Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

113

Yes, it's true that bananas are radioactive, however, the amount of radiation that you get from eating a banana is negligible. It's also true that eating too many bananas can kill you, but if you manage to eat enough bananas to get radiation poisoning, you're going to die from something else long before potassium exposure comes into the equation - like, say, ...


46

In addition to the answers explaining that bananas do contain radioactive potassium, but in small amounts, it's also worth noting that your body maintains a fixed amount of potassium through metabolism. So even if you somehow manage to consume 5 million bananas, your body won't actually be exposed to 5 million Banana equivalent doses of radiation.


35

Most of the weight in fresh fruit is water, which has no calories. When you dry the fruit, the remainder is concentrated, so there are more calories in a given volume or weight. Sulfur dioxide is a preservative with anti-microbial properties. The claim of 3.6 times the energy is specious.


22

While it's true that bananas are unusually radioactive (which actually means very slightly), you should keep in mind that all plants and animals are radioactive. For people, about half of our intrinsic radioactivity comes from the potassium in our bodies, and about half from the carbon-14 which we all carry around. As for safe quantities, that's pretty ...


21

You don't mention what variety of banana you have access to. There is a host of banana varieties and they all have different characteristics in regard to flavor and texture. I will assume that you are referring to the Cavendish variety that is ubiquitous in the west. Cavendish bananas, when ripe, are very fragile. They go mushy easily and oxidize ...


15

One thing to add to the answers above - as bananas ripen, the starch in the flesh is converted into sugar. This continues until the starch that was providing the firmness and structure for the banana has, for the most part, been converted to sugar, which is also partly why the insides continue to get mushier as the banana ripens. So more time converting ...


15

Cut it in half before peeling, so that only the end is exposed. Wrap the exposed end with plastic wrap, and place in the refrigerator. The skin may darken, but that is okay. You should get a day or two easily. Or put all the half bananas in the freezer, and when you have enough, make banana muffins.


13

I assume you are referring to standard, grocery store, cavendish bananas- They have a ton of water and sugar and have a very delicate texture. This makes them easily disintegrate and get gummy instead of crisp. The key is to deep fry them at a fairly high heat until they are dark and crisp. It also helps to use greener bananas that will hold together ...


13

Alright, I'll go ahead and post this as an answer. The fact of the matter is the Cavendish/dessert bananas should not be refrigerated. They will develop a sickly green/grey tinge to their skin. This does not really affect flavor, texture, or to the best of my knowledge, nutritional value, but it makes them look like ass. Now, to the crux of your issue: you ...


13

Store them in a well ventilated place. Cool (15 degrees Celsius) and dark will probably do them good too. And buy green bananas. Your bananas are alive. Seriously, they continue to live after they have been picked. Breathing, cell metabolism, hormone production, etc. goes on. You cannot stop this process, you can slow it a bit. In many plants, fridge ...


13

The skins turn black in the fridge, but the fruit itself is fine. Cooks Illustrated tested if refrigerating bananas keeps them good longer, and they found it does—five days longer. Extract below: Most people store bananas on the countertop, and we wondered if chilling the fruit could slow ripening. To find out, we left 12 pounds of bananas at room ...


12

You've partially answered your own question: When wrapped in foil, the water contained naturally in the ingredients will re-moisturise the banana bread. a. To reduce: don't wrap it leave it in the oven to cool down with the oven slightly open so that most of the moisture can escape b. to enhance: make a dome of tin foil above it before putting it in the ...


12

Yes, bananas are radioactive. They contain potassium, and a small part of this comes as a radioactive isotope 40K. The dose of an average banana is (rounded up) around 0.1 μSv. Other potassium-rich foods also naturally contain 40K, e.g. potatoes. There is absolutely nothing to worry about. Our natural environment and cosmic radiation means our bodies are ...


11

They do change color, just not so obviously as normal bananas. There's a slight greenish tint that disappears as they ripen, and the red becomes a bit deeper (some people say purplish). They also get softer - including the skin getting more tender, just like yellow banana skin. Just think about how bananas feel when ripe, feel your red bananas, and (perhaps ...


11

They are easier to mash (so that they incorporate more smoothly into the batter), sweeter (more starch has converted to sugar), and more aromatic when overripe. Still, you can get quite a good muffin or banana bread from fully ripe, but not overripe, bananas.


