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19

If you're doing it as a pot roast, the vegetables are mainly there to deliver flavour (unlike in a stew, where they're a major part of the dish). Sometimes they're eaten, sometimes discarded (which seems like a waste to me, so I would choose vegetables I'd want to eat). They take on a role similar to stock or a flavoured rub or oil when roasting in an oven. ...


17

I agree with Jay's answer that one of the reasons is because of keeping the skin crispy, but I don't agree about the difference with other types of poultry and have a bit more background info. The root difference between duck and other poultry is that duck is much fattier, and most of that fat is stored under the skin. If you don't do anything about the fat,...


14

To directly answer the question as it was originally posted before edit: why does everyone add vegetables to slow cooker pot roast To save time Longer answer: It is not necessary to cook vegetables with meat. The vegetables do add flavor (a flavor that many appreciate) but I don't feel that is the main reason. Many people add potatoes to the pot ...


10

There are a lot of variables here: Oven temperature: As you mention, this definitely can be plenty off, but honestly most newer ovens are all right and meat isn't the most sensitive thing to baking temperature. You'd probably have had other issue before if it were the cause here. Meat weight/shape: Bigger means longer cooking times. The weight is a good ...


9

Lemon, herbs, onions, and garlic too are all aromatics that infuse into the chicken as it cooks giving it a lovely flavor. It doesn't absorb the flavors enough to call it a lemon chicken, but gives the chicken some flavor depth and acts as an enhancement. Stuffing the chicken helps these flavors to infuse better into the meat than spreading them around. Salt ...


8

Some of you folks are just worry warts. Cook's Country / Cook's Illustrated has a very similar recipe called "French Chicken In A Pot" (but one that is much easier to do than Gary's). Cooking at 225-250 F (~ 110-120C) for 4-5 hours makes this the most awesome chicken my family has ever had. The first time I did it, I did probe breast and thigh to be sure ...


7

I routinely butterfly most poultry before roasting, not just duck. The biggest reason I have is the bird cooks faster and more evenly without the cavity. Since it cooks faster, there is less moisture loss. I also get the backbone to save for stock.


6

I think the Danish use the English style cutting and names not the US style, so direct translation is not really possible. The round is often just English "Roast Beef" The main part of the round we would call topside, which is Danish is Inderlår og klump (topside and rump) The top part we call Silverside is the "Culotte" (leg) There are other ...


6

Shoulder is a tough cut. I think you will probably find it a bit chewy if you've cooked it at 190ºC for 52 minutes. In future, preheat the oven to maximum, place the lamb in a roasting tin, cover the tin with foil, put the tin in the oven, then immediately turn the oven down to 150ºC, and leave it for 4 hours. After that time, take it out of the oven and let ...


6

It sounds like you are trying to maximize the amount of pan juices, sometimes referred to be the French word jus. Any piece of meat is only going to express so much jus; if you have potatoes or other absorbent vegetables in the roasting pan, they are going to absorb it and it won't be available for another purpose such as gravy. What you still will almost ...


6

Once the potatoes are overcooked, there is little you can do to give them structure again. Your best bet would be to re-purpose the dish, making them into potato pancakes, a home fry, or some other type of dish, depending on how much structure is left. In the future, you can minimize the chances of mushy breakdown by: Use a waxy potato (such as the US ...


6

It doesn't matter if it is covered or not. The inside of the slow cooker will be warm enough to cook the meat. Braising (not submerged) and simmering (submerged) are two methods which both can lead to good results. The "very chewy" result sounds like choosing the wrong type of meat for slow cooking. If it was a real roast, then this is the obvious problem. ...


6

That's actually just about perfect, since meat should rest before you slice it. Start the roast at 3. Cook it for 2 hours. Wrap it in aluminum foil. Put it in something to retain heat (a cooler, or even just a box with some towels). Drive 1 hour to your destination. The muscle fibers will re-absorb the moisture, making it perfectly juicy. Without resting, ...


5

I couldn't find a recipe I was comfortable online with as none of them seemed to be able to take into account a hunk of meat that size. In the end I cooked it for 220 C for 30 mins and then 170 C for 6 1/2 hours, rebasting it every hour with the overflow juices and straining off the (copious amount of) excess fat so it didn't deep fry itself. Result? ...


