both ...


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I am skeptical, but I have not tried this recipe. The chef, Justin Wu, claims that double dredging in a combination of wheat and rice flours allows him to keep his fried chicken crisp, even after refrigeration. It is intended to be served cold. He soaks in spiced buttermilk, then dredges in flour. The chicken is then refrigerated for an hour. Before ...


0

When you make your riceball, add a little sesame oil to keep the rice moist overnight, mix it through; shape the rice, and wrap it in plastic and put it in the fridge for the next day. When you reheat the riceball, wet a paper towel or a cotton towel, ring it out so it's damp, place it over your riceballs, and heat it in the microwave for 10-30 second ...


3

Unwrapping the chicken and leaving it uncovered in the refrigerator for a few hours should dry it out a lot. You may want to sponge out the cavity with a paper towel before doing this. If possible, support the chicken on a wire rack above a plate in the refrigerator, rather than placing it directly on the plate. Otherwise, put the chicken breast-down on the ...


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Cook in the centre of a 200c oven for 75 mins uncovered and cover with foil and rest for 20 mins.


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