Hot answers tagged

51

You'll sometimes hear television cooking show hosts describe what they're doing as "cooking out" the paste. What they're actually doing is altering the flavor of the chili itself, not manipulating the level of capsaicin that was introduced. If you take a typical chili paste which has been combined with garlic and other things and then saute it in a fat, you ...


28

To take one concern away - practically none of the worm-looking parasites in food are dangerous. They are yucky, but harmless, even nutritious. But as far as I can see it from the picture, these are not worms at all. Beans and related plants have an embryo in their seeds. In white legumes, the embryo is a light pink color and looks indeed like a larva. The ...


24

Sorting means a few things: Remove foreign objects like small stones, other seeds, twigs.... that may have accidentally been packed with the beans. Remove damaged (think insect damage, for example) or otherwise shrivelled, infected or moldy beans and loose skins. Hint: Hollow beans and skins float up. Double-check for bug infections. Sometimes there are ...


22

Most beans can be soaked and cooked together with two exceptions. The beans should obviously have similar cooking times. For example I wouldn't cook chickpeas with other, harder beans because the chickpeas would be mush. Most varieties do have similar cooking times so this isn't often a problem. Second, black beans shouldn't be soaked with any other beans ...


20

Summary: Baking soda is mostly used to soften the beans faster and decrease cooking time by increasing pH. In some scenarios, it has been shown to aid in breaking down gas-causing sugars as well. Higher concentrations of baking soda and/or pressure cooking may be needed to make this latter effect significant. In most cases, an increased soaking time will ...


20

Assuming the can was canned properly and has not been damaged, the contents are effectively sterile, because the food is boiled in the can after it's sealed. There might be some degradation in texture and taste, but in terms of food safety, they are effectively safe. Note that the date on your tin is given as Best Before, not Use By. That generally means it'...


19

Soaking beans will not soften them. If done for a very long time (i.e., days), some beans will eventually begin to sprout or ferment, at which point they will become softer. But that is generally not desirable for basic cooking. Instead, you'll need to cook the beans to get them to soften. Bring to a slow boil and then simmer until the interior is the ...


17

If you want to reduce total preparation time, you can skip the soak. Then you can just boil for about 4-6 hours, instead of soaking overnight. This is not a tradeoff most cooks are willing to make, since it wastes quite a bit of energy, and reduces the taste qualities of the prepared beans somewhat. If you want it even faster, as weets mentioned, pressure ...


16

Lard is the fat of choice in many "el cheapo" canned refried beans, and could be what you are missing.


16

Though people seem to consider them 'the same thing' they are actually not. There is a 'red bean' distinct from a kidney bean. What you have there, though, are kidney beans. I found a couple of sources of comparison. The first, in text, from an actual bean company, Randall, which I thought gave it some added authority. Kidney Beans Of the three [they were ...


15

These are fava beans, the term "foul" (uncommon transliteration) on the pack hinting at a dish that these beans are typically used for: A ful, a stew-like dish of cooked and spiced beans from the Middle East.


14

Summary: Don't toss the soak water. First, to address the food safety issue, phytohaemagglutinin is gradually destroyed by temperatures above 175F or so. The FDA has referenced studies (see pp. 254-256) which show that 10 minutes of boiling will completely destroy any of that toxin in beans, though they recommend 30 minutes at boiling temperatures to be on ...


14

Welcome. According to the excerpt below from this page , kidney beans are an acceptable substitute. azuki bean = adzuki bean = Tiensin red bean = aduki bean = asuki bean = field pea = red Oriental bean = feijao bean = red chori Equivalents: 1 cup dried yields 3 cups cooked beans Pronunciation: a-ZOO-kee Notes: The Japanese use these small red ...


13

The foam happens because legumes are rich in saponines (see my longer answer here). It contains nothing more and nothing less than the water in which you boil the beans, it just happens to trap air bubbles because of its physical properties. There are no specific culinary reasons for or against keeping the foam. If it is in the way, you can remove it, but ...


12

The effect in question is caused by the high content of oligosaccharides--short sugar chain molecules--in beans. Humans lack the enzyme to digest these, and so they reach the large intestine intact, where resident bacteria eat them producing gas. Therefore, there are two ways to mitigate the effect: Remove the ogilosaccharides Provide the enzyme This ...


