23

I agree with FuzzyChef's answer, though I'd emphasize in general that this is often a question as shape as well as volume. A cake that is increased in size but also baked in a wider pan so its overall thickness is about the same as the original may not need much additional cooking time at all, or the increase might be small. When one increases all ...


22

A basic flatbread can be made by mixing flour, a little oil (if possible) and just enough water to make it stick together. Salt is often added. No real kneading is needed, just mixing, but a little kneading helps. Then roll/pound/press flat and cook in a frying pan or on a hot stone. In Egypt I've seen something similar cooked on the side of an old ...


18

My cooking club, several years ago, obtained a worksheet from a commercial manufacturer of cake pans, which I've just republished (I can't name the company, but I can share the data). As you can see from the sheet, when making white cake, an increase in volume of 50% results in an increase in cooking time of about 5 minutes, provided that you are not ...


17

Cooking terminology is vague and has evolved to suit the avilable ingredients in various places at various times. This means that the categories are not clearly defined. Here are some examples to indicate the continuum between bread and cake. There's a whole range of unsweetened soda breads (note: most yeast bread isn't completely sugarless). Many ...


16

Your two requirements are somewhat at cross-purpose. The minimal ingredients for a fairly typical bread are flour and water, but then you need to have several days to weeks to establish a working starter. If you are willing to have a three-ingredients bread, then your best choice is a soda bread. You only need flour, water and baking powder. The time would ...


12

You've partially answered your own question: When wrapped in foil, the water contained naturally in the ingredients will re-moisturise the banana bread. a. To reduce: don't wrap it leave it in the oven to cool down with the oven slightly open so that most of the moisture can escape b. to enhance: make a dome of tin foil above it before putting it in the ...


11

There are many different types of classification, and you can't use classical classification for most things, especially when the concepts have been around for a long time, and spans multiple cultures. What often happens when two cultures have similar things is that to explain the concept more easily to their culture, a group will explain the concept in ...


7

What makes muffins soft is starch and fat. You have no fat at all in these "muffins", and very little flour when compared to the vegetables and proteins. Normal muffin proportions are 2:2:1:1 flour:liquid:egg:fat (per Ruhlmann). I guess you can add up to 2 parts filler (so as much vegetable as flour) before you get the result too terrible. In your mixture, ...


7

You can replace any of the three with applesauce, or all of them - with the caveat that it will change the taste and texture of the final product, with more difference from more substitution. You do not have to substitute all of them if you choose to substitute one of them - the substitutions would be independent of each other (other ingredient amounts stay ...


6

Most of the ingredients in this recipe are acidic. ph values: flour 5.5-6.5 brown sugar slightly acidic bananas 4.5-5.2 butter 6.1-6.4 The salt is neutral and the eggs are not acidic, ph 7.1-7.9 The combination of these ingredients is acidic enough to interact with the baking soda to leaven the bread. Even without the bananas, there would be some ...


6

Two things hold cornbread together: Egg and gluten. Gluten forms from the wheat flour interacting with the liquid. In general you don't want too much gluten or the bread will be tough and chewy instead of the characteristic tenderness of cornbread. The egg in your recipe is similar to other recipes that call for 1 egg and 2 cups of flour. The 1/2 cup of ...


5

Some muffins with very thick batter can be held for up to several days before being baked, but these are the exception, rather than the rule. However, quick breads, whether sliced loaves, whole loaves, or muffins, freeze extremely well. Muffins are especially easy to reheat in the microwave or a toaster oven, and can be an ideal way to have quick breads ...


5

In quick breads, as opposed to yeast raised breads, it gelatinized starch that creates the structure of the bread, and holds the leavening. However, according to my research, most spelt flour (which is in fact a variety of wheat) is whole grain flour, so the bran will interfere with structure development. My quick research indicates that spelt flour ...


4

Comparing this recipe to other zucchini bread recipes, and other muffins/quick breads, it seems to specify: Lower temperatures More overall moisture Shorter baking times than might be expected. I suggest you find and try a different recipe to try. It is very disturbing how casual it is with pan sizing and baking times--and it gave you no test to know ...