5

There is no simple, single answer to this question. It is a myth to think that you can plug the weight of a roast into a formula and get a time and temperature. You can roast at any temperature you prefer, from about 250 F to 450 F. The lower the temperature, the longer it will take to roast and the more even the doneness will be from center to edge; ...


5

We don't know from your question how long it was on low with the lid askew (we don't know your time zone) so it's hard to say for sure. But usually a small crack on the lid isn't going to really really drastically reduce the temperature. You're in a better position to tell than we are: If it was still bubbling and steamy inside, even with the lid offset, ...


5

Tasty and quite salty, YES, (the taste will be salt!) with need to water down are probably GROSS understatements. You gain nothing trying to save/reuse it. Discard it! It will have very little flavor besides salt and very few, if any nutrients.


4

Properly? You throw it in a pit with hard wood coals for at least 8 hours. Of course we don't refer to that as roasting. :) Oven roasting is easier. Turn the oven on to 250F or so. Put something flavorful on the roast. Stick in a probe thermometer and put it in the oven. Remove when the thermometer reads 150F. Let it rest for a few minutes before carving. ...


4

That's the largest chicken I've ever heard of. That said, 3 to 3.5 hours at 325℉ should be sufficient. Unfortunately time doesn't really matter when cooking chicken, but temperature. You should definitely be using a meat thermometer and cooking long enough for the breasts to reach 160℉ and the thighs 170℉. If you don't have a thermometer the next best ...


4

If a recipe asks for a boned piece of meat, this indeed means that the bone is removed. I think the easiest and cleanest way of doing this is just asking your butcher. As for doing it yourself, there a some videos available online, e.g. this one. Since your meat is a bit smaller, I would suggest to lower the temperature a bit (to 340F) and leave it in the ...


4

There's a number of different ways you can add flavouring to coffee. As previously suggested, you can add syrup to the beans or to the finished coffee but the problem with syrup generally is that whilst adding flavouring it also adds sweetness which some may not want. You could try adding hazlenut essence or oil to the pre-roasted beans and leave for a few ...


4

Chris I think you're going to struggle to make two distinctive dishes whilst essentially using the same ingredients for both of them - therein lies your problem. Do you have to use cranberries and chestnuts in both? There's many different types of vegetarian stuffings you might use that would compliment your nut roast rather than almost copy it. How ...


4

Putting ingredients inside as well as on the surface helps spread the flavors throughout the meat. They're also very moist so it helps the bird stay juicier. Plus, it adds to the aroma which, believe it or not, affects the flavor. All in all, it's an easy way to make your chicken more delicious!


4

Yes. What you can do is throw the potatoes in with the meat - anything above 85C will eventually cook the potatoes through. Then when you pull the meat out to rest, raise the oven temperature to say 190 - 200 C and possibly add a little fat. They won't take long to finish roasting to a nice golden brown.


4

Slow cooking and great crackling do not go hand in hand. Your best bet will be to remove the skin, score and salt it well, and grill/broil it separately. For the leg itself, low and slow is the way to go. How long depends on how long you've got, but 5 or 6 hours in a low oven will do the trick. Start off with the oven on as high as it will go, throw some ...


4

Leave it uncut, if you slice it now your slices will dry out more.


4

What I learnt from my neighbor: The most critical part also the most enjoyable part for the diners is to make the skin crispy. For this many factors should be taken into consideration (e.g. the type of oven you use, room temperature where the oven is, etc). But the trick for the skin to be crispy is how much the skin can become detached from the meat while ...


4

If it's too tough, keep cooking it. Some people use "tender" to describe a pot roast that is tender like a good steak, others want it to fall apart with no knife required. I regularly cook pot roast 8-12 hours. As log as you have it covered for most of the time (like in a crock pot or in the over covered with foil), it will keep getting more tender until it ...


4

You cannot get rid of the lime flavor, it's there to stay. Your best course of action is to try and balance the strong lime flavor with sweet and savory flavors, for instance shredding the roast onto a bed of chicory/endive leaves with a soy-honey dressing.


3

It's probably less to do with the amount of juices that came out of the rib roast and more to do with the extended caramelisation of those juices produced by overcooking. Those burnt, caramelised bits left in the bottom of the pan are full of flavour and it's probably that, that added so much more flavour to your gravy than you're used to. Just replicate it ...


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