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12

There is absolutely real truth to improper sous vide cooking and botulism. Clostridium botulinum is an anaerobic organism - it grows when there isn't oxygen - like in sous vide vacuums and canned goods. The risk is that sous vide cooks both without oxygen and at temperatures so close to the perfect repoduction rate for the organism. If you cook it a ...


12

Your best bet for preserving quality (and safety) is to re-seal the bag, then leave them in the fridge for a bit. You want them to thaw a little, so you can pry them apart. Its safe to re-freeze after this (as the meat never entered the danger zone, indeed it probably never got above ~30°F). There will be some quality loss from the partial thaw-freeze cycle. ...


11

Well, I can definitely point you in the right direction towards a Cook's Illustrated test of vacuum wine keepers. Unfortunately, I don't have a membership to their website, but this free portion of the article suggests that at least some of them do in fact work better than just replacing the cork. For our wine stopper test, we evaluated several methods of ...


10

I'm sorry that you're having problems with my book. I think the problem is that you're adding water to the pouch. In the recipe, step 4 asks you to: Vacuum-seal the broccoli, butter, and a pinch of salt and pepper in a large pouch so that the florets are in a single layer. This will crush the tops a bit, but it will be much easier to seal. Sorry again....


8

No. You can freeze items like that, and they will stay safe indefinitely in a fully functional freezer, but once you break the seal on the can, items like that are subject to same 2/4 hour shelf safety rules as any other cooked item. See: How do I know if food left at room temperature is still safe to eat?


5

Believe it or not, veggies just happen to contain a lot of air. Even under vacuum this is a fairly common occurrence when cooking veggies low temp. You can add oil or other liquid to the bag, it will help, but air pockets will still likely develop. I usually add weights to the bag or bleed the air out by lifting a corner of the bag and resealing by ...


5

The idea is to remove oxygen and moisture and get a good seal on the jar. The vacuum pulls the lid against the jar, forcing the gasket more tightly against the rim. Note that the seal won't be as good as with actual canning, though, where the gasket is also softened by heat, so it molds better to the rim. That may or may not actually help you out, though: ...


5

Bread gets dried out and stale through retrogradation which requires moisture. Your vacuum bags are not keeping the bread fresh because of the vacuum, they are keeping it fresh by providing a very tight seal that prevents the bread from absorbing moisture from the atmosphere. A larger vacuum box would provide the same protection from moisture but it might ...


4

I think you are going down the wrong route. Compressing fruit will intensify the flavor of the fruit and change the texture, but that's not really what you're trying to do. You want to get the fruit to absorb your alcohol and additional flavors. Vacuum can work well for this, but not compression. When you create the vacuum, all the air comes out of the ...


4

Vacuum is quite commonly used in the industry to expel air. When you apply vacuum what you are actually doing is reducing the atmospheric pressure on liquid and soft porous material. A liquid will actually boil; meat will expand. It is like sending them in outer space. This expansion will create empty spaces down to molecular level. When vacuum is slowly ...


4

I have a small bucket of beef jerky in a Best Value Vac's system sitting at 25.5 Hg on the dial for several minutes. I allow air slowly back into the chamber and watch the marinade level slowly lower 1/4 to 3/8 inches as the chamber gets back to normal air pressure. I can surmise from this observation that the meat expands under the vacuum and contracts ...


4

I don't think there is any physical principle that forces marinade into a meat under a vacuum by itself. Putting it under pressure, not vacuum, could have this effect. The vacuum removes air and some liquid from the meat. THEN, when you release the vacuum, the marinade liquid can flow by surface tension into the meat. Repeat the cycle several times and you ...


4

You can use waxed baking paper between the steaks, It will make them easily separable but without retaining air bubbles.


4

I think vacuum sealed raw chicken breasts in the fridge behave like not-vacuum-sealed chicken breast in the fridge because the meat is neither sterile nor less contaminated with bacteria than the non-vacuumed meat and there are surely bacteria that grow under anaerobic conditions. The meat will be safe for 2 days.


4

Vacuum-packing elongates food storage times because by removing the air you remove the oxygen, which aerobic organisms (in this case bacteria) thrive on. No oxygen means no bacterial growth. This is also known as Reduced Oxygen Packaging and can extend freezer life by years. Some things to keep in mind: If you open the package, it's life will drop ...


