New answers tagged

2

This basting method (cider vinegar and salt) was popular in the midsouth in the 60's. It does have a flavor similar to Carolina pork bbq sauce. Use a temperature of 400 to 450. Apply baste using cotton bbq mop (available on Amazon). It will usually take 30-45 minutes for split/half chicken. Tastes best if you baste each side twice.


2

I would not do that, it will be overcooked, even if it is just kept "warm" and adding liquid will not help if the chicken is dry. Do your cooking a day before and put it in the fridge and re-heat the day of the party.


1

Greg Blonder has the best information that I've found on the effects of brining and marinating. In fact, the "food myths" section of his website, has a lot of objective food science. There are several links that are pertinent to your questions. You can see here, that Blonder uses dye to illustrate the effect of brining. He concludes that brining is almost ...


2

If by “OK” you mean whether there are food safety issues the answer is no, pressure cookers are safe places to cook chicken. If by “OK” you mean “will it have the exact same texture and flavor and so forth,” the answer is that pressure cooking is more intimately related to boiling and stewing, and is a fast method of doing those sorts of high-moisture ...


2

You could try to cook the ckhicken as-is, but the result will not taste good at all. You could instead use the oven to make a chicken soup. Microvave ovens can heat/boil water if placed in thin-walled porcelain container, such as a bowl. Separate the chicken into pieces that fit a porcelain bowl, add water and chicken soup ingredients. Do not leave the ...


0

OK, you can do this. This is tough though. NEVER UNDER COOK CHICKEN. Under cooked chicken is both disgusting and dangerous. Overcooked chicken is just tough and disgusting, but not dangerous, The key is to NOT OVERCOOK THE CHICKEN, and NOT UNDER COOK CHICKEN. Its a tough balancing act, but if you experiment with your microwave and are patient you can ...


4

There's not going to be a good way to cook a "steak" (I assume you mean a chicken filet, or a single large-ish piece of chicken without bones), but you may be able to make do with something close. Microwaves do one particular kind of cooking well: steaming. Chicken doesn't taste great steamed, but it's not terrible, either. As long as you add some ...


19

By itself? Not really, the results will end up edible (i.e. fully cooked) but not very tasty (chewy, no searing/caramelization). However, there are dedicated "microwave grill" devices like the Microhearth Grill Pan (others might be better, google will help, this is just the one I have experience with) that you can put into your microwave oven. They convert ...


28

A microwave can cook a beef steak or piece of chicken to a safe temperature and make it edible, however the result is often tough and you won't get a crust of any kind on it. When you cook something on a pan or on a grill/broiler the outside is exposed to a high temperature, giving the outside a chance to go through chemical changes like Maillard reactions ...


57

Your chicken was a rooster and what you found are his testicles. If you are not queasy, this forum entry gives you a picture and some more anatomical details. While animal testicles are typically edible and often a speciality/delicacy, many westerners are not necessarily familiar with them, especially in animals as comparatively small as roosters. Asian (e....


3

I somehow think that there should be a duplicate somewhere but, as I haven't found it, I will venture an answer. The simple answer is that your chicken should be perfectly safe. While most fresh meat is sold with a 'sell by' date rather than an actual expiration date, in this case, it doesn't really matter. You bought the chicken around the 2nd of the ...


0

A key question is how long the item was frozen for. In general, freezing is considered to slow the aging clock nearly to a stop, but there are factors. Aging is not entirely stopped, but close. The act of freezing and thawing though does damage. Plant and animal cells are damaged by the expansion of water during freezing and the sharp ice crystals for ...


3

Traditional duck confit is made with duck fat, which would be a solid when cold. That will not work so well. So, the cured duck is placed in a crock, and warm duck fat is added to cover. This is then placed in the oven at a low temperature. After the cooking, the duck is left submerged to cool, and be stored in the fat. There is no splatter risk, because ...


0

My rule of thumb is to use room temperature vegetable oil. I add a lot of vegetables (onion and garlic mainly) and herbs in the bottom of the pot and the meat goes on top of it; this way, when the oil is heated and the water start to leave the food, it will remain in the bottom and the meat will still be in contact with the oil.


22

I believe you are referring to this article? https://www.seriouseats.com/2012/01/the-food-lab-how-to-make-best-buffalo-wings-fry-again-ultimate-crispy-deep-fried-buffalo-wings.html Funny enough, I was reading this yesterday. And if you go through the end, Kenji gives a very scientific explanation on how double-frying your wings can make them more crispy. ...


10

It does help, yes. The first frying acts to partially dehydrate the skin, while partially hydrolysing the collagen into gelatin. The second frying then completes the dehydration and "puffing up". If you didn't have the first frying, there would be less time for those effects before the food burned.


Top 50 recent answers are included