Hot answers tagged

27

It's a double boiler. You use it when you need to use 'soft' heat. If you need to melt chocolate, or if you are making a hollandaise, or something that can easily scorch using direct heat, you use this pot. It has a much more forgiving heat, the heat is generated from steam from the water that boils in the bottom pot.


19

If you're doing it as a pot roast, the vegetables are mainly there to deliver flavour (unlike in a stew, where they're a major part of the dish). Sometimes they're eaten, sometimes discarded (which seems like a waste to me, so I would choose vegetables I'd want to eat). They take on a role similar to stock or a flavoured rub or oil when roasting in an oven. ...


15

"Double boiler" or "bain Marie". Put simmering water (and keep it at a simmer) in the lower pot (not touching the bottom of the top pot) and then put the top pot it. The idea that the constant temperature of the simmering steam is provide an even, predictable, well manageable temperature - 100 C. Its great for tempering chocolate (although be careful of ...


14

By quick-prepare ravioli, you mean without sauce, right? It's fine to (and you should) cover the pot to bring the water to a boil. Incidentally, it's best to start with cold water from the tap, hot tap water will likely be more contaminated, possibly with lead. Once the water is boiling, add the salt, then the pasta. Adding the pasta will bring down the ...


14

To directly answer the question as it was originally posted before edit: why does everyone add vegetables to slow cooker pot roast To save time Longer answer: It is not necessary to cook vegetables with meat. The vegetables do add flavor (a flavor that many appreciate) but I don't feel that is the main reason. Many people add potatoes to the pot ...


10

Stainless steel pots are pretty much indestructable and it should be safe to cook with. Just give it a good cleaning. Some hardwarevstores (lowes) have a ss cleaner that might get rid of the yellow tinge. Otherwise, it'll look like every other well used ss pot. 18/10 ss is 18% chromium, 10% nickel, and balance in iron and stable to higher temperatures. If ...


10

When you can foods, even in a mass production setting, you're pouring near boiling contents into the cans. So heating it in your soup is no different than having used those tomatoes in the soup. If it wasn't food safe it wouldn't be used for canning. It would do no more harm to eat the soup than it would be to eat the tomatoes out of that can. Addition: ...


8

There are two possibilities I can see: The steam can wet the pepper in the mill and cause it to cake in the grinding mechanism There's an over-protective lawyer worried someone will scald themselves and blame the grinder company. Which of the two is your guess. Personally I use my grinder over steaming pots all the time and I've never had any problems, ...


8

Some dutch ovens are easier to pour from than others; it depends on the how the edge or lip of the pot is curved. If you have one that is not easy to pour from, minimize the amount of pouring that you do by transferring the content out with a ladle... or since ladling can be slow.... I use a glass measuring cup as a scoop. These tend to pour quite well, ...


7

This is what I do for cooking ONE cup rice: Soak one cup rice in one and a half cup water for 20 minutes. This should be done after rinsing the rice properly since, the water used for soaking is NOT to be thrown away. After 20 minutes put the vessel with the existing water on the gas stove (with a loose lid on) on a high heat. When the water reaches the ...


7

You might have given the answer in your question. If the device is to be used as a steamer as well, then there has to be enough room at the bottom of the pot for steaming. How much is enough? There are two things to consider: The bottom section should hold enough liquid that there won't be concerns about boiling the pot dry for anything you might want to ...


6

There are no health safety risks with storing food in a stainless steel, or most other cooking pot metals for that mater The pot should be fine, but there is always a risk with metal in a freezer in that bare skin contact may freeze to it. Also other products in freezer bags may even freeze to it In general it's easier not to use metal containers in the ...


6

While all of these are large pots (or may at least come in large sizes) they have different purposes, which lead to differences in typical construction. Saucepans are intended for general purpose cookery, and usually have solid construction, and permit searing in the pot, reducing, and a variety of other tasks. They are the most difficult to characterize ...


6

You are going to have trouble scaling that recipe up to that size, due to the limited heat output of a home type burner element or electrical element. They can only have sufficient power to brown so many hash browns, or cook so many eggs at once. Furthermore, most home cooks don't have a pan with sufficient surface area to manage that quantity of ...


