32

Instant coffee is "soluble solids of ground coffee" - ie, they made coffee, then they dried the result. Actual ground coffee will never dissolve. When you make 'real' coffee you run/pour/pass water through the ground coffee, then throw away the solids. There's no getting around the 'throwing away' part.


19

There are a few different methods to achieve this. The end goal is to get layers of different colored frosting in rings in your piping bag. The method I ended up preferring uses a piece of cling film/plastic wrap along with your piping bag and tip. This method also makes it easy to have colors change as you progress. Start by cutting off a square piece of ...


11

If you look at how boxed cake mixes do it, you'll get the right idea. They combine the dry ingredients and you have to add the wet ingredients. There are a couple of good reasons for this: spoilage (not too much of a problem if you're taking about a couple of days in the fridge); and gluten formation, which requires water and will give a tough, bready ...


10

It's a bit late now, but if you've only got real coffee and want to make buttercream you can still do it. I made a latte buttercream by brewing very strong coffee in hot milk, then straining it and adding the liquid to the plain buttercream ingredients, tasting and adjusting the proportions for texture. It worked well. I did this by: Brewing 1 Tbsp of ...


9

Microbes need available water to grow, and sugar reduces the availability of water to them. In addition, spread as a thin layer on cake, water evaporates (further reducing water availability). You can find out more about factors influencing microbial growth in the FDA's Bad Bug Book. As the book notes, generally, you can only know from experiment if a ...


8

YES YOU CAN!! As I said in the question, I used this recipe: Joe Pastry - Julia Child . Before I embarked on the experiment, I whipped egg yolks with my hand mixer and in my food processor. Since there seemed to be no difference, I proceeded. The first picture was before whipping, the second was whipped for 5 minutes with the food processor, the third ...


8

Based on your description, I am 99.999...% certain that your wife likes the good ol' American-style Wilton buttercream. It's literally butter and powdered sugar whipped together, with a little milk, salt, and flavoring to taste. Thick, heavy, sticky, grainy and pasty are all good descriptors. For what you like-- the most likely possibility, since this ...


7

Pretty much. A "filling" is any substance inside of a pastry or pastry-like food item (a filling inside a sandwich, a filling inside a cinnamon roll, a filling inside a pie, a filling inside a calzone). So when you're talking about cake, anything between layers is a filling: more frosting, a layer of jam, maybe some ganache. Frosting is a specific type of ...


6

When I've seen them used, they first frosted the cake, smoothed it out, then placeed the rice paper on top. My understanding is that the moisture in the frosting can end up melting the rice paper, so that it basically disappears into the frosting, with the ink effectively transfering into the frosting. As I've never done it myself, I have no idea if there ...


6

The particle size of regular ground coffee is too large to use in icing, as you’ve found; you’ll be able to see and feel the individual particles. But coffee specifically ground for making espresso is much finer — it’s much closer to a fine powder than “grounds” — works nicely. It still won’t actually dissolve, per se, but the individual bits are ...


5

Here are some suggestions: To make the frosting whiter: If you use butter, eliminate it. Use all of the other standard ingredients but substitute heavy whipping cream for the butter. Add until you have the consistency you want. While I can't say I would do this, a viable option would be to substitute a good brand of vegetable shortening for the butter. ...


5

Your best bet is probably gelatin stabilized whipped cream. This recipe from Wilton gives you an example of how to proceed. You can google many other results. Depending on your tastes, to compliment gingerbread, you may also consider some alternate frostings which will hold up better at room temperature and taste great: White chocolate ganache (sample ...


5

There are two things I would consider with the frosting. The first is that either the cake or the kitchen was too warm when you tried to frost the cake. It's happened to me a few times that I set the indoors temperature too warm in the winter and frosting keeps melting for me. Freezing the cake for about 20 minutes before attempting to frost it will usually ...


5

Yes, you can certainly mix in something to change the flavor, and cream cheese sounds like a good option. You will probably need to soften the cream cheese (microwave for a bit, but don't melt it), whip it, and then add in the store-bought frosting and whip until fully incorporated. Depending on how much cream cheese flavor you like, I'd recommend ...