10

Apple juice will give you very little additional taste, but it will sweeten your smoothie. Especially filtered apple juice has a rather subtle flavor which is easily covered by other fruit flavors. Juice producers use this to make their juices cheaper - if a juice advertises 100% fruit, and a flavor from an expensive, non-juicy fruit like strawberries, it is ...


10

I've preserved cut fruit for at least 6 hours before using just lemon juice. Lemon juice inhibits the oxidation of the fruit which prevents browning as well of a loss of crispness. One lemon should be enough juice for a 1.5 quart bowl of cut fruit. Simply squeeze it over the fruit and toss gently to prevent bruising. Since you'll be working with apples, ...


10

You get mold (and less visibly, bacteria) growth after 4-5 days because your water (humidity) content left in the deyhdrated food is greater than 5%. Typically dried apples (and other types of fiberous dried fruit) have humidity levels closer to 20% when you don't dry them to a crisp. That means the treats you make aren't shelf stable, but luckily this can ...


10

I had an application not long ago for which I needed the answer to the question as written. America's Test Kitchen (sorry, paywalled) has a recipe for banana bread that I love. I save over-ripe banana chunks in the freezer until I feel like making banana bread. The recipe calls for "6 large very ripe bananas (about 2 1/4 pounds), peeled". My bananas were ...


9

Before peeling cut the banana in half using a knife. Then place the part you want to save back with the other bananas When you want to eat the saved half in a day or two, just cut off a 5 mm slice near the cut end and it will be as good as new You don't need to waste plastic, or to put it in the fridge


9

If the banana flower was astringent it is because of the flower, not the cooking method. When the flowers are large and young they taste a lot better. If you wait until the bananas are formed and the stem to the flower is long then it will be astringent. The best time to pick the flower is when the stem is 10cm or less from the banana bunch. If the flower ...


8

Turn the oven down by about 25-50F. Quite often, ovens just blast the heck out of baked good, especially smaller apartment ovens. Larger, more expensive ovens tend to be better calibrated and will produce the proper 350F temperature usually required for banana bread. A cheap oven, which is still fine for banana bread, will overshoot the temperature and kill ...


8

At the risk of heresy, I say when over-ripe is called for it is by the mistaken impression that the flavor is improved when it is only that it is sweeter, less starchy. Muffins will brown faster. I believe this myth grew out of the fact that recipes were created to use up what would otherwise go to waste: it then was inferred that over-ripe is ideal. My ...


8

Per the National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28, the "refuse" content of a banana is 36%, attributed to the peeling. https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2159?format=Full


8

It doesn't harm the apple, but it does speed up its ripening as well. And that risks over-ripening. So your perfectly crispy apples may begin to become mealy. Eventually they become targets for yeasts, molds, etc and start to rot. But it's not making them toxic or causing untoward chemical changes. They're all just speeding each other up. Yes, you can just ...


8

If you were to somehow actually take all that radioactivity into your body you would be dead long before the radioactivity became an issue. The radioactive element is potassium--and potassium chloride is used as an execution drug. In practice your body maintains potassium levels at the right amount (too little is also deadly), eating more bananas simply ...


7

Starch content and sweetness: Bananas become sweeter as they ripen because the starch is broken down. An unripe banana is full of complex carbohydrates, but as it ripens, these are broken down into simple sugars which is why riper bananas are sweeter. The lower starch content and higher sugar content also means that the banana is digested more quickly, so it ...


6

In my experience the red bananas become a bit warmer shade of red -almost orangey. If I see red bananas with a slight orange color instead of the green I buy them! Because I KNOW those are ripening. I have bought many red bananas that NEVER ripened - just stayed hard & went black. I've been told by produce managers that they've had to pull red bananas ...


6

With some precautions in your mixing method, you could substitute Bread Flour for AP Flour in Banana Bread. Mind you, it may make a stronger, more dense, more chewy banana bread than people expect--but it would still be pallatable, some may even prefer it. As discussion here points out: the main concern in the substitution is the higher gluten of bread ...


6

Most of the ingredients in this recipe are acidic. ph values: flour 5.5-6.5 brown sugar slightly acidic bananas 4.5-5.2 butter 6.1-6.4 The salt is neutral and the eggs are not acidic, ph 7.1-7.9 The combination of these ingredients is acidic enough to interact with the baking soda to leaven the bread. Even without the bananas, there would be some ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible