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It depends. As @RadioRaheem has said, any pan that would be damaged by this is probably not fit for purpose. However, many non-stick pans should not be placed on direct heat without any oil or liquid in them, as this can cause the coating to detach or deteriorate. So while I doubt frozen food would actually cause your pan to fail, preheating it is probably ...


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I'm gonna risk getting chastised and answer from first principles, rather than any referenced sources! The pan will not be affected at all from this. A home freezer will chill foods down to around -20C, a refrigerator to around 5C and the stovetop can heat your pan up to around 350C. Putting food from the fridge into your preheated pan (its most common use-...


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Outside of premade freezer dishes (as Johanna notes, those are basically never defrosted), the "do I need to defrost it" question is really quite interesting. For the most part, if the food is already in its "to be prepared" state, defrosting isn't very important. It's when you're going to further work with it that you need to defrost ...


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Frozen foods are made for convenience. For most people, convenience does not include remembering to defrost the food several hours before cooking. So the recipe and cooking method are indeed for cooking straight from frozen, unless they clearly state otherwise. You will get the best result if you take it directly from the freezer to the oven. For most frozen ...


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You should include the liquid and account for it in measuring your thickener. Remember: fruit is mostly water. Take a look at a chart listing fruits by water content. Berries, stone fruit, and your other likely pie candidates all hover around 85% water; most of it escapes while the pie cooks. So to get a thick pie filling, you need quite a bit of sugar and ...


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