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35

After I found the pack of microwave popcorn again I decided to do a quick search on the English web. I found that the corn in the bag is just normal popcorn mixed with some fake butter and that there'd be no issues popping it on the stove. Then I looked for good ways of popping corn on a stove and found an excellent video with step-by-step instructions. ...


34

You need to realize that oil doesn't splatter, water does. In fact, you could heat oil until it catches fire without any mayor movement. But the moment water reaches the oil, which in a hot pan is way beyond the boiling point for water, it will instantly turn into steam, expand and pull oil drops with it. So apart from lowering the heat - which is not what ...


31

Advantages: You can make pasta in your water boiler. Disadvantages: Hard to clean. Waste of energy, a water boiler is on or off, it will expend full energy keeping the water boiling. Incredibly dangerous, a big fire hazard. Because it's modified to ignore the internal temperature sensor it will keep heating and heating even if all the water is vaporized. ...


21

No, you can't. You should always assume glass is not safe to use on the stovetop. Essentially none of it is, and while there are a very few exceptions, they'll say so explicitly. (For example this set says stovetop-safe in the description.) That bowl is nothing special, definitely not stovetop-safe - it'd shatter under the thermal stress. If you look ...


16

Just tried it - answer is no. Wish i'd read this before it cracked because of the heat.


16

It is not a property of the stove (or the markings on it). Words like "medium heat" actually refer to the speed at which your food is cooking, and there are a lot of factors which contribute to that. Beyond the energy output of your burners, there is the type of stove (electric, gas, induction), the thermodynamic properties of your pan, the relation of pan ...


14

I would absolutely not recommend heating Pyrex with any type of direct heat, ever. That stuff goes off like a hand-grenade, highly dangerous - not to mention messy. I've seen it happen too many times for it to be even vaguely worth the risk; even when accidentally placed on recently switched-off hobs. Pyrex is a low-expansion glass. However, low-...


13

In Scandinavia we have this thing: The "lid" is a thin wire mesh that allows steam to escape and keeps most of the oil in. I have no idea what it is called in english :-)


13

Commercial burners generally have a high power output. A commercial kitchen doesn't have to be large to have 12 burners, all capable of 3kW, in a small space, plus ovens, and running near constantly. By this point the cost saving of gas over electricity becomes significant (in the UK, electricity is about 3x more per kWh). In addition many premises wouldn't ...


11

Advantages: you free up one burner in your stovetop, and one pot Disadvantages: you might damage your equipment in the long term (starch might get in places where it shouldn't, and metallic parts will get damaged by the salt) you can't boil clean water in that boiler anymore (I doubt it will be easy to clean) if it doesn't have a temperature control, it ...


11

For a domestic kitchen a few thousand BTU is plenty as you will rarely need to heat more than a few liters of liquid. In a professional kitchen you might be asked to prepare a 30-litre portion of soup or broth or make 5 kilos of dry pasta at once. Doing that on a domestic range would take ages and that is not something you want in a kitchen. And with the ...


11

Warping doesn't matter with induction, since you don't need the pan to touch the surface, unlike resistive electric technology. I suspect that your unit is working as intended. I have personally never seen home units with a large coil, they typically have a 12 cm coil or less, and since most pans are larger, they only create direct heat in the middle of ...


9

In the oven, that heat is coming from all directions more or less equally. On the stovetop, the heat is coming only from the bottom. This can potentially cause convection, and almost certainly requires occasional stirring (especially for larger batches), meaning that the ingredients are being moved around. The combination of the ingredients being heated more ...


8

No. Tried it today melting some butter on a low heat and it exploded violently sending glass shards in a 1 metre radius. Suprised me as I remembered using Pyrex test tubes over a Bunsen burner in science class. Won't be trying that again. Epic fail!


8

I strongly advise against doing it. I tried stovetop seasoning at home and got terrible results. A stove gives you hot spots - on gas, this will be the ring where the flame touches the metal. The temperature of the metal in this hot spot is way too high, and the oil burns instead of polymerizing. You get some oil-charcoal in this place, which doesn't have ...


8

You can lower the temperature to simmer and reduce your sauce, it will take a longer time, but will do the job. or Have a look at splatter screens at your local stores (or online) or Or just put the pot lid on with a wooden spoon to keep it slightly ajar.


