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There are a couple of easy steps you could take to ensure crispy skin: Let the chicken dry uncovered in the fridge overnight (or at least for a couple of hours). This desiccates the skin which will lead to much greater browning on the skin, and if you stuff the cavity with something that will let off steam during cooking, like lemon and herbs, this will not ...


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In my experience, its best to apply when chicken is almost done. I've learned from experience. Putting sauce on when you put chicken on the grill, will definitely burn even before the chicken is cooked.


2

It's impossible to answer this for sure, it depends on how fresh they were when they were frozen and other factors. If they were frozen quickly after you bought them and they were well within their sell by date they are probably still good. The easiest way to tell is to smell them, your nose is the best detector you have. If they smell bad get rid of them. ...


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From a food safety perspective, if the chicken is hot throughout after cooking, you're almost certainly good to go. Do make sure you cool down the chicken quickly enough to avoid spending too much time in the 'danger zone'. Especially if after re-frying, the chicken gets heated more ("with veg and seasoning"), there is a good chance you can follow the recipe ...


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After maybe 45 minutes to an hour, the chicken will be very soft and falling off the bones, the broth will have a strong but pleasant chicken flavor, and the lemons and vegetables will probably be completely depleted and disintegrated. This is usually a good start for home made chicken soup. At this point you'd probably strain it, let it cool, remove the ...


6

If you intend to cook the chicken at a full rolling boil (submerged in water at approximately 100 degrees Celsius), there are no safety concerns with this. Your chicken, particularly the breast meat, will almost certainly be overcooked, resulting in meat that is more 'dry' and stringy than many people consider ideal. If you are serving the chicken in the ...


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this post is 8 years old but it's one of the first that came up when I looked this up. so here's my input. high heat is only good for certain things, and meat isn't one of them. when you fry on high heat the outside burns, and the inside doesn't get nearly as cooked as the outside. so basically if you fry it on medium and just flip them whenever it's better. ...


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You should prepare the chicken livers by trimming away any fat, sinew, etc. You shouldn't need to rinse them, but it's OK to do so. Just be aware any time you are washing chicken or chicken parts that the bacteria can get all over your sink and kitchen, so I generally just confine to the cutting board and then wash it with warm, soapy water or put into ...


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I've been using this recipe using flaxseed meal stirred into water and allowed to sit for a few minutes. It becomes just a bit gooey and does an excellent job of holding the breading in place: https://allergen-free-cuisine.blogspot.com/2014/10/allergen-free-fried-chicken.html


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