5

As discussed here, the human palate is remarkably sensitive to granularity. Even particles as fine as 2 microns have an effect on the subjective perception of food. This means it's going to be very hard to grind something fine enough by hand that it doesn't significantly affect the finished product. You can get away with adding cocoa powder to frosting ...


4

Plain whipped cream is somewhat problematic as an icing. It doesn't hold shapes well, and it begins to deflate and weep after just a few hours, even in the refrigerator. There are a number of ways to make stabilized whipped cream, which is more durable and pipes better. Here is a recipe from Wilton. It uses gelatin to stabilize the whipped cream. The recipe ...


4

There are several options for frostings that are light and fluffy, and not based on just powdered (confectioner's) sugar and shortening, that aren't just whipped cream. Other answers have already mentioned the last two, but I wanted to add whipped ganache. whipped ganache--my personal favorite. Of course, this is always and only chocolate (I don't call ...


4

It is called crenation. Basically, the sugar acts as a super concentrated solution and pulls the fluid from the milk. When it does this, it also pulls fluid from any bacteria which may cause spoilage. Essentially, killing the bacteria through osmosis.


4

If you use the buttercream option, let the icing dry a bit before putting the rice paper on, as too much moisture will cause it to collapse and the ink to run. Also, I wouldn't recommend pressing the rice paper down, but just patting it onto slightly tacky buttercream. White icing is best as the rice paper is quite translucent. The other alternative you ...


4

Coating your cake balls is a good idea, it will help them retain their moisture and shape. There are plenty of not especially sweet options, I would try a cream cheese based frosting with less sugar or a medium-sweet chocolate ganache.


4

As another option, you can keep the sweetness down by using something that will give a very thin glaze, such as a thin royal icing. You can make it with just confectioner's sugar and water, but if you have meringue powder, it'll set up a bit firmer. Pour it into a cup, dip the cake pops, then shake or twirl to remove most of it, then let dry. (a block of ...


4

Put them in the freezer on your parchment covered baking sheet for an hour. Get your Tupperware and cover the bottom with a folded paper towel. Then remove the flowers and put them in the Tupperware. Cover the flowers with another paper towel and seal the Tupperware tight. The paper towels will help keep them container somewhat desiccated so the flowers don'...


4

You could try adding a piping gel, such as the one found here, which contains no eggs or dairy. Alternatively, the colder you keep the whipped cream icing, the better it will hold its shape. You could refrigerate the icing until immediately prior to serving which would help.


4

Here is an interesting entry from King Arthur Flour, who should not have a major stake in the game. They hit a bunch of varieties with a hair drier to see how they held up. Their test though was only on holding up to the heat, not safety though. One could suggest using pasteurized eggs as an option though to get around safety concerns. Quick summary, ...


3

The purpose of the beating (and thus using a stand mixer) is two fold: To get sufficient agitation to form an emulsion from the yolks, the butter, and the liquid ingredients; To incorporate air creating a foam, for the light texture that is expected While the food processor is almost certain to form and maintain the emulsion, they are not normally designed ...


3

I've made many a cream cheese quick frosting and have never needed to refrigerate one. The Joy of Cooking says a quick icing made with powdered sugar, butter and a bit of dairy will keep at room temperature for up to 3 days.


3

Because of the dairy in your frosting, it really ought to be chilled overnight. It could warm up on to room temperature for a few hours. Also, do cover the cake, so dust and stuff doesn't get on it.


3

Have you ever tried Italian Buttercream? I learned about it in culinary school and it is now my favorite! LIght, airy, not too sweet. It has a wonderful texture! Here is the recipe we used - It's a keeper! http://www.grouprecipes.com/92114/italian-buttercream-from-the-culinary-institute-of-america.html Italian buttercream is made by blending butter into ...


3

I agree with you on the whipping cream as it's too light. When I went to the US and had to live there for over a year I thought the traditional american frosting was too buttery for my taste, but later found the amazing cream cheese frosting! When I bake a vanilla butter cake I whip up a batch of regular vanilla buttercream with the addition of cream cheese. ...


3

If you want to go completely fat-free, check your favorite search engine for 'merengue frosting'. Most tend to be a bit sweet though ... almost marshmallow-like. There are also some recipes out there that use sour cream ... they don't work with all cakes, but the tang can help to offset the overly sweet qualities of many frostings, without getting to far ...


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