3

They may be safe but they are certainly not guaranteed to be safe. see How long can I store a food in the pantry, refrigerator, or freezer. Besides safety they have likely lost all consistency and won't taste well. You're propensity to prevent food waste is admirable, in this case however, it's best to bin them or better yet, compost them in a flowerpot (if ...


3

No, there's no risk. Cheese has too much salt and acidity to harbor botulism even at room temperature; there's practically no chance of it growing in the refrigerator even with low-acid food, and literally zero chance of it growing in the freezer on any food. I don't think data is publicly available on individual botulism cases in the U.S. or worldwide, but ...


3

I have seen a website of somebody who tried to infuse various fruits in high vacuum, as well as some meat. I could not find the link, but I remember the conclusion was that this method works well for food which originally had air in it and hardly works at all for food which did not have any air inside. So it was great with apples, where it also changed the ...


3

I tried to read a lot about the vacuum marination and was a bit surprised that there are so many different theories out there. One thing that really surprised me is that people talk about marinating in vacuum BAGS. If you use bags the main effect is to get the air out. After sealing the bag there is no pressure difference inside and outside the bag, the ...


3

I would recommend adding the savory back to your dishes that sous vide cannot impart upon your food. Depending on the course, you could broil, braise, torch, add MSG, etc. Don't forget that salt = flavor, too! The method you use to bag your meats bears little difference in the amount of flavor added (see other FoodSaver vs zip-lock arguments). The ...


3

Mozzarella needs to be refrigerated, outside the fridge it has a limited shelf life, see our generic question: How do I know if food left at room temperature is still safe to eat? So shipping without some means of cooling will result in an unsafe product, look into shipping methods for perishable products. Your local mail or parcel carrier should be able to ...


3

No, it would not be safe to do so. You can divide it up and freeze it. That is the best and safest method. I would not, for the sake of safety and not making someone sick or worse, re-can anything without being an experienced canner. And even if you were an experienced canner, the time and cost involved would completely evaporate the amount of savings you ...


3

I wonder whether something was lost in translation, as @Echerwal points out and also suggests that your packet may be yeast. From a Tibetan friend in the US, here's how he makes dru-chhaang, the barley wine. Briefly wash the barley before putting it in a large pot and adding twice the volume of water as you have barley. Simmer until the water is absorbed, ...


3

Yes, it can both spoil and be unhealthy, even deadly. The micro organisms and toxins they can produce were there before you put it the bag and vacuum sealed it to cook it sous vide. If the temperature you cooked it at was not high enough to kill the micro organisms and destroy their toxins, they are still there. Just vacuum packing it a second time then ...


3

If you're doing a one step cook in the slow cooker, you can freeze everything together. If you want to brown any ingredients first you'll need to keep them separate. I do tend to, so I'd have a bag for any meat, a bag for veg that wants browning or softening (onions, carrots, pepperd etc.) and a bag or other container for the liquid part, with any veg that ...


2

I am a serious steak eater and always on the lookout for better ways to get the ultimate steak. To this end I just purchased a sous vide machine and after a few attempts with quality prime cuts I sadly have to agree, the results lack taste when compared to properly skilleted / broiled steak with butter. Sous vide steak simply taste bland and I also find the ...


2

I don't know that it's any less bulky, but this one is dedicated to canning Vacucanner. It does several cans at a time. Here's a review If you like DIY projects, you might be interested in this video. DIY Vacuum Canner


2

Marination, contrary to popular wisdom, is a surface treatment. Meats are simply not that porous; the only molecule small enough to penetrate more than a millimeter or two beneath the surface is salt, which diffuses at a rate of about 2 cm per 24 hours. So I would choose the route of convenience: do you want the marinade in the bag as you are going ...


2

Truffles are a low acid food, and they grow underground, so they are at risk to have botulism spores present. Vacuum packing creates a low oxygen environment, which is what the botulism bacteria requires to grow and produce its toxin. Unless the truffles have been salted (to 5% by weight), acidified (to a pH of 4.6 or lower), or frozen (at all times ...


2

The other solution for something like meatballs, sausage, etc. is to freeze them first and then vacuum seal them once they are nice and solid. At that point they will maintain their shape during the sealing process and can be easily separated when you need to open the package and defrost some. Once you open the bag and take some out you should be able to re-...


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