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59

The difference between whole milk (or any milk, really) and half-and-half is one of fat content, not overall concentration. Half-and-half gets its name from being a 50/50 blend of milk and cream, which normally separate because the less dense fats concentrated in cream float naturally to the top of the mostly-water milk. However, milk also contains a number ...


30

Yes, your butter contains water - which is perfectly normal. While oil is 100% fat, butter is only around 80%1 fat plus some protein and ca. 15% water. Regarding your question where the water comes from - If you look at how butter is made, it becomes obvious that the water was there from the beginning: You start with cow's milk, which has a natural fat ...


22

First, the alcohol doesn't burn off. We had a table about the percentage of alcohol left after a period of cooking, and especially in something cooked as short as a pasta sauce, there is a substantial amount left. For the longer discussion, see Cooking away alcohol. Second, alcohol is a great solvent. It can leach aromatics from spices and herbs which ...


14

Rule of thumb, dairy in the north and coconut in southern recipes. ie korma wouldn't have coconut Indian yogurt is made with whole milk. As with western recipes, balancing the fat for good mouth-feel is important: yogurt can be a good choice when a larger quantity of liquid is called for. Cream works great when a finishing splash smooths out flavors without ...


13

Short answer: cream is far from ideal as a frying medium. In the US at least, heavy cream is about 35% milkfat. Recently, I have learned the UK has a product called double cream which is closer to 50% milkfat. So what is the rest of the cream, if it is only 50% milkfat at the high end? It is water, with dissolved milk solids and minerals. Even butter ...


13

You can't really substitute double cream for butter as the fat/water ratio is different - it's basically just too wet. However, guess what they make butter out of - cream! If you 'over whip' cream, the fat separates from the liquid leaving you with fresh butter. Naturally this is easy if you have an electric mixer. If you're doing it by hand, prepare to be ...


12

Whipped cream is whipping cream after it has been whipped. Whipping cream is just cream with at least 30% fat content (that would be called Light Whipping Cream in the US). Heavy Whipping Cream contains at least 36% fat and up to 40% and rarely (in the US) even higher. Until these creams are whipped, they are just liquid. After they are whipped, they're ...


12

I've done some experimentation on this topic and I've come to the conclusion that one of the main flavors missing is sweetness. If you look at the sugars in half & half they are usually lower to start with than whole milk. When you dilute it to try to match whole milk you end up with quite a bit less sugars in the final product, even if concentration of ...


11

You're comparing different quantities. A serving of cream (per your label) is a tablespoon. You're comparing that to 1 cup (or 16 tablespoons) of milk. The percentage that you're seeing is not what percentage of your dairy product is fat, but the percentage of the recommended daily amount of that nutrient found in a single serving. % Daily Value is figured ...


11

Pretend milk is Kool-Aid The cream is sugar and the Mr Strawberry is a powder with strawberry taste but no sweet. I am supposed to mix 1 pack Kool-Aid, 1 cup sugar, and 1 gallon water. I mess up and put in 2 cups of sugar. If I dilute down the sugar with a gallon of water I get the sugar ratio correct but now the Kool-Aid ratio is 1/2 what it is ...


11

If you are trying to make chocolate frosting using whipped cream, you need to: Whip the cream first. Melt the chocolate and add some amount of whipped cream to the melted chocolate (mix it by cut and fold method) Add this mixture to the remaining whipped cream and fold it. Don't over-mix it, it would knock out the air from the whipped cream. To make ...


10

A general rule-of-thumb is that a butterfat content of 30% or more is required to produce whipped cream. Half and half (called half cream in the UK), which is comprised of half milk and half cream has a butterfat content between 10 - and 12.5% butterfat, based on various sources discovered in my research. That being said, I've read that half and half can ...


10

I would suggest making a Mornay sauce (Béchamel sauce with cheese) which you should find will hold together well and provide an unctuous, rich, spreadable texture. Simply melt butter in a saucepan over a medium-low heat, whisk in an equal quantity of flour, cook it out a little, then add cold milk, whisking all the while, until you get a smooth sauce like ...


9

Quite simply, it's the fat content. Whole milk or "full-fat" milk is 3.25% fat by weight. Heavy cream is 36-40% fat by weight. These two products are at opposite ends of the fat spectrum, and there's very little difference between 1% and 3% when it comes to an item such as caramel sauce, for which the optimal ratio is about 50% fat. (A little butter can ...


9

They are completely different. Clotted cream, also called Devonshire cream, is made by heating unpasteurized milk until a layer of cream forms on the surface. The mixture is then cooled, and the cream skimmed off. It has a butterfat content between 55 percent and 63 percent. Unlike creme fraiche it is not a cultured milk product, and is typically eaten as a ...


