12

A stone is the hardest way to sharpen a knife. If you don't get the angle exactly right, you'll just be messing up your knife, not sharpening it. If you do want to go that way, yes, you'd definitely want to practice on something cheaper, because it's likely you will mess it up. This is why a lot of people just take their expensive knives to a professional to ...


11

These are just mineral (calcium) stains from your water source. They will not affect the stainless steel. The quickest way to clean stainless steel from burnt on oil, food, and water stains is to use a polyprop/ester scouring pad (e.g. 3M's branded as Scotch-Brite). Use a little liquid dish wash soap, a poly scourer pad, and a generous serve of elbow ...


9

Toxic? Neither the seasoning (which is essentially polymerized fat) nor the rust (which is... rust) is harmful in small quantities. Of course, I would not eat either by the spoonful. Spray oil as seasoning fat? See the many questions on seasoning, but cooking spray is far from ideal as a seasoning fat, as it contains emulsifiers and such, and tends to be ...


9

It should be fine to use. It is probably dusty, perhaps greasy from other kitchen sources. If it's self cleaning, go for it (and avoid using any harsh cleaners) It might get smoky at first, so you should have ventilation possible (window, fan, or whatever) If not self cleaning, give it a good wiping-out with an ammonia based cleaner or use commercial oven ...


8

The care of bamboo cutting boards is extremely similar to that of traditional wood cutting boards: Prime them with mineral oil, and refresh it every month or so. (Wipe with oil, let sit for a while, perhaps 15-20 minutes, wipe off). Wash only with mild soap, and rinse and dry immediately. (Wipe off and let air dry.) Don't put in a dishwasher. If using for ...


7

Great question - very well put! Your chef advice is sound. I have been cooking with cast iron skillets for longer than I care to admit (old guy) and at first they can be intimidating but in the end, they become your go to pan especially for searing/cooking hot. You asked the same question several times, "is the residue safe?" It's as safe as the cooking ...


7

Woodworker and cook here. Here's something that might work (without having seen the actual problem). You'll need some 220, 320 & 400 sandpaper, alcohol and shellac (which is food safe). Create a small amount of thinned shellac by mixing it with the alcohol. Next use the alcohol to raise the grain in the affected area. It'll create little nibs that'll ...


6

If you made the investment as I did for a professional diamond wheel electric knife sharpener as you saw the chef point out in the video above, I can tell you that this will indeed sharpen ceramic knives. I was reluctant to try this and possibly damage the sharpener, but I was otherwise going to toss out this "starter" ceramic cooks knife. I was also ...


6

You can definitely sharpen a ceramic blade and do it by yourself. But due to the fact that the ceramic is super hard material you'll need more patience than with steel. Get a DMT or Lansky sharpening guide and diamond stones. You can use the diamond stones on either type of knife and the guides will keep you at the correct angle on both side of the blade. ...


6

This happens a lot when the knives are more carbon steel vs. stainless steel. I have many Japanese knives, and this happens when I don't immediately wipe off the blade after washing, or when cutting up more acidic foods, and not wiping the knife off with a damp towel. I use a Japanese rust eraser, and most if not all rust will come off, and it will not ...


6

Although they don't get as hot as the interior of the oven oven hinges are exposed to a significant amount of heat, so you should pick a lubricant which isn't going to burst into flames when exposed to heat, dry out, or gum up. My usual go-to oil for the home is 3 in 1 oil, but I wouldn't use it here because of the heat. 3 in 1 make a high performance spray ...


6

I presumed the door just blew open rather got blown off and you were referring to the glass that held the mixture rather than the glass window in the door. I am unsure where the soap fits into your cleaning attempt. With those caveats, unless there is more you have not said, I do not think it was as drastic an event as it appeared. Before I address your ...


6

Are you SURE they were advertised as dishwasher safe? If so, contact the manufacturer because they were lying. It is, in fact, the bare metal you're looking at— those pans are made from aluminum which was anodized: an electrochemical process which changes the appearance of the metal. All aluminum pans including anodized ones that are not painted or otherwise ...


5

It won't suffer much from having a millimeter or two of material removed in one area, so I'd just go ahead with the Dremel and grind it down to clean stone rather than resorting to chemicals that may or may not work and may or may not impregnate the stone. There's no substance made short of diamonds that can resist a grinding wheel. Worst case is you end ...


5

Of course stainless utensils can be used on stainless pots and pans; otherwise, the restaurant industry would come to halt. The only time you need to use utensils of specific materials is pans with a non-stick coating that can be scratched, such as using plastic for PTFE. As to your alleged "metallic leaching," that is not typical at all to stainless steel ...