6

I could not find (quick search) a reference to the fact that using a metal bowl "destroys" vitamins. Aluminum bowls will react to some ingredients, mostly acidic ones (tomatoes, citrus..), but in a normal usage (blending fruits) , it should not be a problem. Stainless steel bowls are NON reactive, and can be used with all ingredients, and usually sturdy ...


6

I think the answer to your question lies in the etymology of the words. Pan is actually coming from Germaic pfanne (in Dutch panne). Which is from Latin patina (shallow pan, dish) and Greek patane (dish, plate). On the other hand, pot also has Germanic roots it means vessel (also in Dutch) coming from pottus (drinking cup) for Latin. So the difference as ...


5

If the grinder has a steel mechanism, rust could be the concern.


5

Stainless steel is not coated, and will not be permanently harmed by any temperatures achievable in the home. It melts at about 1500 C (2750 F). It might be warped or discolored, but it is fine to use.


5

You might want to try to use Barkeepers Friend or Bon Ami. This is what allclad recommends for a task like this. I have removed many stains from my allclad with these products even on the polished side of the pans. It works great. Super cheap product as well.


5

Ladling can be slow, but I recommend it as well. Part of the reason why its difficult to pour is because the Dutch oven has no corner from which you could make a spout. If you had a big square container, one with enough open surface area that you don't have to be precise, pour it there first, then pour from there. Also, rather than slowly angling the pan, ...


5

In my mind, bread baking containers are divided into two categories: 1- Pans for shape Many bread pans are used only to give bread shape. These can very from "normal" loaf pans for sandwich bread to baguette pans. These pans need to just stay out of the way of the heat as much as possible. Baguette pans are even perforated for this reason. They are ...


5

While not relevant to ravioli, many other foods will have a different outcome simply because of the amount of water remaining in the food - removing the lid will result in higher evaporation but keeping the lid will keep the moisture inside, "steaming" the food from above. Depending on the recipe it may easily be that one or the other is the desired ...


5

In my experience, rice can be cooked in any pot. I cook quite a lot of Japanese style dishes, and as far as I can tell the rice is cooked in the same way as any other. For myself, I've done it in good "induction-able" steel pots, as well as huge (navy galley) aluminium pots, and a couple of low-quality stainless steel things too. They're all fine. Normally,...


5

I've done a lot a single ring camping cooking. My camper van has a bit more kitchen than yours but I still take a similar approach when staying in it and going to work. Here's a typical example that worked for me. I cooked a curry at home and put a portion in the fridge (freezing is also an option). When camping I boiled water and put it in a vacuum flask. ...


5

I would place cooked beans and rice in a warmed pot (cast iron is good) and then place it in your oven set at its lowest temperature...Maybe 175F, and certainly below 200F. At 375F your rice and beans will continue to cook.


5

As a native English speaker, certainly where I come from, saucepan and cooking pot are mostly interchangeable. However, I understand the differentiation to be that "pans" have long, extended handles and "pots" do not. So a pan: And a pot: Edit to include dictionary definitions kindly provided in a comment by user3169 Pan: "A pan is a round metal container ...


4

Syrion has already provided some good advice, but I think I can expand it. Note: I live alone and cook for one. And there are a few pieces I use every time. I have more, but I only use them when the primary tool for a task is busy because I am making an involved recipe consisting of multiple components. Beginning cooks seldom make such recipes. So here the ...


4

This recipe should definitely work if you follow it correctly. Comparing your recipe to it might tell you what you did wrong. From the information you already gave, it seems certain that you didn't cook it long enough (as rumtscho said in the comments). Other things that could have been wrong: oven not hot enough (your oven might not be as hot as you think) ...


4

The possible risks I can think of are (1) the large thermal mass may mean that the soup cools off too slowly, leading to spoilage in the middle, and (2) freezer burn on the top of the soup, because there's no truly effective way to seal out air from a pot. In practice, (1) is unlikely unless you're talking about a 25-gallon pot or something, in which case it ...


4

Use of a double boiler limits the maximum temperature the food being cooked can reach. The water in the lower part of the double boiler can only reach 100*C (212*F) before it boils. The food being cooked, therefore, can only reach a maximum temperature of 100*C (212*F). It can't go over that until all the water in the lower pot has boiled off.


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