7

Here is what cook surface temperatures correspond to these labels: High: 450° to 650°+ Medium-High: 375° to 449° Medium: 325° to 374° Medium-Low: 250° to 324° Low: < 225° to 249° On my electric stove, I've so far roughly figured out this system, using an IF thermometer, measuring a matte cooking surface: High: 5 to 10 = 465° to 700° Medium-High: 4.0 = ...


7

It sounds like you had a lucky escape. It's not temperature itself that would damage stoneware as it's fired at over 1000C in manufacture (Wikipedia). Differential thermal expansion is what breaks things, e.g. heating the base much faster than the sides, or heating a thin layer quickly before the rest has time to warm through. By preheating it slowly you ...


7

Fortunately, temperatures don't usually need to be as precise in stovetop cooking as in baking. When you do need precise temperatures, you can stick a thermometer in the pan. This can be useful for tempering chocolate, scalding milk, deep frying, candy making, etc. The real problem with stovetop heat settings is that the knob on your stove only controls ...


6

Matching the size of pan to size of burner is the most important consideration for creating a cooking surface with even temperature. Parts of the pan bottom that reach beyond an electric element will not heat well at all and could remain a hundred degrees or more lower in temperature than the center of the pan, depending on the pan size and design. (Yes, I'...


6

When using a hood you need to think about where the fresh air comes in to replace the extracted air. It has to come from somewhere. If the rest of the house is completely sealed the fan will be useless. Opening ventilation close to the source of the smell can mean that air is drawn from the inlet to the hood bypassing the cooking. So what I find most ...


6

No, your stove is fine to look at. If it is actually an induction stove, then the red would just be a light to let you know it's on. The actual induction heating won't make the cooktop glow red. You might just have an electric glass/ceramic cooktop, though, in which case the heating will make it glow red, but it's still safe. Things glowing from heat are ...


6

A simple Google search yielded the following https://www.shopyourway.com/m/questions/1019973 All ovens are vented one way or another. You would not want to heat up the air in a sealed chamber because of thermal expansion. It would explode due to the heat expanding because it has no way to vent. A vent is also needed to vent fumes and by products that burn ...


6

Given that PTFE (Teflon) tape is meant for use on drinking water pipes, and PTFE is used for non-stick cookware (which gets much hotter than a kettle spout), I'd happily use it (the type for potable water). Making a habit of consuming it probably isn't a good idea but flecks of non stick coating do sometimes get into food, without poisoning anyone. I've ...


6

You are asking two questions here: Do commercial kitchens prefer gas stoves, and why? Is there another type of cooker that performs similarly to a gas range? Commercial kitchens I will first attempt to answer your first question. I will consider the three main types of cooker: gas, electric (including variants like ceramic or halogen hobs) and induction. ...


6

The jets can be unscrewed, using a properly sized wrench, and cleaned with an appropriately sized cleaner. Once clean they can screwed back in. They are typically made from brass and are soft. Using the wrong wrench can round off the hex head. More importantly the orifice in the jet can be unintentionally enlarged or damaged easily. Inserting anything from ...


5

The rice, as you know, is the cornerstone to quality sushi – no matter how superior seafood you obtain (which is also very important), if the rice isn't done properly your sushi fails. Always use a glutinous, short-grained, japonica rice, or else your rolls and other sushi construction will likely fall apart as soon as your guests pick it up. A good ...


5

Rather than empty pan temperature, I suggest adding a quantity (like 2 cups) of water and measuring the time from off to boil. As other posters have indicated, stoves vary in power (heat input over time) without respect to temperature. By the way, electric ovens usually come in constant power (except those with "preheat" and "clean" settings -- which use ...


5

No no no. I cooked a whole meal and had to throw it away because my casserole dish exploded! I was heating hot pan drippings to make a gravy on my stove top and after 5 minutes on low-med flame it exploded and glass (chunks and very fine pieces) flew 2 rooms away! Thank god no no one was hurt.


5

It is the rice that is important, regardless of the cooker you use. If you think you are unable to find Sushi rice on your own in local market, why not check with a Sushi stall chef/owner near by? Some people get mistaken with sticky rice, because really Sushi and sticky are on the same category. You could even say that Italian risotto is as well. However ...


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