4

For starters, I'd give pressing the grated zucchini with paper towels a shot. You'd be surprised how much liquid you can get out of it.


4

In the type of recipe you reference, all of which are quick breads, the result is supposed to be tender, not chewy. Wheat flour has proteins in it, which if agitated in the presence of water, will combine to form a new protein, gluten, which is very chewy. Sometimes, this is desirable as in yeast raised bread, where the gluten forms the structure of the ...


4

It could require more time, thanks to extra zucchini. It's a good idea to drain your zucchini right after grating. Not completely, just some of that collects at the bottom of the bowl. That, and a regular loaf pan of zucchini bread can take up to 90 minutes.


4

I'm a big doughnut fan. I've watched a lot of Unique Sweets episodes and it seems that the shops with the best doughnuts usually use a standard brioche recipe as it is rich in flavour, but also yeast risen... Thus it gives you the perfect texture and flacvour. I wouldn't use ANY bread recipe that it measured in volume. Weight is far more accurate, ...


4

Yes, from the book Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking by Michael Ruhlman Quick Bread = 2 parts flour: 2 parts liquid: 1 part egg: 1 part butter...Recipes vary considerably on how much baking powder to use. I've found that a good working rule is one teaspoon per 4 ounces of flour (a scant cup), or 5 grams for every 110 grams of ...


4

The effect that adding flour or water after initial mixing will vary depending on what you are trying to build. Different techniques leverage different properties of flour, water, and fat and so will behave differently. The differences come down to fat and protein. I'm sure you know that wheat flour contains proteins (glutenin and gliadin) that, when mixed ...


4

Unless your oven is dramatically under powered, you should not need to adjust the bake time at all—and if it is so under powered, maybe because it is a counter top oven, you should only bake one loaf at a time. Put the loaves in the oven with at least a hand's width of distance or so, allowing the air to circulate between the loaves. Note that bread ...


3

Quick breads are not primarily defined by the richness or fat content of the dough, but by the leavening method: While “regular” bread uses yeast - and has a long resting time, quick breads use baking powder or soda - and are baked more or less immediately. (Although some recipes have some extra resting time.) While yeast has no problem with raising a dough ...


3

Up to the quantity you're considering the effect of adding ground peanuts is likely to be very minor. This may even be true up to around the quantity of the chopped nuts. The extra surface area of nut powder compared to chopped nuts may make a small difference, that's all. The only way to be sure is to try it. If it comes out a little on the dry side the ...


3

He's right. It likely would come out with a different consistency. That 1/3 cup of oil and maybe some egg would be partly absorbed by the peanut butter. That will affect the texture. For a first try: In a separate bowl I would reconstitute the 2 T of peanut butter with water (4 T in this case). For easier measuring 4 T = 1/4 cup. Add the reconstituted ...


3

Here's a few problems I see: Too many vegetables: You don't need to clean out your refrigerator to make muffins. Pick either a cup of carrots, or bananas, or mung beans, but not all three with one cup of each. Not enough gluten: You've got oats and millet contributing no gluten, and whole wheat flour contributing very little, then just 40g of all-purpose ...


3

I would wager, however, that you are doing two things wrong and if you stopped them, your scones would be as delicious as the biscuits I regularly serve. The most likely culprit is that your butter is too warm. You want that butter to be as icy cold as a witches heart. All the flaky and delicious is because that butter is going melt once the gluten is set ...


2

Unstrained yogurt has the exact same ratio of water/protein/fat as the milk that it was made from. The amount of sugar will be different as some of the sugar was converted to acid during the fermentation. This means that yogurt can be substituted 1 to 1 for milk, and sometimes other liquids, in baking. Know that the pH of the batter will be lower and if ...


2

Following the recipe exactly doesn't guarantee the same result. There are many ingredients that may vary from different type. From that recipe, these ingredients come to mind as ones that can add water and make it mushy: Butter has different ratio of fat and water The eggs and the lemons have different ammounts of liquid in function of their size Zucchinis ...


2

See: Additional Time Needed for Baking Two Loaves of Bread at same time? Banana bread and beer bread are the same in this aspect. Multiple loaves will not require a change in baking time if your oven has reasonable total heat output.


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