33

You need to realize that oil doesn't splatter, water does. In fact, you could heat oil until it catches fire without any mayor movement. But the moment water reaches the oil, which in a hot pan is way beyond the boiling point for water, it will instantly turn into steam, expand and pull oil drops with it. So apart from lowering the heat - which is not what ...


23

Lining with foil works well with cooking methods like baking or broiling, where the food is not stirred or manipulated much, and so the foil can sit undisturbed. With stir frying, you are quite likely to break through the foil while doing the stirring, and have to clean up fully in any case. Also, you probably would not get as good a stir fry due the thin ...


21

I am afraid Chef Flambe's answer is wrong. Not everything has a melting point and a boiling point. Oil is made of big organic molecules, containing long carbon chains*. Unlike anorganic substances with small molecules (like water), heating oil does not lead to a point where the molecules stop attracting each other (that would be the boiling point). Instead,...


15

This is how I cook bacon, and also produce almost perfectly flat bacon. No special tools required (Well, I'm assuming most people have the following in their kitchen). Tools Sheet Tray Cooling Rack (slightly smaller than the sheet tray) parchment paper (Optional, but makes for easier cleanup). BACON (I like the extra-thick cut). Steps Take the sheet tray ...


13

In Scandinavia we have this thing: The "lid" is a thin wire mesh that allows steam to escape and keeps most of the oil in. I have no idea what it is called in english :-)


11

This is specifically the reason for the invention of Bacon Presses


10

The way I have achieved this is by gently simmering the potato cubes until they soften. (You want them pretty much cooked, but not so done that they won't hold together well.) I also lightly salt the water so they take on a little seasoning while they cook. This, of course, is optional. Next, I drain the potatoes very well. I want them to essentially be ...


9

Crepes were made long before teflon was invented. I use a quality steel pan and non stick spray. I reapply the spray every 3rd or 4th crepe to avoid sticking. Everything else is temperature control. If your temps are too high then the crepes will toast and burn before they set on top. If the temp is too low then they are more prone to sticking. It takes ...


9

Honey will caramelize and burn before the chicken is fully cooked. It would be better to bake or roast the chicken in the oven at an even temperature, if you've marinated it prior to. Covered in foil at first and then finished off uncovered to add a little colour. If you prefer to cook it in the pan, then adding the honey should be your last step. Turn off ...


9

If the veggies are barely submerged, you're effectively steaming. It is not as pure a method as actually raising them slightly above the (I presume very rapidly boiling) water, but if you keep them moving enough, the result is going to be more similar than it would be to be boiling/poaching/simmering. In case you are unaware, you can get very inexpensive ...


9

Short answer: No, you cannot season enameled cast iron cookware. Enamel does not take seasoning in the same sense as cast iron or carbon steel. I don't know if seasoning would *hurt" the pan, but I've never heard of anyone seasoning their enamel cookware. So if you do try it though, let us know how it goes. If you’re gonna season, just buy cast iron and ...


8

Are you sure that the "non-stick" properties of your square pan are still OK. The pan in the picture looks pretty tired. I also note that the pan in the "successful video" has a ridged bottom. This gives more surface area to the bottom of the pan and gets more heat up into the egg mixture to cook it.


8

No. Neither plain stainless steel nor non-stick pans (which yours is as it's coated with Teflon) need to be seasoned. Not only is seasoning unnecessary, but it will only cause your pan to look dirty. It would do no good at all. Seasoning is all about preventing rust and sealing "pores", making the surface more resistant to sticking. Neither of those things ...


8

If anything is leeching, it would be stuff leeching onto your frying pan, not the other way around. It looks like the spots on the inside bottom of your pan are hard water deposits, maybe combined with residue from food cooked in the pan. Yes, at least in the photo it does have kind of a brownish tint to it, but I don't think it is rust, as stainless steel ...


8

As per @Joe's comment you don't season enameled cookware. I did a Google search on this cookware. Per the specs, the inside is enameled. And nowhere in the description or specs could I find any reference to the pan being pre-seasoned. (Which makes sense for an enameled pan.) Additionally, I found nothing claiming that the pan is non-stick. Here's a link to ...