5

As I am sure you can tell by looking at it, your Japanese knife is primarily sharpened only on one side. As a result, the cutting edge is angled more steeply. Japaneseknives on Wordpress has some simple pictures illustrating this. This asymmetry is why you can't reliably use a honing rod on it, which relies on swipes to both sides of the edge to keep the ...


4

The manufacturers will tell you: During decalcification with decalcifiers on citric acid basis, residue can form and clog the fine lines and valves of your espresso machine. Lime deposits can become sealed under an unremovable layer of residue formed by the citric acid. A similar reason goes for vinegar. And Citric acid (from what I'm told) is ...


4

Silkscreening ink is made to withstand scratching. So I wouldn't go the dremel route. The first I would try to do is to transfer it again somewhere else, to something more porous/sticky than the pizza stone. The best thing would probably be blotting paper, if you can get it, but if not, try other types of non-glossy paper. Heat the stone again, then put ...


4

If your experience is anything like mine the pizza stone won't survive long enough to bother maintaining it. Maybe I need to find a thicker stone, but the three we've bought so far have all cracked through normal (even light) use. That said, if your pizza stone is worth the effort, I'd recommend a "burn it off" approach vs an orbital sander.


4

While it is impossible to prove a negative, I am unable to locate any credible evidence that there is actual danger from glue in bamboo cutting boards. Consider that even if (and this seems unlikely) there were formaldehyde in the glue in a cutting board that in order to pose a danger it would have to: Not be bound permanently or chemically modified as the ...


4

I bought coconut oil just for my bamboo cutting boards. I am not going to use a petroleum product like mineral oil for all kinds of reasons. I can't use any dish soaps so I did research on cleaning. I want my dishes to be at least as clean as ones washed with dish soap. I learned that it is not the product used, it is the rubbing motion that does the ...


4

Letting it cool slowly will minimize the chance of warping for thin or cheap cookware. Quality cookware should stand up to being deglazed or quickly cooled under running water. How you cool it is up to you. Note: the above is based on metal pots and pans. Glass, ceramic, or earthenware pans should always be cooled slowly to prevent heat-stress breaking ...


4

Hi Leigh Anne and welcome to Seasoned Advice! First let me say that you will probably get a few different answers as many of us have different ways of handling such issues. Since you had what sounded like a pretty good amount of rust to start with, I would recommend a thorough cleaning with steel wool to ensure that you have removed all of the rust. Be sure ...


4

Mystery solved! At Catija's prompting, I managed to dig up the cutter on the website of the shop I bought it from, the Chef's Hat in Melbourne, Australia: CUTTER PIZZA W/ALUM HANDLE 95MM S/ST ($6.60) So turns out the handle is aluminum (aluminium), which can be discolored black if the alloy is not dishwasher-safe, which this clearly wasn't. Time to ask a ...


4

This will be from an electrochemical reaction between the can (mostly iron I think) and the water and possibly the aluminum (a better chemist than me would be able to tell you). Aluminum has a fairly impermeable mono-molecular oxide layer on its surface (incidentally this is why you can color coke cans and the like; the color is in the oxide layer). The ...


3

Do you have a BBQ? Place the pizza stone in there (latex-side down), close the lid, and turn it up to full blast (toss some foil-wrapped potatoes or something there while you're at it). An episode of Pitmasters later, and you'll likely have burned off most of the residue without risk of melting it further into the surface. Don't open it until completely ...


3

You actually can sharpen a ceramic knife with a diamond wheel sharpener. There's 2 sharpeners that can sharpen ceramic knives. Kyocera has a battery powered one (DS50) http://www.amazon.com/Kyocerca-DS-50-Electric-Diamond-Sharpener/dp/B002R90N7W But based on the reviews it's designed mainly for Kyocera knives, and it's battery powered so it doesn't ...


3

We use kosher salt to clean (still-warm) cast-iron by pouring in a handful then rubbing around with a (usually paper) towel. The kosher salt grain size is just right to be an abrasive for removing excess grease and other food particles, and you don't have to worry about it melting. Then a wash with hot water and a little soap to complete the washing, ...


3

I realize that this is an older post, but from the photo posted, these don't look like scratches at all. Instead, the marks look very much like the marks you would see on a ceramic sharpening rod. Because ceramic is usually much harder than the mild steel used in your average metal spatula, your ceramic coating is actually putting scratches in your spatula ...


3

Mix 3 parts coconut oil with one part beeswax and melt together - that's it. The beeswax 'hardens' the coconut oil and gives a better, more water-resistant finish. Wipe it on, leave it half an hour, wipe it off. Good for your hands, too ;)


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