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Other than browning the chicken, starting it off on the stove gives the dark meat more of a head start before it goes in the oven, because dark meat has plenty of fat and is often better when "overcooked" compared to the breast. What temperature the thigh area reaches doesn't really matter, you just want to take the temperature of the breast near ...


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It is doubtful that the "temperature is penetrating"...whatever that even means in this case. The temperature ultimately has to be at least 165 F (74C) in the breast. Placing the chicken, on top of its wings, on its side, in a pan on the stove top is not going to speed that up all that much. Especially for the upside facing part. I could see ...


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Stuffing vegetables you intend to consume in the cavity of a chicken is generally a bad idea. By the time the vegetables are cooked, the chicken will be extremely overcooked. Moreover, since the vegetables have been in contact with raw chicken, all of them should reach a safe temperature for chicken (at least on the outside) before they're consumed. And ...


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The only way to know if your chicken is safe to eat is to measure its temperature. You should check the breast (165F/74C) and the thigh (can go higher than breast), ensuring your are measuring at the center and not touching bone. Stuffing is usually not a good idea, because it increases the cooking time, and will likely result in overcooked white meat or ...


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