7

As far as I can tell, no one weighing in with an opinion here has ever used a Fissler Pan. That makes perfect sense because anyone that has would has could have answered the question quite easily. Is it worth the money? Yes. Let me tell you my story. Like most reasonable people, I would not have considered paying $250 for a frying pan. I was given the pan ...


7

Not sure if Teflon looks any different when its worn out, but if it does its not much different. Exempting, of course, things like scratched & peeling Teflon. If your pan is no longer giving you the nonstick performance you want, and you've tried basic stuff like giving it a good scrub (using a non-scratching sponge, of course), then it seems like you'...


7

First, you don't crowd the pan when sauteing. If you do it, you are no longer sauteing, because your food doesn't come in contact with the surface frequently enough. You also can't really keep the separate pieces hopping, the best you could do would be to throw it around as a mass (like a pancake turning), which means they'll touch the pan with one side only,...


7

The problem is that you're using a lid. Spatter screens keep the oil mostly contained, while still allowing any moisture to escape. A lid, on the other hand, collects the moisture on the underside of the lid. When you go to lift it, the water drops back into the oil, and causes increased spattering. You're actually better off without a lid, if you don't ...


7

I think thermal shock is unlikely to be a problem at the temperatures you're likely to use. I had heard that it is mainly a problem if the pan is very hot (500 degrees or more, although some materials like cast iron are more susceptible to thermal shock than others) and if the shock is very great, like plunging the whole thing into cold water. I wouldn't ...


7

Then you aren't using "low to medium heat". The heat is defined by how quickly your food cooks, not by the setting on the stove. Lower your heat until the food fries at a reasonable rate. As for the oil, if in doubt, err on the side of adding a bit more than you think you'll need.


6

You shouldn't need any oil when frying a hamburger, but you definitely need to lower the heat. I fry my hamburgers on Medium-Heat in a stainless skillet. Depending on the size of the patty*, I put the patty into a heated up pan and flip after about 6 minutes, then flip again after another 6 minutes, then again after 2 and then it should be done 2 minutes ...


6

Health Risks Associated with Asbestos The reputation of asbestos is indeed well-deserved. Inhalation of asbestos fibers can cause a wide range of potentially fatal conditions. It is unlikely that normal home use of a product that contains asbestos will expose one to asbestos fibers. However, people who work with asbestos, whether mining the raw materials ...


6

A George Foreman -type grill does a good job keeping bacon flat, and also lets the fat drain away as it cooks:


6

This is the way I cook bacon and it almost always gives me flat bacon: Put the bacon in a cold pan. Put the pan on the stove and turn it to medium heat. Let the fat slowly render out and fry the bacon on its own. Cook to your desired crispness The gradual heating helps the bacon maintain its shape and is the best way to cook bacon, IMO.


6

Matching the size of pan to size of burner is the most important consideration for creating a cooking surface with even temperature. Parts of the pan bottom that reach beyond an electric element will not heat well at all and could remain a hundred degrees or more lower in temperature than the center of the pan, depending on the pan size and design. (Yes, I'...


6

The theories that have come out in comments are most likely right on. Cast iron is special in how well it retains heat. Give cast iron ample preheating time, and you can drop in cold food without a significant drop in the temperature of the pan. That equals crispy. Even a pretty good and heavy non-stick pan is not going to give sweet potatoes the kind of ...


5

I have had the same issue when cooking lots of quesadillas, and have found the following combination of techniques to work quite well. The obvious answer has been hit upon already, lower the heat. But I think that's missing an important aspect of the issue. What's happening is most likely that you are turning on the heat and then cooking your first omelet ...


5

Rolling when the consistency is correct is important. Looking at your example I would say that attempt needed more heat. The egg should be cooked on the bottom, while being 'jelly-like' on the top. This makes the roll stick to itself without sticking to the pan. You also need to just wipe down the pan with more oil after each roll. When in doubt turn up the ...


5

The problem you will have is cooking the meat without burning the breadcrumbs and/or the breadcrumbs absorbing lots of oil. You could get around this by baking the schnitzel rather than frying them. However, you don't necessarily need a hammer to thin the meat - a heavy saucepan or rolling pin will do just as good a job.


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