9

According to Wikipedia, buffalo milk has 8% milkfat by weight. Cow's milk is listed on that same table as 3.9%, so I'll use that figure for consistency, though the number does vary both from cow to cow and by breed. So, you need to figure out the portions in which you'd mix together whole milk and heavy cream to reach the same fat content as your buffalo ...


9

Ice cream depends critically on the fat in the dairy to form the structure and mouth feel. Ice cream mixes there fore are typically fairly high in dairy fat. You have substituted a comparatively low fat mock cream. which simply does not have the fat necessary to create the body of the ice cream. In fact, the so-called homemade cream recipe is just ...


9

You need to make processed cheese, aka American cheese, out of it. Parmesan is harder to use in such an application than other cheeses, because it is drier. I would suggest starting with other cheeses until you have mastered the process. The basic process is to make a paste-like substance out of your cheese and some condensed milk in the food processor. ...


9

Commercial butter has about 80% fat, 15% water and 5% solids. Depending on where you are located double cream has 48% fat (UK), 40% (Canada) and the remaining fraction is obviously water and little solids. Supposed, you need 100g butter in your receipe. This means that the dough will have 80g fat and 15g water (for a simple calculation I omit the content ...


9

It's difficult to say what exactly happened to your cream so it got lumpy, but it's quite possible that it's overbeaten. When making chocolate whipped cream you should make sure to chill the mixture thoroughly. I always let mine stay in the fridge over night. This of course only works if you mix enough cream with the chocolate, otherwise it gets too hard ...


8

Corn starch only thickens when heated to 180 F, so it probably is not helping at all with your whipped cream. I live in the US, so I cannot compare to whipped cream in the UK. Whipped cream for cake fillings is often beaten almost to the breaking point to make the foam as thick as possible. I assume you are whipping the cream sufficiently, and it still ...


8

Cream does last quite a while in the fridge, especially before it's opened - it has a pretty high fat content. So you may be able to buy it when you can, and still have it around when you want it. Failing that, honestly, I think that anything you can do with milk and additives is probably not going to be nearly as good as actual whipped cream, so you might ...


8

This site explains two methods of making whipping cream from milk. The first is by manipulating store-bought milk, by adding gelatin, temperature and a lot of stirring. The second is by separating the cream out of raw milk. The site claims that the result of both methods can be used for whipped cream. A third method I sometimes use when a recipe asks for a ...


8

There are several ways to thicken without turning it into whipped cream or imparting other flavors: Boil until reduced to desired thickness (whisk constantly, do not burn which will cause the flavor to change) Add and incorporate gelatin Add and incorporate corn starch or flour Your desired thickness will dictate how long you boil or how much you ...


8

"Authentic" carbonara does not have cream. It's made with just guanciale, egg (yolks and whites), pecorino romano, and black pepper. Thanks to @GiuppeP for the clarification. However, at least in the US (and, it appears, Canada) there is tremendous variation to what folks call "carbonara". What is more relevant to the question is technique. Whether you ...


7

I think you've proved already there's only one way to do this - buy the shells "unloaded" and fill them when you get there. Assuming the bakery people are nice, ask them to put the filling in an icing bag and refrigerate that until you arrive. Put the shells separately in a cake tin, load the shells when you get to your destination. I'm sure that everyone ...


7

No, you cannot fry in cream. But you can cook your vegetables in it. There are three types of "real" frying: deep frying (you submerge food in a very hot oil bath), shallow frying - you put a thin layer of fat on a very hot pan and sear a big piece of food on the pan, e.g. a steak, and stir-frying - you have an even hotter pan/wok and keep moving small ...


7

Yes, this is possible but you need a high-speed blender like a Thermomix or Vitamix to do so. There's actually a recipe on the Thermomix website: http://www.ukthermomix.com/recshow.php?rec_id=29 Ingredients 250 gm unsalted butter 250 gm milk (full cream or semi-skimmed) Method Weigh butter in pieces and milk into the Thermomix bowl. ...


6

Here's a link to the US specifications: 21 CFR PART 131—MILK AND CREAM From there: Light Cream (18% or more fat) Heavy Cream (36% or more) Dry Cream (I've never heard of it, 40% or more) From the percentages provided by Papin's answer, it looks like: U.S. Light Cream is likely Single Cream equivalent Some U.S. Heavy Creams may be close to Double Cream U....


6

It sounds to me like you didn't get the gelatin dispersed properly. Since the recipe you linked to doesn't explicitly mention it, and neither does your question, I'm going to assume that you didn't bloom the gelatin first. You must do this if you want proper dispersion of any gelatin product. To bloom powdered gelatin, just sprinkle it over cold liquid ...


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