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1

Even if you somehow took care of the safety issue that others have mentioned, for example by staying with it the entire time making sure there's always enough water in it, there's a practical issue that stems from this point (taken from Pieter's answer): Waste of energy, a water boiler is on or off, it will expend full energy keeping the water boiling. ...


2

I tried boiling the noodles with colored water and it didn't change the color at all. I made a corn starch slurry with cold water (approx 1/2 cup) and McCormick's Colors from Nature (red 2 tsp), which is just concentrated beet coloring. I mixed it into the drained, but hot pasta and came out with a nice pink color. I finished it with extra virgin olive ...


4

It depends on the nature of your electric water boiler. I assume you are using a kettle-like device, but I may be wrong. If this is the case, then your pasta will be sitting atop and within the metal coils. You risk burning and deforming the pasta with this approach. If you're in a bind and don't have access to a stove, I would recommend boiling water in ...


0

Salt your water heavily - probably more heavily than you've been doing. Don't rinse your pasta. Don't salt your sauces too heavily, because the pasta itself will be saltier. Don't put oil in the water - it doesn't do anything. But salt your water a bunch.


31

Advantages: You can make pasta in your water boiler. Disadvantages: Hard to clean. Waste of energy, a water boiler is on or off, it will expend full energy keeping the water boiling. Incredibly dangerous, a big fire hazard. Because it's modified to ignore the internal temperature sensor it will keep heating and heating even if all the water is vaporized. ...


11

Advantages: you free up one burner in your stovetop, and one pot Disadvantages: you might damage your equipment in the long term (starch might get in places where it shouldn't, and metallic parts will get damaged by the salt) you can't boil clean water in that boiler anymore (I doubt it will be easy to clean) if it doesn't have a temperature control, it ...


0

I only ever use the packaged sheets. I cook them in a frying pan, not a saucepan. Start with hot tap water, no salt or oil added. About 3/4 heat. After 5 minutes, I use an egg lifter and slide between the sheets. Stops them sticking together. After 10 minutes, remove from stove and left one sheet out at a time and place on paper to towel to absorb excess ...


0

When it comes to spaghetti and sauce, I am finicky. Three things must be true. The pasta noodles must be 'al-dente'. The meat sauce must be thick enough to stand a metal ladle up in. The two must never be mixed together until serving. My first priority: Pasta must be al-dente. The taste method is the only thing that determines proper cooking time. The ...


0

Yes. I have used regular, dry noodles right out of the box for lasagna. Use a lot of saucy meat sauce (cooked ground beef and Italian sausage). Remember, you need to put a base of sauce in the pan first before putting in your first layer of the noodles, followed by some of the ricotta mixture (ricotta, eggs, parsley, parmesean cheese,fresh basil) covering ...


1

My practically foolproof way to cook dried cheese tortellini: bring about 2 quarts of olive-oiled, salted, water to a boil. Stir in up to 1 lb of dried tortellini. (For me, 9 dry ounces was about 2 cups.) Put the lid on, and TURN OFF the heat. Set the timer for 20 minutes. The hot water cooks the pasta, rehydrates the cheese, and because it's not bouncing ...


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