12

According to this extensive bean cooking guide from University of Alaska Fairbanks, the secret is to simmer the beans gently. Unfortunately, they have little more to say on the matter. Kenji Lopez-Alt, in his column on Food Myths at Serious Eats says (emphasis added): Most of us have been told at some point in our culinary careers that salting beans ...


12

The interior of modern cans are a heat resistant plastic (remember they pressure cook the cans at the factory), and will be fine for heating liquid things Just don't try using it to fry stuff!


12

As the question you linked to says, canned beans are cooked thoroughly, so there's no issue. Pretty much the point of canned food is that it's ready to eat; if something required further cooking it would absolutely say on the label. (And given that people eat canned kidney beans without thorough extra cooking all the time, including in salads, clearly they'...


10

I have read all the suggestions and have decided that there is no "One size fits all" answer...just common sense. If you are concerned about sodium/sugar -Rinse. If the liquid turns you off - Drain/Rinse. If you are putting them in a salad or dry dish - Rinse/Drain. When using canned beans in Chili, Soup, or any dish requiring liquid - Draining/Rinsing ...


10

You probably want to just use already-cooked beans, from a can. (Hope there's a store nearby.) Then you just have to cook as long as it takes to let the flavors mingle; half an hour is plenty. If you happen to have a pressure cooker, you can cook dried beans much faster, something like 20-30 minutes. See for example this recipe - you can add back in ...


10

My first guess would be: more salt than you think. This is probably the main "secret" for most processed foods. Ortega Traditional Refried Beans have 560 mg of sodium per serving (that's a serving of 131 g, making 3.5 servings in a standard can). A 1/4 tsp of table salt has 590 mg. If you're making the equivalent of 1 can of beans, you would have to put ...


10

From long cooking, the capsaicin could distribute throughout the food in a way that will make it more palatable, but the capsaicin content will not drastically change. If this does not suffice: In a curry dish, heat is best made more palatable by mixing in an emulsified, fatty, rich component like coconut milk, cream, yoghurt (mind the proper technique here ...


9

It may be the case that soaking beans without salt has negligible effect. However, Cook's Illustrated has found that soaking the beans in a brine solution has a significant benefit to the beans, and all of their recent recipes using dried beans call for this step. Here's what they have to say: Brining isn’t just for meat. When you soak dried beans in ...


9

I have noticed the same thing that the OP asked about. I opened one of my soaking beans, and looked up some drawings; this is most likely part of the bean, not worms. The reason could be that the manufacturers harvested these beans a bit late, and the beans have started to sprout, similar to how potatoes behave after an extended duration.


9

In fact, although the risk is low, the Penn State Extension does recommend soaking in the refrigerator, or using the quick soak method as opposed to an overnight room temperature soak: To be on the safe side, it would be advisable to use the quick soak method: Bring water and beans to a boil, cover and boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand 1 ...


9

It is normal for store bought canned beans to have a cloudy liquid. This applies to previously dried, starchy beans such as cannellini, kidney, etc. The water will get cloudy also when you cook dried beans. For others like green string beans or wax beans you would expect to see a clear liquid.


9

This is totally safe to eat as long as you cook them. The taste and the texture would be a little bit different than what you use to though. Here is an article about the safety of eating sprouted beans.


8

The USDA guidelines for canning dried peas or beans (or here) gives the rule of thumb that 12 ounces of dried peas/beans produces 1 quart (32 fluid ounces) of canned product. That's a ratio of 3 oz dry per 8 fl oz cooked. They don't specifically mention chickpeas in the document, but the same ratio appears in other places, here for example. At that ratio, 7....


8

I have just cooked 290 grams of dried chickpeas which filled 1 cup, in a pressure cooker. After cooking the drained weight was 616 grams or 2.12 times the dry weight. The volume was 3.75 cups or 3.75 the dried volume


8

I'm pretty sure that's fava beans. It's usually transliterated as ful, but seems close enough. See for example ful medames - the first word in Arabic on your package is the same as the first one there. They also certainly look like fava beans, though it's a little hard to see clearly in that photo. See the Google image search results for fava beans.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible